Tag Archives: Northern & Northeastern CO

Girl Scout Gold Award project: Kayleigh Limbach, Niwot, ” International Baccalaureate guidebook”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My Gold Award project was creating a guidebook for incoming International Baccalaureate students to help them weigh their options for their academics at Niwot High School. The International Baccalaureate (IB) Program is a rigorous academic pathway that offers a lot of challenge to students, but sometimes the challenge is underestimated. I designed a questionnaire about the IB program for current students to complete, then used their responses to make a guidebook full of advice and reflections from these students. This information, I think, will be extremely helpful to incoming IB students. I know I would have liked to have it when I was an incoming student. My project can be viewed on my website here: https://sites.google.com/site/ibstudentguidebook

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Given that my target audience is incoming IB students, I unfortunately won’t be able to see a measurable impact for about two years when they finish their IB courses. However, I did send out my guidebook to incoming IB students this year unofficially, and some responded saying the information was helpful and helped their decision in doing International Baccalaureate or Advanced Placement programs.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable because it can be repeated by IB students in the future. Because the student input collected in the book is valuable to teachers, administrators, and especially incoming IB students, the repetition of the survey will help provide an accurate snapshot of the IB program at Niwot High School at the time. It can be repeated for as long as IB is offered at Niwot.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The information was used in the IB audit. Every five years, an auditor comes to Niwot High School to evaluate the IB program at the school. The information I collected was made available to this auditor, who may use the information at the summit for the IB program in Switzerland.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned I really am capable of more than I thought. In finishing this project, I proved to myself I can study for school, go to sports practice, have a job, and be able to complete valuable and fulfilling projects like this. It was not required that I get my Gold Award, and there was no consequence in not getting in other than letting myself down. I didn’t let myself down and I followed through.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I will remember the communication, organization, and patience skills I developed in my project for several years. In college and in my workplace in the future, I will be able to communicate my ideas clearly, work with others collaboratively, and be more patient with myself and others. Earning my Gold Award definitely helped me mature for the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

It was very important to me that I finish the final rank of Girl Scouts since I have devoted so much of my life to it. I began as a Daisy when I started first grade, and now I finished my Gold Award as I graduate high school. Girl Scouts has been a constant thing In my life, and I felt I would be doing myself a disservice if I didn’t take advantage of the opportunity to complete Girl Scouts to the highest level.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I definitely did a lot of go-getting for this project, which strengthened these skills a lot. I realized I am very capable of getting things done if I really want them to get done. Earning my Gold Award helped me become a confident young woman who can accomplish anything I want to accomplish.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Beth Bolon, Longmont, “Speak above the shoes (empowering through communication)”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My workshop “Speak above the shoes” took place June 30-July 2 from 10 – 11:30 a.m. Eight girls attended the course: six 9th graders, one 8th grader, and an enthusiastic 6th grader. Six of the girls were Girl Scouts, who heard about it through their troop leaders, and two of them heard about it from the advertising I did with Coffee & Connections, the local cafes, and my flyers. The curriculum of my project was centered around the concept that there are more ways to communicate than the traditional verbal word-of-mouth.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The workshop was successful, based on the survey results at the end of the three days, and the comfort and confidence levels of the girls in class while presenting. Each girl found a communication style that suited her; there were even two girls who used a style that was not in my curriculum (and did some modeling). The actual class was quite enjoyable, we all sat on the floor on big comfy pillows with paper, markers, pens, and other art supplies around us. The girls got to be in a close, intimate environment that was calm and let them talk to each other without the pressures of a regular classroom.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

“Speak above the shoes” will be sustained through the Front Range networking group, “Coffee & Connections,” as a two-year commitment to support and promote the website I have created for the project: https://speakabovetheshoes.wixsite.com/speakabovetheshoes. I will also be working with them during these years to continue the energy of my project since they are already working on encouraging woman in business. I am also in communication with the Longmont Public Library on how to best link my website with their programs all along the Front Range to help educate more young woman.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Much of the project was inspired from my own experiences moving from school-to-school and having to learn over and over the various forms of communication throughout the United States. During a Girl Scout service unit event, my troop was invited to an exclusive showing of the movie “Girl Rising,” which further solidified my desire to bring out women’s voices in whatever comfortable, non-threatening, inspiring ways that they can no matter their personal circumstances.

“Speak above the shoes” is already moving into the national and international arena through the generous support and marketing of Coffee & Connections since their membership is global.

My website will be available to many moms and their daughters as small business owners around the world participate in the online promotion of “Speak above the shoes” with Coffee & Connections partnering with me.

What did you learn about yourself?

