Tag Archives: Northern & Northeastern CO

My Gold Award experience at the Colorado State Capitol

Submitted by Anastasia Rosen

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

On Monday, April 10, 2017, Gold Award recipient Anastasia Rosen attended Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Gold Award Day at the Colorado Capitol. The Kay Rugeley Shaw Gold Travelship helped to support her trip to Denver for this exciting and exclusive event!

Read more about Anastasia’s experience below.

My day at the Colorado State Capitol started out with a breakfast buffet at The University Club and pictures with Girl Scout Gold Award committee. We then walked to the capitol for more pictures on the West staircase. We started our tour of the capitol off in the Old Supreme Court Chamber. We then moved to the floor of The House of Representatives and said the Pledge of Allegiance, then we saw how they voted and passed bills.

After listening to the Representatives, we moved on to Mr. Brown’s attic, which is a really neat museum just below the dome. We toured the dome and took pictures and heard some interesting facts about the building as well as the surrounding suburbs. After coming down from the dome, we toured Mr. Brown’s attic and heard stories as well as some interesting facts about Mr. Brown, his journey into Denver, and the capitol. Throughout the day, I learned a lot of history about the capitol building and Denver itself.

After the tour of Mr. Brown’s attic, we went back to the Old Supreme Court Chambers and heard a great speech from our host, Representative Faith Winter. I had such a great time celebrating my Gold Award achievement with my sister Girl Scouts.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Troop 720 celebrates Earth Day

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Troop 720 of Fort Collins took the chance to celebrate Earth Day and did a trash clean-up at one of our local natural areas. The girls were able to get so much trash. It never ceases to amaze me how much they’re able to clean up there. They’re always happy to do the clean-ups and really feel like they are making a difference.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Register for the “Advanced Outdoor Skills” day camp

Submitted by Theresa Szczurek

Northern & Northeastern CO

Boulder

Are you looking for outdoor adventure? You are in luck! Senior/Ambassador Girl Scout Troop 7 is running an advanced outdoor skills day camp on April 29, 2017 at Mountain View United Methodist Church (355 Ponca Place, Boulder 80303) from 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Fourth Graders and up with prior camping experience will sharpen outdoor skills in first aid, knots, backpacking cooking, safety and set-up, orienteering, and more.

Register NOW:  https://sites.google.com/site/gsoutdoorskillsdayscolorado/

Questions to: girlscouttroop70007@gmail.com

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Taryn Eveland, Longmont, “Hippotherapy Sensory Trail”

Taryn Eveland

What did you do for your Gold Award project?  

My project built a sensory trail on the property of Front Range Hippotherapy (FRH). FRH is a nonprofit therapy center which uses the movements of a horse to address various social, behavioral, and cognitive disabilities.  The sensory trail includes a winding trail through the upper pasture with three permanent stations, each highlighting a different sense, including a mailbox, textile pole, and chimes. While steering the horse though the trail, kids will be required to maintain balance thereby strengthening core muscles that are not normally used. They will also stop at the stations and, while on horseback, perform the tasks required by each station.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience? 

Because the issue I addressed takes time to see improvement, I have not been able to measure it concretely. But, I have provided the therapists with another tool which they can use to help the children progress to more concrete examples.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?  

Front Range Hippotherapy has promised to maintain and add to the trail I’ve created. The materials the stations are made out of are durable and replaceable, and the trail is long enough that if the therapist wants to add more stations she can. This will allow the trail to be used long after my involvement.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection? 

My project serves to show people the importance of nonprofit therapy centers. With recent threats to availability of health insurance, nonprofit therapy organizations are becoming more important for all people. By establishing something for FRH that they were already wanting, free of charge, I am not only helping kids have a more enjoyable and effective experience at hippotherapy, I am also helping them financially and showing the world the importance of healthcare not only to people who are sick, but also to small businesses making a difference.

What did you learn about yourself? 

My project inspired confidence in myself and gave me the knowledge that I can lead when I have to. I also learned the limits of independence. I couldn’t do it all on my own and was required to ask for help, but asking for help is not a sign of weakness in leadership. My project could never have been accomplished if I didn’t have the help of many people. I’ve also realized that helping people brings me great joy, especially people that cause me to value what I have been given in life.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future? 

