Tag Archives: NASA

Power of Cookie: Colorado Springs Girl Scout graduates from Space Camp

Girl Scout Junior Vivienne S. of Colorado Springs recently attended Space Camp at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center, home of Space Camp®, Space Camp® Robotics™, Aviation Challenge®, U.S. Cyber Camp®, and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center’s Official Visitor Center. Her experience was funded entirely by funds earned through the Girl Scout Cookie Program!

The weeklong educational program promotes science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), while training students and with hands-on activities and missions based on teamwork, leadership and problem solving.

This program is specifically designed for trainees who have a passion for space exploration. Vivienne spent the week training with a team that flew a simulated space mission to the International Space Station (ISS), the Moon or Mars. The crew participated in experiments and successfully completed an extra-vehicular activity (EVA), or spacewalk. Vivienne and crew returned to earth in time to graduate with honors.

Now that Vivienne is back home in Colorado Springs, she is looking forward to earning three space science badges, as well as a coding badge. All four are new badges, released by Girl Scouts of the USA in July 2019. Vivienne earned the “Space Science Investigator” and “Designing Robots 1” badges while at Space Camp.

Space Camp operates year-round in Huntsville, Alabama, and uses astronaut training techniques to engage trainees in real-world applications of STEM subjects. Students sleep in quarters designed to resemble the ISS and train in simulators like those used by NASA.

More than 900,000 trainees have graduated from a Space Camp® program since its inception in Huntsville, Alabama, in 1982, including European Space Agency astronaut, Samantha Cristoforetti and NASA astronauts Dottie Metcalf-Lindenburger, Dr. Kate Rubins, Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Christina Koch, who is serving onboard the International Space Station. Children and teachers from all 50 states and almost 150 international locations have attended a Space Camp® program.

Interested in training like an astronaut?  Visit www.spacecamp.com or call 1-800-637-7223.

About U.S. Space & Rocket Center

The U.S. Space & Rocket Center, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is home to Space Camp® and Aviation Challenge®, the Apollo 16 capsule, the National Historic Landmark Saturn V rocket and world-class traveling exhibits. USSRC is the Official Visitor Center for NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and a showcase for national defense technologies developed at the U.S. Army’s Redstone Arsenal.

To learn more about the exciting programs and activities at the USSRC, go to www.rocketcenter.com.

Change the world with 42 NEW Girl Scout badges

Choose your next adventure and earn one of 42 NEW badges! New programming released by Girl Scouts of the USA on July 16, 2019 enhances existing girl-led activities and offers girls everything from high adventure in the outdoors to learning how to use code to solve problems. Among the 42 new offerings are Outdoor High Adventure badges which feature, for the first time in Girl Scouts’ history, two distinct activity options, letting girls choose how they want to earn each badge.

In addition to existing badge offerings, girls in grades 6–12 can now pursue:

  • Nine Cybersecurity badges, through which girls learn about the inner workings of computer technology and cybersecurity and apply concepts of safety and protection to the technology they use every day. Activities range from decrypting and encrypting messages, to learning proper protection methods for devices, to exploring real-world hacking scenarios (funded by Palo Alto Networks).
  • Three Space Science badges, through which girls explore topics such as the universe and their place in it, properties of light, and inspiring careers in space science (funded by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate and led by the SETI Institute).
  • Think Like a Citizen Scientist, a Girl Scout Leadership Journey during which girls participate in interactive activities to practice observation techniques; collect data; and share their findings with real-world scientists through an online network. As with all of Girl Scouts’ Leadership Journeys, girls use their newly honed skills to take action on a community issue of their choosing (funded by Johnson & Johnson and The Coca-Cola Foundation).
  • To prepare girls in grades 6–12 to pursue computer science careers, Girl Scouts will launch the organization’s first Cyber Challenge on October 19 at sites nationwide, including Arapahoe Community College in Littleton. This program aims to prepare girls to pursue computer science careers in fields such as cybersecurity, artificial intelligence, robotics, and data science. Girls will test their cybersecurity skills, team up with other girls, and meet with cybersecurity professionals!

The new programming for girls in grades K–12 includes:

  • 12 Outdoor High Adventure badges, designed for girls to explore nature and experience exciting outdoor adventures like backpacking, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, rock climbing, and tree climbing—giving them the confidence to support one another, take healthy risks, and spend dedicated time in nature. These are the first Girl Scout badges that members can earn by choosing one of two self-directed paths (funded by The North Face).
  • 18 Coding for Good badges, which not only teach girls the basics of coding but also detail how every stage of the coding process provides girls with opportunities to use their skills for good. Girls will learn about algorithms through age-appropriate, creative activities, such as coding positive memes to spread a message about a cause they care about, designing a digital game to educate people about an issue, and developing an app to promote healthy habits. Every Coding for Good badge includes a plugged-in and unplugged version, so that all girls can learn the foundations of coding, regardless of their access to technology (funded by AT&T and Dell Technologies).

