Tag Archives: Northern and Northeastern CO

Mission Sisterhood and aMaze! journeys

Submitted by Genia Babyak

Northern and Northeastern CO

Berthoud

Berthoud Girl Scout Senior Troop 71126 is hosting Senior Mission Sisterhood and Cadette aMaze! journeys! Earn your Journey and badge in an easy, fast, and fun way with your sister Girl Scouts! The Senior Mission Sisterhood Journey will focus on personal wellness for every girl and how to achieve your goals. The Cadette aMaze! Journey will focus on the twists and turns of getting along. Both journeys will be FUN!

This event will be held on October 21, 2018 and November 11 (attend only ONE day) from 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. at Berthoud Elementary School. The address is 560 Bunyan Avenue, Berthoud, CO.

Cost is $40 per participant and payment must be made in advance.
Easy registration and payment should be made at:
https://senior-mission-sisterhood-and-cadette-amaze.cheddarup.com

OR make your check out to Girl Scout Troop 71126 and mail it to Megan Courtright, 108 Hummingbird Place, Berthoud, CO 80513. Please specify which Journey you will be taking.

Participants should bring a lunch and snack for this day-long activity.

If you have any questions, please contact Megan at (970) 980-7261 or courtrighttm@gmail.com.

 

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Be a part of history

Submitted by Stacey Tone

Region 7 – Northern & Northeastern CO

Frederick

For their Silver Award Project, Troop 77911 is working with various community agencies to bring the ATTI traveling Vietnam Wall to Dacono, Colorado.

Please join Troop 77911 to be a part of several community events in the Carbon Valley area September 10 – 18, 2016. The public is welcome to attend.

Saturday, September 10, 2016

VFW Post 9741 Monthly Community Breakfast

8 – 11 a.m.

Prairie Greens Clubhouse

7781 Mountain View Drive, Frederick

Sons of The American Legion Squadron 1985 will host a Flag Retirement Ceremony beginning 6 p.m. at Town of Firestone Public Works Facility

7500 County Road 20

Sunday, September 11, 2016

This year marks the 15th anniversary since the attack on America, and each year the Frederick-Firestone Fire Protection District has joined 1st Responders across the country in the “Bells Across America” bell ringing ceremony to remember and honor those lives lost during the attack.

Immediately following the 9/11 Ceremony the Mile of Smiles Lineup will begin along the Frontage Road to greet the Honor Flight Motorcade. Bring your own flag. Line up starts at 8:15 a.m. on the West I-25 Frontage Rd. Meet at the fire station.

Be a part of Northern Colorado’s largest Honor Flight lineup. Join hundreds of supporters at the Mile of Smiles Lineup. Keep the tradition going!

Show your Pride | Show your Respect | Show your Honor

Following the Miles of Smiles join us at Furniture Row to pick up trash and help set up the flag field grid.

September 15 – 18, 2016

The Vietnam Traveling Wall will be on display!

The American Veterans Traveling Tribute Vietnam Wall will be on display at Furniture Row located on the East Frontage Road in Dacono. This 80-percent replica of the Vietnam Wall is 360 feet long and includes every name from the permanent wall in Washington, DC. Don’t miss this opportunity to Honor and Remember our Vietnam heroes.

Opening Ceremony is Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016 at 1 p.m.

National Anthem

Prayer by Military Chaplin

Speeches by Military Dignitaries

Flyover

Active Military, Veterans, and 1st Responders

Seating will be available for elderly and disabled

Reading of the names on the Wall will begin at 2 p.m. opening day and will be read until 8 p.m. each night the Wall is on display. We still need volunteers to read. The Wall will remain on display until Sunday, September 18, 2016Closing Ceremony will begin at 3 p.m.

