Tag Archives: National Volunteer Appreciation Month

Donations provide seedling trees for post-fire restoration

Submitted by Ryan Lockwood, Colorado State Forest Service

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

With the scars of destructive 2018 wildfires still highly visible throughout Colorado, and affected families still working toward recovery, many in the state want to know what they can do to help. One way to have a positive impact on affected forests and communities is through the replanting of trees, which is the goal of the donor-driven Restoring Colorado’s Forests Fund.

Donations made to the Colorado State Forest Service-administered fund are used to provide seedlings for planting in areas impacted by wildfires, floods or other disasters, with an emphasis on areas critical to water protection, wildlife habitat and public benefit. Every $2 donation to the fund purchases one seedling, at no cost to the landowner. Since the CSFS established the program in 2003, its nursery has used program funds to provide more than 122,000 trees.

“Planting trees provides an important means to help stabilize soils, protect water supplies and restore the landscape as we address the long-term recovery of our communities and forests,” said Mike Lester, state forester and CSFS director.

The CSFS nursery in Fort Collins grows all the seedling trees for the program, to ensure that only those best adapted to local conditions are used for restoration efforts.

This year, the CSFS received an $11,000 donation to the Restoring Colorado’s Forests Fund from the Girl Scouts of Colorado, in honor of the organization’s volunteers. The donation, which represents the second large contribution from GSCO in the last two years, is intended to amplify the organization’s impacts toward reforestation efforts in Colorado.

“In recognition of all the amazing things that our volunteers do, we chose the gift of trees that will also have a lasting and positive impact by helping to restore forested areas in our beautiful state,” said Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie A. Foote.

The CSFS and Girl Scouts of Colorado continue building on a partnership largely intended to help youth gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of trees and forests in Colorado. As part of this effort, in June CSFS staff partnered with GSCO to help educate hundreds of Girl Scouts and their parents about forestry, the environment and related careers at a World Environment Day event at the Meadow Mountain Ranch near Allenspark.

In the past decade, the Restoring Colorado’s Forests Fund has used donations from individuals and organizations like GSCO for replanting efforts, in locations that include the burn scars of the High Park Fire west of Fort Collins, the Waldo Canyon Fire near Colorado Springs and the Weber Fire near Durango. Following those fires, the loss of trees and other vegetation led to significant runoff and erosion – resulting in damaged hillsides, polluted waterways, highway closures and road damage.

The CSFS has intentionally delayed providing trees from the fund for replanting efforts this year, to allow time to first evaluate natural recovery from the 2018 fires. Over the fall and winter, after seeing how burned areas have recovered, the CSFS will assess applications from affected landowners and provide trees to recipients early in 2020.

To make a donation directly to the Restoring Colorado’s Forests Fund, visit https://advancing.colostate.edu/RestoringColoradosForests.

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The Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS) provides professional forestry assistance, wildfire mitigation expertise and outreach and education to help landowners and communities achieve their forest management goals. The CSFS is a service and outreach agency of the Warner College of Natural Resources at Colorado State University and provides staffing for the Division of Forestry within the Colorado Department of Natural Resources. For more information, visit csfs.colostate.edu.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. Girl Scouts offers every girl a chance to practice a lifetime of leadership, adventure, and success. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Vicki Tussey

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Vicki Tussey of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Vicki to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a volunteer in 2013 when my youngest daughter was a Daisy. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started off as a co-leader for the Daisies in Troop 3893. I would plan the meetings and run the activities for the Daisies. I was a co-leader for two years before changing Girl Scout troops. In 2015, I became a co-leader for Troop 4000. My role within Troop 4000 was to help out with the activities and chaperoning on field trips. Then in 2016, my daughters joined Troop 2821. In that troop, I helped out as one of the cookie managers within our troop. In 2017, I became the service unit manager for Service Unit 22. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

As a parent of a Girl Scout, I never knew how much the leaders and the co-leaders did for the girls. It wasn’t until I became a co-leader myself did I realize how important the role was. 