I found I had a lot of anxiety as my workshop dates came closer and I found and implemented ways to calm myself down through breathing, which came in handy when one of the girls was nervous about sharing something she had made. So, we shared ways we had learned to deal with our own anxiety.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Knowing that I have created such a project and did it with a team makes me feel more confident in my own abilities for any future endeavor I take on. Teaching girls how to communicate and use their voices taught me more about myself and how far I’ve come, and that I can continue to improve. I am not a stationary person, I am always growing and will never cease to change.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I never liked group projects in school because I always ended up doing all the work, so having a team that was excited and ready to help was eye-opening for me. Girl Scouts is full of people who want you to learn, have fun, and realize you’re not alone. This has all helped me to get over some of my own issues from high school, and makes me feel ready for what lies ahead.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

The Gold Award is quite a task to accomplish, and I got approval the last semester of high school. I had to be a go-getter because I only had the summer to complete my project and make sure it would be sustained after I had gone on to college (I could not wait around and slowly put things together).

It made me an innovator because I had to rework the project I originally had in Ohio (I moved, so all my plans and connections were gone and had to be adapted to the people I had met in Colorado.)

It made me a risk-taker because I had to go, go, go so being nervous about contacting places to host my workshop, or asking a group to sustain my project after I was done was not something I could hesitate on. So, I jumped and found it all fell into place.

I had to be a leader because I had a team of advertisers, volunteers, and individuals ready to help make items for the workshop needing me to specify exactly what I wanted and when it had to be done.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Troop 70700 hosts “s’mores station” at National Night Out event

Submitted by Jen Rotar

Northern & Northeastern CO

Berthoud

On Tuesday, August 1, 2017, Troop 70700 from Berthoud joined the Larimer County Sheriff’s Office (LCSO) at Pioneer Park in Berthoud for an evening of community safety. The troop of 7th grade Cadettes hosted a s’mores station with a grill for toasting marshmallows, campfire safety bookmark craft, and make-your-own yummy edible campfires. In addition to supporting the LSCO’s community event, the girls also earned “Step 5” in their Night Owls badge, to host an “Extreme Nighttime Party.” The girls had fun helping neighborhood children of all ages assemble their edible campfires and decorate their bookmarks. The best part of the evening was making s’mores for all of the Larimer County officers and Berthoud firefighters, and delivering their treats around the park.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girls leading girls

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Despite overcast skies and a few rain drops, Troop 73392 enjoyed sharing their love of kayaking and paddleboarding with Cadette, Ambassador, and Senior Girl Scouts from Longmont, Brighton, and Thornton. Girls had the opportunity to try several different kayaks and paddleboards and then paddle across McIntosh Lake.

If you’re interested in joining the fun please contact Sharon Manning at sharon_colorado@msn.com. Currently, a few spaces are available for the August 12, 2017 workshop.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Leadership Summit in Northern & Northeastern CO moved

The Girl Scouts of Colorado Leadership Summit in our Northern & Northeastern CO region on September 23, 2017 in Fort Collins has been moved to Longmont. It is now at Front Range Community College – Boulder County Campus (2190 Miller Dr, Longmont, CO 80501). To learn more or register, use this link: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2017/northern_colorado_le.html

We appreciate your patience and understanding!

 

 

Boulder Girl Scout explores Greece

Submitted by Molly M., 2017 “Look Wider” International Travel Scholarship  winner

Northern & Northeastern CO

Boulder

Traveling around the world has always been a dream of mine since a very young age. When I came to a realization that I am growing up, and becoming more independent, traveling became a priority. For my parent’s honeymoon, they traveled all around the world for a whole year!  I just finished my senior year of high school, and I will be heading off to Fort Lewis College next year. It was decided that it was time for me to have my own experience unique to myself. I decided to join the “Greece Sea Kayaking” Girl Scouts Destination Trip.

Greece has been a place my parents have spoken highly of, and I thought the trip in itself looked incredible. I was able to use most of the money I have saved up in my Girl Scout account from selling more than 600 packages of Girl Scout Cookies for the past seven years, and I also worked on saving money from my job, working as a shift lead in a local ice cream store. The “Look Wider” International Travel Scholarship has helped so that I didn’t have to dig into my college savings that I also worked hard to earn.

We arrived in Kefalonia, Greece after a long day of traveling on June 22, 2017.  We started our kayaking adventure bright and early the next morning. We kayaked for six-days straight, covering about 100 km around the coast of Kefalonia and crossing over to Ithaca. We camped three of those nights, and stayed in nice hotels the other two nights. For me, this trip wasn’t far out of my comfort zone because I have gone on many multi-day rafting/camping trips in Colorado. However, for other girls it was different. Some girls on the trip had never camped before. This allowed a leadership position for me. I was there to help with efficiently packing camping gear for other girls, warding off bugs, and helping with cooking and cleaning more. Each girl had their own unique skills, and personality to add to the group, which made us work well as a team.