If you would like to volunteer or would like more information please visit www.ColoradoRemembers.com or email gstroop77911@gmail.com

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Recipients Honored at Highest Awards celebration in Boulder

More than fifty Girl Scout families and friends gathered at Mountain View Methodist Church in Boulder on April 24, 2016 to honor Colorado Girl Scouts who earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

Two Girl Scouts were presented the Gold Award, the highest honor a Girl Scout can earn. Brittany Jaros from Boulder, Holy Family High School, developed a program to educate middle school students about the importance of mental health and suicide prevention. Courtney Howell from Niwot, Silver Creek High School, organized a science, math, and engineering exploration day for middle and elementary school students to show them that science can be fun. Both described their projects and how earning the Gold Award has impacted their lives. Girl Scouts in grades 9-12 who earn the Gold Award demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. Several Silver Award honorees (the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn) also were presented their awards. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in grades 4th and 5th can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado COO Jacky Noden said the girls’ spirit and motivation inspires us all to think of the needs of others and take action to make the world a better place.

“You are strong role models for our community and our world,” she said.

Kaitlin Jaros, whose sister Brittany accepted her Gold Award, served as the celebration’s emcee. She earned her Gold Award several years ago for a project that focused on three areas of health: eating, exercise, and getting enough sleep. She teamed up with gym and health teachers at Casey Middle School, Sacred Heart of Jesus, and St. Louis middle schools. The teachers had students track for a week their food intake and the number of hours of exercise and sleep they completed. She took the data and created spreadsheets, showing where students could improve. She presented the information at each of the schools, explaining the importance of forming healthy habits early.

“Girl Scouts has ultimately shaped me into the person I am today by instilling values of courage, confidence, and character, ultimately giving us the mission to make the world a better place.” she said.

This year Girl Scouts across the country are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts’ highest award. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Girl Scouts of Colorado will continue to honor this year’s Highest Awards recipients at ceremonies around the state. These events include:

  • May 1st at 2 p.m. at the Denver Marriott Tech Center, 4900 S. Syracuse St., Denver
  • May 6 at 6 p.m. at the Penrose House Garden Pavilion 1661 Mesa Ave., Colorado Springs

 

 

 

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Fort Collins

 

More than one hundred Girl Scout families and friends gathered at the Fort Collins Marriott on April 17, 2016 to honor Colorado Girl Scouts who earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

Two Girl Scouts were presented the Gold Award, the highest honor a Girl Scout can earn. Brittany Jaros from Boulder, Holy Family High School, developed a program to educate middle school students about the importance of mental health and suicide prevention. Emily Mohlis from Elizabeth, Elizabeth High School and a current freshman at University of Colorado in Greeley, organized the music, school-owned instruments, and accessories scattered throughout the band room and director’s office at her school. Both described their projects and how earning the Gold Award has impacted their lives.

Girl Scouts in grades 9-12 who earn the Gold Award demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. Several Bronze Award honorees (the highest award a girl in grades 4-5 can earn) and Silver Award honorees (the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn) also were presented their awards.

Girl Scouts of Colorado CEO and President Stephanie Foote said the girls’ spirit and motivation inspires us all to think of the needs of others and take action to make the world a better place.

“You are strong role models for our community and our world,” she said.

Jessica Hild served as the celebration’s emcee. She earned her Gold Award in February 2015 for a project to renovate the chapel at Camp Alexander, a Boy Scout camp in Colorado. In addition to inspiring girls in the audience with her Gold Award story and how it continues to have a positive impact on her life, she also challenged girls to not let this be the end of their work to make a difference in their communities and around the world.

“Will you also be sustainable? Will you continue to reach for leadership and influence? Will you continue on to be the brains behind another project?” she asked.

This year Girl Scouts across the country are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts’ highest award. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Girl Scouts of Colorado will continue to honor this year’s Highest Awards recipients at ceremonies around the state. These events include:

  • April 22nd at 6 p.m. at Center for American Values, 101 S. Main St. #100, Pueblo
  • April 24th at 2 p.m. Mountain View Methodist, 355 Ponca Pl., Boulder
  • April 24th at 2 p.m. Colorado Mesa University, 1100 North Ave., Grand Junction
  • May 1st at 2 p.m. at the Denver Marriott Tech Center, 4900 S. Syracuse St., Denver
  • May 6 at 6 p.m. at the Penrose House Garden Pavilion 1661 Mesa Ave., Colorado Springs

 

 

Emily Krizmanich awarded Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship

Emily Krizmanich

Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to announce Emily Krizmanich is the 2016 recipient of the Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship. Emily, who is from Howard, Colo., is a lifetime Girl Scout, Gold Awardee and recipient of a Look Wider International Travel Scholarship. She was also a member of Johanna’s troop. Emily is currently a sophomore at the University of Colorado in Boulder where she is majoring in International Affairs and Anthropology. She hopes to one day join the Peace Corps or become a college professor. Emily plans to use the $600 in prize money for education at CU or to study aboard.