I have learned how important it is to work one-on-one with each of the girls, be there for them, and take the time to listen and answer any questions they have. 

The hardest role I ever had was being one of the cookie managers. I learned how to be patient with the parents and understanding when financial issues came up.

As a service unit manager, I’ve learned it’s important to be available to provide resources and answer any questions a leader or co-leader may have. It’s also important to plan a monthly meeting for our leaders within our service unit. I never realized how important these meetings were until I started to attend them. It gives our leaders the opportunity to talk about experiences they’ve had within their troop and time to ask questions and to request help if a problem arises. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

The one thing I hope the girls have learned from me is, it is OK to ask questions.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

It all started with volunteering with Girl Scouts for me. I have learned that I can be a leader for our Girl Scouts. That it is fun to try new things like, indoor skydiving or sleeping at a zoo. I can make a difference within my community by volunteering with not only the Girl Scouts but with many other organizations.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Ayisha Solis

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Ayisha Solis of La Junta in the Pueblo and Southeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Ayisha to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I was a Girl Scout and I really wanted my daughter to experience what I had at her age, but there wasn’t a troop for her age group, so I started one. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I am troop leader for Troop 37153, as well as our troop cookie manager and fall product program manager. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Patience. I have three children of my own and had some degree of patience. Because of the things that our troop has done in our small town and through word of mouth, our troop has more than doubled in a very short time. I am blessed to be able to have so many girls and families, but you definitely have to reinvent yourself, so that you can be the best leader you can be. Patience was an area where I definitely had to step up my game and I’ve been able to carry this with me outside of Girl Scouts. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

You can do or be anything as long as you work hard to get there. This was one of the most important things I learned as a Girl Scout and I think it is super important to learn as a child. Society has this cookie cutter image of how a girl should act, talk, and look. While times are advancing, some things aren’t so out of the ordinary anymore. But, these girls shouldn’t even have to think about what is acceptable for society. They need to be thinking about what they are passionate about, who they want to be, and go out and do it! 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My girls have so many personalities and there is no stopping them. In order to help then to grow, I am constantly looking for new ways, along with my co-leader, to make their experience the best it can be. I have been able to build relationships in the community and feel as if I have a stronger presence and sense of leadership in all roles I play; mom, employee, supervisor, friend, etc. We have definitely grown as a troop and it is exciting that we all get to learn together in different ways. We all bring something to the table and my adult experience in Girl Scouts has been just as rewarding as it was when I was a child, just a little different. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Region 3 Volunteer Appreciation

Submitted by Desiree McBride

Pueblo and Southeastern CO

Pueblo

Region 3 volunteers were celebrated April 17, 2019 with a spa day! Girl Scout volunteers were invited to experience a mini-mediation yoga session lead by Nova Stella Yoga and a mini-massage by Majestic Wellness and Massages. They were also invited to create their own bath bombs and face scrubs, something they were all excited to take back to their troops! The event started with the investiture of 12 new volunteers and ended with lots of relaxed volunteers who were ready for bed! One of the volunteers, Sam King, expressed her thanks in an email sent that night, “Thank you so much for tonight! [We] enjoyed ourselves and totally felt appreciated.”

Region 3 staff wants to thank every single volunteer for the hard work and dedication they have shown this year and every year!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Melissa Deal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Melissa Deal of Aurora in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Melissa to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer originally because my daughter’s troop needed a  troop cookie manager. When the girls were in third grade, their leader decided to step down and I accepted the role of troop leader. The reason why I have continued to be a Girl Scout volunteer is to spend time with my daughter.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I have several volunteer roles within Girl Scouts. I have been a troop leader for five years and currently have 12 wonderful Cadettes. I wear several hats when it comes to Product Program. I am an area cookie manager (two years), service unit cookie manager (seven years, I think), and troop cookie manager (nine years). I also participate in the Fall Product Program as a service unit fall product program manager (five years, I think) and a troop fall product program manager (five years).

