Tag Archives: National Volunteer Appreciation Month

Volunteer Spotlight: Dezire Sanchez

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Dezire Sanchez of Greeley in the Northern and Northeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Dezire to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

When my daughter was in kindergarten, we were at a UNC football game and they advertised a Girl Scout event in conjunction with UNC. My daughter was interested in the event, so we decided to give Girl Scouts try and registered, so that she could attend the event. We did not have plans on continuing after that year, but we quickly discovered the joy that Girl Scouts brought both of us. At the end of her first year, I decided to take a leader role as I was excited that we had found something that we both enjoyed. When I signed her up, I had no idea of the journey that I we were about to begin.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Currently, I have the following volunteer roles within Girl Scouts: member of the service unit team, service unit fall product program manager, troop leader, troop fall product program manager, and troop cookie manager. When I became involved in the troop my daughter joined, I had no idea that I myself would become a Girl Scout. I have greatly appreciated each of these roles as they have helped me learn and experience being a Girl Scout. I have also made many new friends and have witnessed the kindness and welcoming that I all hope each Girl Scout feels throughout their journey. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that you can become a Girl Scout at any age. I have also learned so much from dealing with the challenges of time management and going outside of my own comfort levels to being a good role model for these girls. I have learned that no matter how hard or rough of a week I am having I will have one uninterrupted hour that I will dedicate to the girls. I have learned to look at the world through their eyes and their hearts and appreciate the compassion and drive they have. I have learned more from these girls than I could have imagined. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

My hope is that the girls continue to always choose kindness and that we always leave the places and people better than we found them. I hope that these girls continue to gain confidence in their abilities, skills, and knowledge to reach their goals. I also hope that they have the courage to continue to try new things and always seek adventure.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

When I began this journey, I would not have expected my experiencing to be anything other than a leader. Oh to look back and realize how incorrect my thoughts were. As a volunteer, I am a G.I.R.L. I am a go-getter most during cookie season. I work with the girls to create a plan that will motivate them to sell cookies and help them understand the commitment they will need to reach their cookie goals. I am an innovator while planning our meetings and activities. I am a risk-taker when we are camping. To be honest, I have never been “outdoorsy,” so this was always a big deal for me. However, camping has quickly become an activity that my daughter and I enjoy tremendously. I fulfill my leader role within service unit level and am truly amazed by all of the wonderful troop leaders I have come to know through our service unit. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Marie Williams

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Marie Williams of Golden in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Marie to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer in 2016, when my daughter Caley started kindergarten, because it was a great opportunity for us to spend meaningful time together. We have fun, explore new things, and learn important life lessons. I have stayed a volunteer — and gotten more involved — for those same reasons, and also because I have found personal fulfillment in my volunteer work. Working with girls, and seeing them learn and grow, fills me with pride and is one of the ways I am making the world a better place.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I am currently a troop leader and troop cookie manager for my daughter’s second-grade Brownie troop; the service unit manager and service unit product program manager for Hills and Dales in Golden; and I serve on the Membership Connection Committee. I have been a troop leader since the beginning, along with my fabulous co-leader, Courtney Fox. I took on the service unit manager role in 2017 because our area did not have an operating service unit, and I saw the huge potential in having experienced leaders as a resource for all of our newer leaders. We continue to work on growing our service unit to make it a source of help and inspiration for all. I took on the product program roles in 2017 because I had a vision of how to make them run more smoothly. Most recently, I joined the Membership Connection Committee last fall because it allows me to communicate feedback between GSCO and the Girl Scouts in my area, and also allows me to contribute to the discussion about and development of our Girl Scouting program for the future. (And I also work full-time and have a three-year-old son, if you were wondering!)