Emily earned her Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts, in 2013. She worked to educate others about the importance of recycling and waste management by placing recycling bins for fishing line at parks in the Salida-Buena Vista area. Emily credits her success in earning her Gold Award to Johanna. Emily said as her troop leader, Johanna helped guide through the Gold Award process and encouraged her every step of the way. “Receiving this scholarship is kinda like her way of looking down at me, pushing me, encouraging me to still achieve my goals—just like she did with my Gold Award,” Emily said.

Johanna Farrar’s husband and children started this scholarship in 2015 to celebrate all of her accomplishments, particularly those within the Girl Scout community. Born in London, England, raised in a small village on the south coast of England, Johanna was a Girl Guide in her childhood. She was also the youngest ever to have achieved the Queen’s Guide Award at that time, the English equivalent of a Gold Award.  After earning a software engineering degree from Loughborough University, Johanna moved to New Jersey to work for Bell Labs. In 1985, she accepted a position with FedEx in Colorado Springs, where she met and married Gene Farrar in 1990. Johanna and Gene lived and worked in the Colorado Springs area, moving to Monument in 1992 when their oldest daughter, Hannah was born. In 1995, after their second daughter, Rachel’s birth, Johanna retired from a successful career as a Technical Advisor at FedEx for an even more successful and rewarding career as a dedicated full-time mother.

Johanna introduced her daughters to Girl Scouts at the first opportunity and became a local leader in Monument, then again after relocating to Buena Vista.  When Johanna first arrived in Buena Vista, she learned Girl Scouts had all but disappeared in Chaffee County. Johanna believed so strongly in the values and skills that scouting develops, it became a passion to reestablish scouting for girls in the high Rockies. Known to many of her friends as the “Engergizer Bunny” because of her seemingly never-ending energy and indomitable spirit, Johanna provided the leadership and drive to rejuvenate scouting in the valley. Now, for the first time, there are troops for all ages.  Additionally, Johanna loved the outdoors, including skiing, hiking, biking, mountain climbing, and especially gardening – passions she loved to share and instill in young women.

 

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Emma Hassman, Erie, “A Children’s Garden for Black Rock”

Hassman_Emma[5]

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project I, with the help of the students and parents of Black Rock Elementary, created a garden.  This included removing weeds and old dirt from previous attempts to set up this sort of project.  I had to get in contact with the Grounds Lead for the school district to have them remove the weeds and dirt because it was too big of a job for the team I had. I also had to go and get plants and other material donated from stores like Home Depot and Lowe’s to fill the garden.  Finally, I recruited students and parents to come and help with most of the planting.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my garden with how many students and parents I was able to get involved.  I am also measuring in how available the garden is to students.  The garden will be taken care of in part by students, along with a parent group, and will be available for classes to use.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustained through two groups, one of students who will be part of a class that will be learning about plants and gardening.  The other is the Black Rock PTO, who has agreed to maintain funding for materials.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global/national connection for my project is a website I created which can be reached here: Black Rock Children’s Garden. This will allow people to have access to what I did and advice on creating a garden for schools and communities for themselves.

What did you learn about yourself?

I developed confidence in talking to people and being in a position of authority.  As I went through the process of gathering materials and help I became more confident and it became easier to communicate with people.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

It will help me to be able to afford a higher education, which will increase opportunity in the future.  This project has also helped me develop skills that will help in the future with jobs and being in leadership jobs.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

This was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it was a big commitment that I had to follow through with and allowed me to use the skills previously developed through my Bronze and Silver Awards, skills such as perseverance, communication and dedication.  These will help me to be able to navigate complicated situations as an adult.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Brittany Jaros, Boulder, “Mission: Suicide Prevention”