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned a ton from my girls. They teach me something new all the time. I have definitely learned to fine tune my organizational skills, as well as my event planning skills. Last year, I planned a trip to South Dakota for a week with all of the girls and their families. I have learned compassion, understanding, and self confidence from being a Girl Scout volunteer.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

Through all of my years being a Girl Scout volunteer, I hope that my girls have learned that anything is possible if you just put your mind to it.  My girls have watched me go through breast cancer treatment and continue to persevere through it all. My hope is that they have learned that nothing can hold you back if you want to succeed. I also hope that they have learned compassion and empathy for everyone. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My experience as a volunteer has helped me become a G.I.R.L. in several different ways. Together as a troop, the girls and I have planned several trips and outings. We have come up with ideas, and ways to make those ideas come to life while the girls worked on their various Silver Award projects. I have definitely taken many risks every cookie season! I have become a successful leader of getting 12 middle school girls to agree and work together as a team.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Megan Block

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Megan Block of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Megan to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?  

I really enjoyed my Girl Scout years ( 7-8 grade and 10 grade) in northern Maine and Belgium and I wanted to provide others girls with cool opportunities.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I began my Girl Scout leadership roles as a resident counselor at Camp Tanasi (Norris Lake in Tennessee) in 1991. I was a commissioned Lieutenant in the Air Force and I was waiting to go on active duty. At my first assignment at Wright-Patterson in Ohio, a fellow Lieutenant and I started a Brownie troop in Fairborn, Ohio and we led together for four years. I met and married my husband and we got stationed in Incirlik AB in Turkey in 1995. I got to lead a Daisy troop for 1.5 years while there. In 1998, we moved to Colorado Springs and we had our first child, Madison. When she entered kindergarten in 2003, I started her Girl Scout troop. After having my fourth child in 2004, my friend led the troop and I took a year off. I returned to leadership for her troop in 2005.  When my second daughter, Mackenzie started kindergarten in 2007, I started her troop as well. During this time, I have also held the nut and cookie mom positions every year, as well as serving as the SU 20 treasurer for two years and the SU 20 manager for six years.  Both of my girls have also earned their Gold Awards. I am also a BS volunteer and I also have an Eagle Scout and future Eagle Scout.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that you need to put the needs of the girls first and Girl Scouts is only as good as you make it. Try not to complain unless you are willing to step up and make things better. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope they have learned to be curious and explore the world around them. I want them to try new things and challenge themselves. The only limits you have are the ones you put on yourself!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

As a leader, I have overcome many fears (dealing with mice and fears of the dark as a camp counselor; taking on a troop with a fellow 22-year-old and doing all sorts of overnights in Ohio; traveling with girls to MN, SD, CO, KS, MO and this summer CA) and planned countless troop and service unit events (Reach for the Peak, SU encampments, skate nights, thinking days, leader/daughter dinners, swim nights, trampoline events, paint parties, pottery days, etc). I have helped plan many badge weekends and “Journey in a weekend”— fully utilizing Girl Scout properties such as the Pueblo Loft, Hamp Hut, Twisted Pine, Sky High, Meadow Mountain Ranch, and Tomahawk. I always try to lead by example… going first off the 20-foot high dive at Norris Lake, taking the first leap of faith in Buena Vista, holding Rosie the Tarantula first at the Butterfly Pavillion, and leading countless flashlight-free night hikes.  While I love the idea of doing an EF Tour, we pride ourselves with doing summer trips that cost between $250 and $450 each summer. By utilizing Girl Scout and church properties and making our own meals, we still have a great time and make awesome memories! 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Carolyn Decker