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Though not a new lesson, my Girl Scout volunteer work reminds me of the incredible diversity of life experiences and personalities in the world, including in a group of seven-year-olds! I have learned that, although not every girl’s family can contribute as much time as I can, they all have something important to contribute to the girls’ experience. One of the most important jobs I have as a leader is to bring together their diverse talents and experiences for the benefit of all of our daughters. I also have learned that, when you truly love what you are doing, it never feels like a burden. Even during those dark days of cookie booth sales when you can’t figure out where that other case of Thin Mints went, it is merely a task to be completed, and not something that weighs on you. I am passionate about the Girl Scout experience, and committed to seeking out new ways for all girls to benefit from it.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls are learning a ton! My co-leader and I work hard to provide our girls with a variety of creative opportunities to learn about the world around them. With our girls in second grade, our primary focus is on exposing them to things they might not learn about in school or in daily home life. Whether we’re building roller coasters or race cars for a STEM badge; exploring different arts through pottery, painting, and performing; climbing a rock wall; camping for the first time; learning how to talk to our cookie customers; stocking donated food on the shelves at a food pantry; or visiting a hangar at Centennial Airport and learning about Flight for Life — we’re showing them the vast opportunities available to them in their world. And throughout, we emphasize the specific lines of the Girl Scout Law. More than just something to memorize, we want it to be something they understand and live by.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

The biggest change I’ve seen is that my volunteer experience has made me a more confident innovator. In both our troop and our service unit, if I see something that’s not working, I have the freedom to try new things, experiment, and find something that works better. Through these experiences, I have become more confident in my abilities to develop solutions that work for groups of all sizes.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

A special message to GSCO Girl Scout volunteers

From Stephanie A. Foote, President & CEO of Girl Scouts of Colorado

You may not wear a mask or a cape, but your uncanny ability to help girls charge toward their destinies is nothing short of super!

We’re continually wowed and humbled by our volunteers’ collective super powers. Being a Girl Scout volunteer isn’t always easy, and we can’t thank you enough for the energy, positivity, and love you give every day. (Don’t think we didn’t notice!).

As we celebrate Volunteer Appreciation Month, we want you to know that you are the reason Girl Scouts continues to be the best leadership development program for girls. You open the doors of possibility for millions of girls who will make the world a better place—— and that’s real power.

Because the work you do with girls is not just for a better today but also ensures the best tomorrow, Girl Scouts of Colorado has made a donation to the Restoring Colorado’s Forest Fund in YOUR HONOR. Our partnership with the Colorado State Forest Service is a perfect fit. The gift of seedling trees to be planted in areas impacted by wildfires and other natural disasters will make a difference for generations to come.

From the bottom of our hearts, thank you from all of us at Girl Scouts of Colorado.

Watch the video

Celebrate World Environment Day

Girl Scouts, families, and friends are invited to celebrate World Environment Day at Meadow Mountain Ranch on Sunday, June 16.

In partnership with the Colorado State Forest Service, Girl Scouts of Colorado is excited to offer members a way to focus on and celebrate the environment. World Environment Day is a global occasion to highlight and discus the importance of environmental awareness and action. When celebrating World Environment Day, Girl Scouts honor Juliette Gordon Low’s legacy, by promoting respect and love of the great outdoors far and wide. Through Girl Scouting, girls see the earth as their home. Whether they’re learning about endangered wildlife, developing creative recycling projects, or working toward a grade-level award, girls focus on care, conservation, and responsibility. They make sure the beauty and wonder of our planet endure for future generations to enjoy.

Girls will have the opportunity to participate in several activities across the camp property throughout the day. The event is open-house style and you’re welcome to come for the whole event, or part of it, and participate in whichever activities interest you.

Learn more

Celebrating you dedication

Throughout April, Girl Scout lifetime membership will be available at a special 50% discount—— from $400 down to $200—— for volunteers who have served for ten years or more.

Lifetime membership is an investment that ensures girls have a place to reach their full potential and grow into the courageous leaders we need—— now and always. When you upgrade to lifetime membership through myGS in April, you can expect:

  • Continuous membership in Girl Scouts
  • $25 of your dues to fund one year of Girl Scout membership for an underserved girl from Girl Scouts of Colorado
  • A lifetime membership card and pin
  • 10% off Girl Scout merchandise purchased from girlscoutshop.com
  • An invitation to join an annual call hosted by GSUSA’s CEO
  • A monthly enewsletter

Thank you for your years of service and all you’ve done to help create the next generation of female leaders. We couldn’t do it without you!