Jaros_Brittany

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a presentation about suicide prevention for middle school aged students at two Catholic middle schools, Holy Trinity and St. Louis. Along with the presentation, I had the kids participate in a workshop where they put their sources of strength on a posterboard and we hung them around the school. I also created a website, http: wix.com/hope-strength to help spread my work to others. I also handed out stickers with the Sources of Strength wheel with my website domain on the back. The Sources of Strength wheel included family support, positive friends, mentors, healthy activities, generosity, spirituality, medical access, and mental health. Experts say if you have at least two of these sources of strength you will reduce your risk of experiencing depression and/or suicide.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I gave the kids an evaluation sheet asking them specific questions about the project and how I can change it. Most of the responses were positive and indicated the kids learned new things from my project.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The posters will continue to hang up around the schools. One of the teachers, Tate Hallahan at Holy Trinity, agreed to integrate an aspect of my project into a daily activity. The kids normally do a Life Balance Program called 4-7-40, Four Aspects of Human Awareness (Physical, Spiritual, Mental, Emotional) 7 – Seven Goals – Specific and Attainable / Pertain to the 4 Aspects. Before my project the activity was 3-7-40. He added the mental aspect after I came to the school. Also, he took the stickers I handed out with my website domain to handout to his students in the future. The kids will also continue to visit my website.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I emailed four organizations: Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, National Association of France-Depression, European Depression Organization, and Mental Health of America. Lori Salgado from the Board of Directors with DBSA Colorado responded and encouraged me about my project.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned I have the strength to persevere through any difficulties and I can finish anything I set my mind too. I discovered I am a good leader and I love working with middle school students.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Standing up in front of people and discussing a tough topic. I also learned to be brave and stand up for a topic I believe in even when others don’t see it as important . This will help me in the future when I have to give presentations in the business world and I’m comfortable with public speaking. I will also have the confidence to stand up for issues in the community and the world and address them.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

It was the final project and endpoint of my journey as a younger Girl Scout. It has given me the helpful tools to continue Girl Scouts in the future. It helped me to achieve the final leadership tools I need to succeed in college, the business world, and as a future Girl Scout. Without these final tools I would not be as confident in myself before I enter the world.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kimberly Levine, Longmont, “Food Drives to Save Lives”

Kimberly Levine

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

In an effort to spread awareness of hunger within the community, as well as to rally others around helping fight hunger, I created a food drive tutorial. The tutorial was geared toward English and Spanish-speaking communities who were interested in making a difference.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The impact of this project can be measured through the amount of views the tutorial receives on media platforms, such as YouTube. If more people in a community see the video, food banks could receive more donations. The video stressed the necessity of food donations, so the video’s capability to inspire is great.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

This project will be sustained through the media platforms which support my video. Both the English and Spanish videos have been posted on YouTube and my local food bank has been provided with necessary information to access and upload the videos to their website. These videos will be accessible for all future generations, so people can watch it and be inspired to help for many years to come.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The video was translated into Spanish so that two separate dialects would be able to understand the message of how to fight hunger. The videos were also sent to the National Home Owners Association so that HOAs all over the United States could have knowledge and access to the tutorial. In addition, a local food bank has access to distribute the video to other HOAs and people who are looking for ways to help out.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I still have a lot of work to do on my leadership skills. This project helped me identify all of the areas that I need to work on, such as public speaking and time management. Throughout the process of the project, I was able to work harder on skills that I was lacking.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I know that I will continue to grow as a leader. This project has really shown me that the best leaders are always evolving and that it’s impossible to know exactly how to lead a group at all times. I was able to learn a lot about group dynamics and how to effectively communicate what I needed as far as directing the video. Also, I learned a lot about the importance of time management, I will continue to work on developing this essential skill.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award provided an excellent culmination of all of the lessons I had learned through my Bronze and Silver Awards. I thought it was an excellent way to wrap up my Girl Scouting career before I graduate high school. This experience allowed me to really dig deep and execute a project that will actually make a difference in the world. I am very proud of my hard work and the final product.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Longmont Girl Scouts celebrate earning New Cuisines badge

Cadette Troop 73392 of Longmont hosted a potluck dinner Sunday to celebrate earning the New Cuisines badge. To earn this badge, Girl Scouts must sample dishes, which are from another:

  1. Country
  2. Region of the United States
  3. Time period

They must also try a dish that “makes a statement.”