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Carolyn Decker of Longmont in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Carolyn to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Girl Scouting was a huge part of my life growing up with my mom, my three sisters, and I all all being involved. I had such great experiences as a Girl Scout, camping, backpacking, sailing, traveling, going to a spectacular art camp, being a camp counselor that I wanted to make sure my daughter also had a chance to experience Girl Scouts, so I volunteered to lead a troop when she was old enough.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

While we lived in Arizona, I led a group of girls from when they Brownies through Cadettes. When we moved to Colorado, I became involved in a huge multi-level troop where I helped lead Daisies through Seniors. I am currently leading an Ambassador troop, or should I say I am guiding an Ambassador troop since the young women are the leaders now. I am also a Girl Scout trainer leading different level 101 classes and Cooking and Camping training.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

That Girl Scouting is just as fun as an adult as a girl! I am amazed by the passion and dedication that all the adult volunteers I have met have for making Girl Scouting happen for girls. I have also learned that Girl Scouting is the most fun when girls are making the decisions.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

That they are each in their own unique way powerful people that can make things happen.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I am naturally a solitary “go-getter,” but I have learned through Girl Scouting that working as a team toward a goal is really inspiring. I also have learned that you have incredible experiences when you are a risk-taker. I would never ever have considered learning to scuba dive without my girls and now they want to go on another traveling adventure to explore the world and scuba dive again!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Terri Dayton

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Terri Dayton of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Terri to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

While I was in the Air Force, stationed in Norway, several high school girls needed a leader. Since I grew up as a Girl Scout, I figured why not.  We had a blast together. I continued as a leader in Maryland for my daughter, Erica. Continuing that tradition when we moved to Colorado. It was an instant way to make friends. I have now been a leader for five troops.  Some my girls have been in an one that my daughters were not in. I love witnessing the growth of the girls from Daisies and Brownies, to young adults. It is so much fun teaching and mentoring them.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Wow:  I have had soooo many roles. 

  1. Leader and co-leader of five troops in Colorado and Maryland
  2. SU Camp Director in Maryland
  3. SU Secretary in SU 16
  4. SU Manager/Director SU 16
  5. SU Treasurer SU 16
  6. Gold Award Mentor

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

How to be flexible. There is rarely a time where I have something planned and we stick to it. I have often gone from Plan A all the way to Plan L. To have extra ideas, games, songs, crafts, explanations, and reasons in my back and front pockets. I have learned to listen and watch the girls for cues of what works and what isn’t working. Each girl is special whether she is mine or someone else’s. We all have something special, unique to bring to the table.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

Hopefully, some life skills, flexibility, mentoring and leadership.  Most of all: love for each other. I think all the time we have spent together over the years, that my girls have learned that if something is not working, then we need to move on to something else. I have witnessed girls grow from timid young people to leaders in their career field, watching that one “tomboy” girl in elementary, middle, and high school become a fashion designer, helping girls find their passion, their dream, making a goal, then a plan, watching them live their dream is awesome. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I:  I have learned to be more flexible. Looking for ways to meet all the girls needs not just one or two and to help girls at every level. The girls have taught me to listen, think, discuss ways to improve, and or change an idea.

L:  I am a far better Girl Scout leader by taking this journey with the girls. Instead of leading all the time, I love to mentor them to become leaders, to find the best part of themselves all the time, believe it and live it.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Tressa Jukes

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Tressa Jukes of Mancos in the Southwestern Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Tressa to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer? 