Become a lifetime member

Volunteer Spotlight: Sheri Coy

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Sheri Coy of Hesperus in the Southwestern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Sheri to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have a daughter and we moved to a new place where she had to make new friends out in the country. I came across Girl Scouts at her then school and saw it as a great opportunity for her to make new friends and experience new accomplishments that she does not learn from just going to school. I put her in the group and started to volunteer as a way for us to spend time together and make lasting memories.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I currently volunteer with being the leader of our troop. I have also been a troop cookie manager, as well as active in our service unit. I volunteer with the cookie program, organizing a place for delivery and troop breakdown of cookies. I try to get as much opportunity as I can to give my time to the benefit of the girls. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

This question is very complex. I have learned so much about personalities, and scheduling, as well as conflict resolution, and fun enriched challenges. Everyday I feel I learn something new within all Girl Scouts has to offer. Implementing badges and teaching our multi-troop with many levels has challenges of its own. I have built lasting friendships from endeavors that the girls and I have learned through. I have learned things that as a girl growing up I didn’t have the opportunity to learn, money management, relationships, decision making, as well as life lessons.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls learn how be true to the Girl Scout Promise and Law, build lasting friendships, and to make the world a better place, as well as have enrichment skills to last a lifetime. I want them to be proud of themselves and enjoy life to its fullest. I want them to know they make a difference and to have the confidence to do it.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

As I sit here, I am seeing that I started with G.I.R.L. backwards, lol. I became a leader of a wonderful troop and had to take risks with the girls to help them to learn. I became a innovator with the STEM movement and then on to a go-getter. This year during cookie season, we all took a risk to better our cookie sales by innovating a sales pitch. We took all the cookie flavors and put them in a dish filled with epoxy resin to set in front of the cookies on our booth. Our hopes were that it would be eye popping and grab the attention of the customers. Long story short, it worked! It was our most talked about part of the program, and next year, we plan to enhance it more by tweaking the corks we noticed from a first draft project. That used all aspects of  G.I.R.L.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Happy National Volunteer Appreciation Month!

Without YOU, there is no US! So, thank YOU! Because of you we’re able to build girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place and prepare them for a lifetime of leadership, success, and adventure.  Although everything girls do in Girl Scouts is girl-led, mentors like you make all the difference in the quality of a girl’s experience and the amazing things she learns she is capable of accomplishing.

No cape required: Girl Scout volunteers are everyday superheroes who make a real impact! During Volunteer Appreciation Month and every day after, we thank you for all the AMAZING work you do!

Because the work you do with girls is not just for a better today but also ensures the best tomorrow, Girl Scouts of Colorado has made a donation to the Restoring Colorado’s Forest Fund in YOUR HONOR. Our partnership with the Colorado State Forest Service is a perfect fit. The gift of seedling trees to be planted in areas impacted by wildfires and other natural disasters will make a difference for generations to come.

Together, we are preparing our girls to lead, and we will see them make a difference in their world. This gift too will continue to grow and make an impact on our future.

Watch to learn more about the impact of the gift made in your honor.

Honor a Girl Scout volunteer this month

Know a Girl Scout volunteer who inspires your girl to dream bigger? Who offers endless encouragement? Whatever your favorite Girl Scout volunteer’s superpower may be, let them know you appreciate everything they do!

You can show the love all month long with these great ideas and e-card templates.

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Brenda Fry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Brenda Fry of Severance in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is a retired troop leader, current service unit manager, service unit cookie manager, and service unit recruitment manager. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Brenda to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a volunteer to be involved in my daughter’s troop and to help fill the need for volunteers, as I know how important Girl Scouting is for our younger generation being a Girl Scout myself.  