Troop Leader Sharon Manning wanted her girls to take this badge one step further. Instead of simply trying each one of these dishes, the girls had to make all four of them and then present them at a potluck dinner. It wasn’t an easy task. However, in the end, the girls learned not only about cooking, but about themselves and their family’s heritage.

Bebe, who is Asian-American, made a traditional Taiwanese noodle-dish. She also cooked sweet-potato chips, an interesting twist on the popular sweet potato fry. Along with the help of her mother, Ashley made homemade bread. The two used an old family recipe and tips and tricks passed down for generations.

Earning the New Cuisines badge is just the beginning for this troop. They have many more exciting activities planned for the 2015-16 Girl Scout year, including hosting the Second Annual Holiday Bazaar on November 21 in Longmont.

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Courtney Howell, Niwot, “STEAM Day”

Courtney Howell

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

For my Gold Award project, I held a science, math, and engineering exploration day for middle and elementary school kids in my local area at my high school, to show them that science can be fun! The event consisted of 22 hands-on activities and learning displays that were designed to be fun, interactive, and educational, while encouraging kids to get interested and involved in STEM. Activities ranged from a wide variety of different science and engineering topics, and I had 16 different science and engineering organizations involved in the event, either by running a booth or by donating materials for an activity. The impact I had hoped to make, was to share the “wonder” of science and provide the opportunity for elementary and middle school children, to discover a passion or appreciation for science through hands-on activities.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I created a survey and had attendees fill it out rating their experience at the event, as well as specific aspects of the event to quantitatively measure the impact of my project, on my target audience. Comments from the surveys were incredibly positive, with the majority saying that the event was well done and a great opportunity that kids absolutely loved. Even before I tallied and analyzed the data, I could tell by how bustling the event was, how many kids I saw smiling, and deeply engaged in the various activities, that the event was a success.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

My project will be sustained beyond my involvement by a group of leaders at my high school, who will take over the event by running it again next year. To help them get started, I provided a list of contacts and activities I used in my project. I also compiled this information into a “manual” of where to start in organizing the event, and mailed this manual to different schools around the state to allow other schools to run the event, something similar, or just to use its activities for teaching and spreading the fun of science and engineering.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

STEM programs are important in furthering national wellbeing and technology, but there are areas of the U.S., and worldwide, that don’t have as many opportunities to expose kids to STEM and getting them interested in science and engineering. Polls done by the National Science Foundation in 2011,  report that nationwide only 34% of 8th grade students performed at or above the proficient level in math, and only 40% of 4th graders nationwide performed at or above the proficient level. Math and science are important for innovation and progress, yet so many students nationwide struggle because they do not have the opportunities to learn and discover STEM in an engaging way.

My event, STEAM Day, can also link nationally because it will be repeated next year and can also be put on by other schools or organizations. From Silver Creek High School, the STEAM Day can spread to other schools in the district, then from one school district to another. It can grow/spread from Longmont to another town in Colorado, and from other towns in Colorado to another state and later another. I have started a chain of potential STEAM Days that I hope will spread far beyond my local community.

What did you learn about yourself?

By completing my Gold Award project, I realized just how capable I am. Going into the project, I had some doubts about whether I could get it done in time or even if I had the motivation to complete the project, but I learned that I am motivated and capable. While the event came together a little last-minute for some things, I was able to put together a successful event with myself as the leader, proving to myself that I am a capable young woman who can achieve anything, even difficult, if I put my mind to it.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The practical life skills, such as time management, networking, and project management skills, I gained from doing this project will be invaluable for my future. Both in college and a prospective future career in genetic research, I will have to organize and execute large-scale research projects, which will require many of the same steps and skills as my Gold Award project did. Because of this, my leadership skills will continue to grow and improve as I identify topics of research interest, plan, and execute research, as part of or leading a team, that can hopefully help the greater community.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience? 

The Gold Award was a great way to use and refine the skills I had begun to develop through my 13 years in Girl Scouts. From selling cookies to going to camp, Girl Scouts introduces important skills, like networking, planning, and fundraising and these skills get put to practical use, as well as become improved, when you do your Gold Award.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org