Between all the girls, we have all agreed to stay in touch after this trip.  Each girl had hugely different personalities, which came together perfectly. We got to partner up with somebody new in the kayaks and tents every night, so I was able to form personal connections with each and every girl. It was interesting to see how different each girl was. Some had huge personalities. They would tell you exactly what they were thinking all the time.  While some girls were more shy, go with the flow kind of people.  Some were super positive, and some were more negative, especially when it came to trying new foods.  Each girl was completely different, but when we were put in this group, we all got along so well.  We had this vibe in the group that I have never experienced before.  A few of the girls with big personalities would crack some hilarious jokes, and we would all add to them and laugh about them. We formed many inside jokes between all of us. There was never any time in which any girl felt left out, or there was any drama between the girls.  We all recognized how equal we were in this group, and respected and admired each girl’s differences.  We would often split up into groups of three or four girls, and we had girls that we hung out with more than others, but it never interfered with the group dynamic, there were no cliques that formed.  We worked together as a team, encouraging girls who got tired from kayaking, helping keep the negative ones to stay positive, and giving us some humor when we needed it the most.  Our group had a unique style, that I greatly miss, but is apart of my incredible memory from this trip! I would never had met this incredible group of girls if it wasn’t for our similar love and curiosity of adventure and traveling.

The guides were also beyond helpful and supportive, and it was exciting getting to meet them and know them better! The two ATS leaders, Christine and Gavin, were really great at introducing us in the culture of Greece, giving us enough freedom to roam around towns, but still kept an eye on us, and were always there if anything wrong happened. Our tour guides for the kayaking adventure were some of the coolest people I have ever met. Their names were George and Vanilla.  George was a Greece local, and was able to teach us about authentic Greek culture, while Vanilla was a fantastic kayaker from Sweden always coming up with games for us to play that included everyone and made everyone feel very important.

The last part of our trip was a day of exploring in 100-degree weather in Athens. We shopped for hours and then visited the Acropolis. The exposure to the different culture in the huge city was eye opening and exciting!

Eating the delicious Greek cuisine, discovering the clear blue water, and exploring the unique little towns of Greece are memories I will forever cherish!  It was hard saying goodbye to the friends I made, but I will never forget them. I’m so glad that this was my first adventure out of the country without my family, because I now feel more confident about traveling independently in the future. For I know, there will be many more adventures to come!

***

The “Look Wider” International Travel Scholarships are made possible by the Rae Ann and Richard Dougherty Look Wider International Travel Fund Endowment at Rose Community Foundation. Thanks to this generous commitment, Girl Scouts of Colorado will award scholarships to girls every year.

Learn more about Girl Scout destinations and other international travel at forgirls.girlscouts.org/travel. Applications for destinations travel are due before Thanksgiving each fall. The application for the “Look Wider” International Travel Scholarship is available from November through February and is meant for individual girl travel. Read more about Global Girl Scouting and how to get involved at girlscoutsofcolorado.org/global-girl-scouting.

Top Sellers celebrate at Greeley Stampede

38 Girl Scouts and guests gathered on Saturday, July 1, 2017 at the Greeley Stampede to celebrate Top Sellers who sold 750 packages or more of Girl Scout Cookies during the 2017 Girl Scout Cookie Sale Program. Top Sellers and their guests enjoyed the Stampede’s many attractions and the PRCA Pro Rodeo while also being treated to a BBQ buffet, during which the girls were presented with their Top Seller medallions by the GSCO Product Sales staff. The event was attended by six of the state’s top 100 sellers for the 2017 sale.

 

GSCO offices and shop closures

Girl Scouts of Colorado offices statewide and the shop will be closed July 3-7, 2017 for the Fourth of July. Offices statewide will reopen July 10. The Girl Scouts of Colorado Shop will reopen July 11. Please mark you calendars for some other additional closures:
  • Pikes Peak regional office in Colorado Springs:  July 25
  • Northern & Northeastern CO regional office in  Loveland: July 25 and August 1

Power of Cookie: Girl Scouts visit NYC

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Several girls from Troop 73392 used their cookie money to visit New York City this month. Sophia led her fellow troop members in picking out accommodations, places to eat, and things to see and do in the city.

Highlights included mastering the public transportation system, visiting the National September 11th Museum, the Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island, Coney Island, and eating lots of yummy food.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Gold Award Mentors needed for Northern CO and Pikes Peak regions

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Submitted by GSCO Highest Awards Manager Aimee Bianca

Arguably, the most impactful part of Girl Scouts is the earning of the Girl Scout Gold Award. This prestigious award represents the highest achievement in Girl Scouts and challenges high school girls to initiate meaningful, sustainable change locally, nationally, and/or globally through unique “Take Action” projects of their own creation.
In Colorado, girls work individually with a Gold Award Mentor throughout their Gold Award journey to ensure they are well supported and their projects meet all the standards and expectations of a Gold Award. Mentors are all volunteers who are experts on the Gold Award and sit on their region’s Gold Award Committee in addition to working one on one with Gold Award candidates.

If you are strong woman with project management skills who is interested in building leadership skills with a young woman, you might be the perfect Gold Award Mentor!

Girl Scouts of Colorado needs new Gold Award Mentors in Northern and Northeastern Colorado and the Pikes Peak regions. With more and more girls “going Gold”, we need more mentors to work with candidates one-on-one!

Download and review the full position description and email highestawards@gscolorado.org if you are interested in this exciting volunteer position with Girl Scouts of Colorado.

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