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I originally started as a support volunteer for the troop and assisting at a couple of day camps that our service unit sponsored. I then became a troop co-leader onto a troop leader and then as I saw our service unit struggle with structure, I accepted the position of service unit manager not only for 726 Windsor/Severance, but also 704 Eaton/Ault/Nunn/Pierce. I also had accepted the positions of service unit fall program manager and service unit cookie manager for both service units.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

As a volunteer, you have some many contacts not only with each troop but also within your region. You as a volunteer can assist with the success of the troops in your area. I also try to be supportive of not only the troops I work with, but also GSCO as we try to pass along the information to our troop leaders or leadership team to share with their parents/girls. Volunteers can also be key resources in assisting girls in obtaining their Gold Awards, which is the highest award in Girl Scouts.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I feel it is important to the girls build their confidence, character, and courage. These are some of the core elements that Girl Scouts want to help teach girls. By the girls participating in product programs, it helps them to build their confidence and find the courage to talk to adults and have a meaningful conversation about their goals and what they are doing to achieve those goals. I also enjoy watching the girls grow and become their own person with great ideas and want to be a role model to younger Girl Scouts.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

By being a volunteer with Girl Scouts, it has helped me step out of my comfort zone and find ways to get the troop leaders or troop leadership team on board to participate in the product programs and to want to expand our girl membership in both service units that I work with. I am working with council on ways to not only retain our current volunteers, but to also find ways to recruit new girls. While recruiting new girls we don’t necessarily increase numbers in existing troops, but to start new troops with the support to be successful. We are looking at possibly partnering new troops with existing troops in a mentor type way so they would be able to have a direct contact of someone who probably has gone through some of the same challenges they are facing and find answers that could work.  

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Four awesome ways to thank your Girl Scout volunteer

From Girl Scouts of the USA

April is National Volunteer Month! Celebrate your favorite Girl Scout volunteers with these thoughtful ideas! Whether you choose to do one activity or all, you’re sure to make the volunteers in your life feel loved and appreciated and remember all the reasons why they continue to give their time and hearts to the Girl Scout mission.

1. Send a personalized ecard! Who doesn’t love a fun ecard? This month, show the Girl Scout volunteer in your life—your Girl Scout VIP!—just how much they mean to you by choosing from one of four awesome predesigned ecard templates. Just fill in the blank to finish the sentence (keep it short and sweet, please!) and share your ecard with them on Facebook, on Twitter, or by email—SWEET! Get started.

2. Shout them out on social media! What better way to make your favorite Girl Scout volunteer feel special than to shout ‘em out for the world to know? They’re the best, and you’re proud to say it loud and clear: I love my Girl Scout volunteer!

During National Volunteer Week (April 15–21), head on over to your favorite social media pages and share why this volunteer (or volunteers!) is so special to you. Make sure to tag @girlscouts and include the hashtag #NVW2018 so we can follow the love.

3. Write them a handwritten letter! That’s right. Imagine their surprise when they open their mailbox and find an old-school letter from you. Need a little inspiration? Here are a few things you could include:

  • Why your favorite Girl Scout volunteer is so special?
  • An especially memorable time when you were happy to have their guidance and support/
  • How they have made a difference in your life?
  • Your three favorite things about them.

4. Buy them something special with this offer from the Girl Scout Shop! During April, use code VOLUNTEER18 for 15% off* one item from our online store, the Girl Scout Shop, and bring a smile to a volunteer’s face with a fun little token of your appreciation.

Know someone who isn’t a Girl Scout volunteer but would make a great one? Use one (or more!) of these thoughtful appreciation ideas to let them know how they could make a lasting difference in girls’ lives today!

*The code is active April 1 through April 30, 2018, for 15% off one item from a customer’s order. The 15% discount will be applied to the highest priced item in an order. If a customer buys two or more of the same item that the discount applies to, the 15% will only be taken off one item. The code is for one-time use per customer, online only at girlscoutshop.com.