I became a Girl Scout leader, so that I could provide another age group of girls in our community opportunities through my knowledge and experiences. When we relocated to the area, there was only one troop in our small town with no troops for younger girls. I also like to use the opportunity to be a positive role model and show girls that you can be fearless, dedicated, and determined.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I’ve been volunteering with Girl Scouts for six years. I started as a troop parent volunteer while my husband was stationed in Juneau, Alaska and added troop cookie manager to my resume while there. After we moved to Mancos, I became a troop co-leader. I have also been TCM for our troop, as well as our service unit cookie cupboard manager for the Mesa Verde Service Unit, and within the past two years I have acquired the title of co-director of Camp Conundrum with my partner in crime/friend/mentor, Frieda Knezek.  It is the only volunteer-run Girl Scout Camp in our area, providing our girls with a weekend in July full of of mystery solving shenanigans and fun.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned many things over the course of the last six or so years, including improvisation; as nothing really goes as planned. My girls have taught me selflessness, and that no matter how small they are, given the chance, they will move mountains. I have also learned that giving these girls the world and encouraging them in a positive way is the best way to help  them to reach their dreams and goals. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that they take away a lot of things from me, most importantly their conviction to do what is right and to stand up for the people who don’t otherwise have a voice. I hope that they continue to see how important it is to volunteer in their communities, even if it is as simple as doing random acts of kindness and paying things forward. Most important, I hope they have learned that being fearless and determined will help them go far in life and to not back down when they believe strongly in something.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Prior to volunteering, I was happy to sit on the sidelines and follow the crowd, not realizing the impact one person could have. With volunteering, I have learned that if you want something done, the best way to do it is to do it yourself and get the ball moving. Being newer to the area has given me the opportunity to meet and connect with people to enhance my troop’s experiences and pave the way for younger troops to get involved, as well.  Organizing activities with other community organizations has opened many doors for our troop and exposes them to many other positive women, whom they wouldn’t probably have otherwise met.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Mariah Emond

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Mariah Emond of Delta in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Mariah to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer as I wanted my daughter to have the same access to amazing opportunities I had as a girl in Girl Scouts. I enjoy the camaraderie with other mothers raising a Girl Scout. I love to be seen as a part of another girl’s life as a positive supporter- encouraging them to hang out another 15 minutes at the booth sale as I know their goal to earn their incentive is but another buying customer! I am truly a supporter of all prosocial, after school activities that work on skill development for our youth- these kids need it now more than ever. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

This is my first volunteer position as an adult! I enjoyed 11 years of being a Girl Scout and two years at summer camp near Deckers as the Challenge Course Facilitator. So far, I had been able to help at Applefest with the outreach table. I help with our bi-monthly troop meetings. I attended the cookie rally sleepover and made a short presentation on ways to sell more cookies! We created the first summer camp on the Western Slope in Delta County and had tons of fun exploring the history of Fort Uncompaghre and swimming. Most of all, I am a parent of an amazing little go-getter and love to help her sell nuts, magazines, and cookies.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Everything is possible with teamwork and creative thinking! Having Ms. Mary Bucklin as our troop leader and SU, we are especially blessed to have her years of experience that she shares graciously. I watch her be attentive to all the girls, organize the parents, and make up a year of activities with us! I want to grow up and be just like her- giving, gracious, and so passionate about giving girls the opportunities to succeed. I also have learned so much from our co-leader, Kris Love, about the new Girl Scout processes of cookie buying, apps, and ways to keep everything organized in Girl Scouts. I also love to read on the Girl Scouts of Colorado Blog about al the things we can participate in statewide. It’s great information about the connectedness of an organization. The new online trainings are helpful and to the point on a wide variety of things- like outdoor cooking!

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope they see that they can be anyone they dream of, that they can be fierce with their dreams, and kind to the world while they achieve their dream. I want all girls to know that the level playing field of life exists, if we as women dare to recreate the perception of ourselves into authors of out life and the story is our own unique one to tell. I hope that we can grow a kind generation, one that cares for all the resources on the planet!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I take more risks to get to know people. I am a social person, but not always with people I haven’t yet met. I feel more confident talking to people about the wide world of Girl Scouts and have pushed outside my normal comfort zone. It’s been fun getting to work on new projects that don’t require my professional self to show up- I can just be a caring parent/adult and enjoy having fun with our troop. I feel that Girl Scouts made my foundation for leadership skills and I have always love to learn more to be a better leader. I feel confident that we have the tools in Girl Scouts to share with every girl to grow up to be herself and good to the world!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.