I am more confident in my skills as a leader. I know I can lead, and I understand how to delegate tasks to accomplish a larger goal. That being said, I still understand the importance of not being a leader all the time. If everyone in my project had tried to lead, I would have had no one to work the augur or collect rocks or take pictures. I understand all the components of a team. Leader is just one part.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I remember the bridging ceremony from Daisy to Brownie and there was one point you have to look in the mirror and see who you see. I think the Gold Award solidifies how much I have grown since then and shows the epitome of who I want to be. It brings the Girl Scout experience full circle.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Clementine Morisette, Fort Collins, “Food Connects Us”

 

Clementine Morisette

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my project, I engineered a community story and sharing board centered around the concepts of food and how it connects us. This was greatly assisted by my mentor, Sierra Tamkun, as well as the management and staff of FoCo cafe.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact in that I was able to see a lot of people add input to the boards as well as share their individual stories. Also, I saw impact in the fact that people will be able to come back and see their stories still up at the permanent display. Some specific note examples include one in which different recipes and their backgrounds were shared, all by a women who felt that these foods were important to her expression of identity. Although her name is not on the notes, you can still see her effect in her input.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Once my part in the project is over, there will be a lasting impact in the community in the form of the finished final display, as well as the impact that the connection and story sharing had on those involved. The final display is up at Foco cafe, where the boards gathered a huge amount of input from patrons.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

There was a global connection in this project as there were many  displays of in terms of  national heritage and influence throughout the project.

What did you learn about yourself?

Through the course of the project, I learned that there is still a lot to learn; I was able to grow as a leader and this experience has shaped me and my future pathway choices.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This will impact me because of the changes in my personality and my newfound acknowledgements of strengths and weaknesses that I had over the course of this project.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

This was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because I was able to see it shaping my decisions in the future, as this organization has shaped my personality and ways in the past. My involvement with the Girl Scouts has been a constant feature in my life since I was quite young. The culmination of my Girl Scout experience being the Gold Award project was meaningful and therefore an important part of my experience in Girl Scouting.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Meadow Mountain Ranch Core Camp 2 offers backpacking option: Still lots of space to register July 21 – 24, 2017

 

Submitted by Penny “Pan” Roberts

Northern & Northeastern CO

Meadow Mountain Ranch

Core Camp at Meadow Mountain Ranch is a “sampler” troop camp program designed for troops and their leaders who wish to experience most of the types of programs that Girl Scout camps have to offer.  This year, a group of trained volunteers is offering Core Camp 1 for less experienced troops for two nights and Core Camp 2 for more experienced troops for three nights at the spectacular high country location near Allenspark, CO.

This year, Core Camp 2 will offer 12-15 girls who have had past camping experience an additional progressive option into the world of backpacking.  CC2 runs from July 21 – 24, 2017 and the backpacking group will be gone from main camp from after lunch on Saturday until before lunch on Sunday.  They will not be leaving the MMR property, but will search out a secluded glade in which to pitch tents, cook out, practice outdoor skills, and have a great overnight with the help of experienced backpacking staff.  No, the girls will not need to provide the specialized gear such as tents, packs, stoves, cook kits, or food.  All they will need is their own sleeping bag, rain gear, clothing, and very minor misc. items for such a short trip.

There will be some special orientation given before they take-off about how to pack, cook out, set up camp, and other skills they will need to give them a compact insight into what could come later as they choose to delve further into the world of backpacking.  Rocky Mountain National Park is out the west boundary of MMR, and no more spectacular options anywhere would await girls or troops or groups when they are ready to explore even further afield.  Take it from me – – – I’m still backpacking after about 55+ years, and I never tire of it.  We’ll be sure the girls have the best possible experience out and about in the woods and under the stars.