“Girl Scouts has ignited the power and potential of girls for over a century, and we are committed to ensuring that today’s girls are the future of American leadership,” said GSUSA CEO Sylvia Acevedo. “Girl Scouts is where girls can explore new subjects, discover their passions, learn to take smart risks, and become their best, most confident selves—whether they want to become a NASA astronaut, an entrepreneur, a mountain climber, a coder, or a cybersecurity agent.”

GSUSA works with top organizations in fields that interest today’s girls. Combined with Girl Scouts’ expertise in girl leadership, these organizations and specialists advise and weigh in on content to provide the most cutting-edge programming available to girls. Content collaborators include codeSpark, the National Integrated Cyber Education Research Center (NICERC), SciStarter, and Vidcode. In true girl-led fashion, girls also tested the new offerings.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. With Girl Scouts, she’ll discover who she is, what she’s passionate about, and what she wants to achieve—both today and in the future. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

GSCO Photo Challenge: Girl Scout Cookies fuel trip to NASA

Submitted by Frieda Knezek

Southwestern CO

Mancos

“What did you do this weekend?”

“Oh, you know. We went to space and touched the moon. We stirred up dirt on Mars. We strolled through the space shuttle and ate lunch with astronaut Mark “Roman” Polansky, who told us what space smells like (hot metal, in case you’re wondering). We made it snow, built a rocket, and, best of all, made some new friends. (Hi, Frisco Cadettes!)”

A few years ago, after a particularly fun overnight trip to the aquarium and zoo in Denver, our troop decided they were ready for something a little bigger. So, we did some research and narrowed it down to a visit to Disney or NASA. The girls chose NASA, so that they could eat lunch with a real astronaut.

Together, we made a plan, a plan to be go-getters. We figured out how much it would cost, and how we’d earn that money. Then, the girls rolled up their sleeves and got busy. They sold cookies, so many cookies, but also wanted to do something more so they could go on their trip sooner. Innovators that they are, they hosted a Fall Color Run and created a mystery troop camp for Girl Scouts all over Colorado and even from Texas!

Right about now, I’d really like to say how grateful I am for the moms in our troop. They are a powerful force all their own, and they lead this troop every bit as much as I do. I call them the magic. They have helped build an atmosphere, community, and energy in our troop that I didn’t know were possible, and it’s because of them that I feel confident in encouraging the girls to dream as big as they want.

Back to the girls. It took them two years, but they did it. They were risk-takers and hard workers, and they made it happen. They paid for their trip…every cent. Friday, March 1, 2019, they boarded a plane to Houston, Texas, and the adventure began. They spent the day at the Johnson Space Center where they saw Mission Control, the astronaut training facility, the Orion capsule mock-up, rode a simulator into a nebula, and so much more.

That night, they got to stay past closing hours for the Girl Scout Camp In, where they built and launched rockets, solved a mystery box, and slept under an astronaut out on a space walk! (Ok, that was an exhibit, but it was still breathtaking and inspiring and magnificent.) They ate space ice cream, hit the gift shop, and walked away with stars in their eyes. We topped off the trip with a “one-a-cure,” their choice of pedicure or manicure, and a movie.

Everywhere we went, we met Girl Scouts of all ages and people who were thrilled to share in the girls’ adventure. We’re so proud to be a part of this magnificent organization that really throws the doors wide-open for girls and encourages them to dream big, work hard, and realize their visions. Thank you, Girl Scouts. Thank you for the G.I.R.L. Agenda, where they’re taught to be go-getters, innovators, risk-takers, and leaders. Here’s to the adventure, to the journey, and to a brighter future because of our girls…

Girl Scouts of Colorado is hosting a photo challenge! Just submit your favorite Girl Scout photo and the story behind it using the Share Your Stories form (www.gscoblog.org/share). Winners will be featured in future GSCO marketing materials, on GSCO’s social media networks, and on the GSCO Blog.

Girl Scout leadership training at Goddard Space Flight Center

From Girl Scouts of the USA

Senior Girl Scouts and volunteers have the opportunity to take part in a weeklong intensive space science workshop June 18–23, 2017 at NASA’s premier research facility, Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Teams from ten councils, made up of two Girl Scout Seniors, one volunteer, and one amateur astronomer each, will enjoy presentations by NASA scientists, tours of the Goddard facility, access to remote robotic observatories, fun and engaging space science activities, and a “star party” hosted by the Goddard Astronomy Club. Teams will also receive NASA science education materials and guidelines for starting their very own Girl Scout Astronomy Club.

If interested, use the following link to apply by March 17: https://girlscoutsusa.ca1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0GOBSXjhowc1aBL

Local Girl Scout receives honor from NASA

Brittany Kowalski, a senior at Vista Ridge High School and a Girl
Scout since 2002, competed and earned a spot (only 40 girls nationwide received this honor) to go to Houston, Texas, to participate in a NASA program.

Congratulations to Brittany!

Read more about her in this Colorado Springs Gazette article. http://www.gazette.com/articles/kowalski-122368-spot-miss.html

She is in Girl Scout Troop 23 in Colorado Springs and is in Service Unit 13.