There is still room for about 50 more registrants for Core Camp 2, and it is possible to split the troop if not all girls choose the backpacking option.  Some financial aid may be available.  Cookie Credits can be used, and for information or to make your registration, contact meadowmountaincorecamp@gmail.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

 

 

 

Learn about natural resources at the Forestry Field Day

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Submitted by Bob Sturtevant

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

The Society of American Foresters, Colorado State University, and Colorado State Forest Service will host a forestry field day at Ben Delatour Scout Ranch near Red Feather Lakes, Colorado on Saturday, April 22, 2017.

Spend the day learning about the native tree species, how foresters help protect the forest, what are some of the issues our forests are facing, what are some of the many products that come from our forests, and much more. You will see forest management in action as the CSU forestry students cut and having a damaged tree removed from a crowded forest area. Earn your “Tree” Naturalist Legacy badge.

See this attached flyer for more details: 40963104_scout_day_flyer2017-2

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Juliet Spitz, Boulder, “Why Love One and Hurt the Other?”

Juliet Spitz

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

When I went vegan after learning the conditions animals are forced to endure for human use, I knew I wanted to focus my Gold Award project on educating others to inspire them to take action on this issue as well. I created a lesson for young adults to inform them of the conditions animals are forced to endure in factory farms, animal entertainment industries, and animal testing laboratories and provide them with alternatives to supporting these industries. In my lesson, I introduced the audience to the concept of speciesism (discrimination against other species), and I raised thought-provoking questions to encourage the contemplation of why our society values certain species (such as dogs and cats) above others. I presented my lesson to over 80 teenagers and young adults from various groups and clubs. I then posted a video of one of my presentations on YouTube and it is on AnimalActionNetwork.org, and has been shared on multiple Facebook pages.

I know from personal experience that it can be difficult to transition to a diet with fewer animal products, so the second component of my project was creating an email list that anyone can sign up for to receive one vegan recipe per week for eight consecutive weeks to make incorporating more plant-based meals into one’s life easier.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

At the end of each of my presentations, before answering questions from my audience, I asked them one question: “What actions, if any, will you now implement in your lives to help animals?” I was happy to hear a range of answers, from “I will eat less meat” to “I will look for the cruelty-free symbol on body care products.”

How  is your project sustainable? How  will  your  project  continue to impact after your  involvement? 

A video of one of my presentations is posted on YouTube, the homepage of AnimalActionNetwork.org, and numerous Facebook pages. Not only can people continue to view this video in the future, but I hope that the audience members of my presentation will continue to share the information that they learned and inspire others to take action.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have contacted 27 different vegan, vegetarian, and animal rights organizations with a description of my project along with a link to my YouTube video of my presentation. These organizations are all over the nation and world, ranging from Hawaii to Singapore to the Netherlands. Although I didn’t ask for a reply, nine organizations have sent me a response to say that they were glad I had done this project.

What did you learn about yourself?

I honestly didn’t expect to learn much about myself over the course of this project, but I did learn that if I have enough passion for something, I can convince myself to do almost anything that I would normally be too afraid to do. As someone that is normally petrified in front of a crowd, I was surprised that I wanted to pursue a project that required public speaking. Throughout my project, I continually reminded myself of my end goal: to inspire others to better the lives of animals. This simple reminder was enough to encourage me to follow through with my project, even when it was uncomfortable.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

With the confidence, public speaking skills, and knowledge that passion can be a strong motivator, I know I will continue to be an activist for causes I believe in. I know that I have the ability to put together and follow through with a large project and that one person really can make a difference.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Since I became a Girl Scout eight years ago, everything that I’ve done through Girl Scouts has been with my troop— that is, until I pursued my Gold Award. The activities that I had done with my troop, while fun and fulfilling, weren’t necessarily what I would have chosen to do on my own. In addition, when completing a project as a part of a group, I felt less of a responsibility to complete as much of the project, since I felt that the responsibility could be shared among the group members. Completing my Gold Award gave me the opportunity to pursue an issue that I personally had a passion for and that I had full responsibility for.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Troop 720 helps at local food bank

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Some of the girls from Troop 720 spent two and a half hours helping out at a local food bank. We bagged up 1,500 pounds of chocolate in that time for low-resource families. Giving back and service work are so important and a big part of what we do. All the girls love the opportunity to give back to others.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.