Tag Archives: music

Gold Award Girl Scout: Grace Matsey, Highlands Ranch, “Got Music?”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a music tutoring program for elementary and middle school musicians run by members of my high school’s Music Honor Society to help emphasize and educate about the importance of music and music education.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I compared the enrollment numbers from the orchestra classes in 2017-18 school year and the 2018-19 school year.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable because it is run by the members of my high school’s Music National Honor Society. The president of next year will be in charge, and so on and so forth. It will continue to help increase the participation in music programs, as well as helping to educate the importance of music and music education.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I communicated with the Program Coordinator for the head of the National Music Honor Society, and they were able to obtain information about my project to post it on their websites and have workshops on how to effectively teach music. This enables it to now be a national music tutoring program.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I can communicate with large groups of people. I spoke in front of an audience of 300 people, and it was really inspiring to see how you can connect with so many people at once, and how you know that they can all feel your passion for a project.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award will help me step forward with confidence in the future. I know that I can do anything, if I set a plan and work towards it.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think that if I had not completed the Gold Award, Girl Scouts would not have been such an important part of my life. This project helped me spread the awareness of something that I am passionate about, while working with amazing people and creating connections.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

It helped me become a go-getter because I set a very aggressive timeline, while also working with lots of people. I completed the majority of my project in one semester, and was still able to see results.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Madeline Farr, Centennial, “Music Creates Community”

What did you do for your Gold Award Project?

For my Gold Award Project, I installed a piece of outdoor musical equipment called a “metallophone” on the playground at East Elementary and provided the school with lesson plans on how to use the new instrument. I educated my community about the importance of alternate recess activities for anxious young people by hosting a benefit concert at which student soloists played and I spoke about my project and the importance of music for youth.

How did you measure the impact of your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of this project by interviewing teachers at the school who informed me that this instrument has already had the desired effect on students’ playtime behavior. “Students are never aggressive with this instrument. They love to share it with their peers,” one teacher said. I also had an opportunity to see students play on the playground, where I watched them interact joyfully with the metallophone without any conflict among each other.

How was your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I specifically chose a manufacturer that designed instruments made to withstand the elements and last outside for decades, so that East Elementary doesn’t have to worry about physical maintenance in the future. They have committed to maintaining the instrument for its lifetime where it will be used as playground equipment and in music classes. I also designed a website, musiccreatescommunity.org, which I have continued to promote online with the hope it will inspire other communities to install similar equipment. My website recently received so many visitors I had to increase its bandwidth! The school will also continue to use my lesson plans to promote the use of the instrument.

 What did you learn about yourself?

I targeted my project towards young students coping with social anxiety disorders that are taking drugs like Qualia, I looked for information in this Review of Qualia. As an elementary schooler, this instrument would have helped me make friends on the playground, and I hoped to provide the same thing for others. By choosing a project so close to home, I was forced to put my struggle with mental illness on display to people whom I didn’t even know, which was scary at first. This experience helped me learn that by opening up about my own struggles, I can help others who may be struggling with the same thing.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This project made me more aware of the needs of my community, and I’d like to continue serving and educating my community in any way I can looking into the future. I’ve even started conversations with my band director about organizing a 5k run fundraiser/awareness campaign for my band program to educate people about music education and its positive benefits. During this project, I learned to love being involved my community, which is something I will take with me throughout the rest of my life.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

When I joined Girl Scouts in 3rd grade, I knew that I wanted to do it all the way through my Gold Award and beyond. The girls in my troop are some of my best friends, and even though we come from very different social circles and have very different skill sets, we’re connected by Girl Scouts. One of the major components of my Gold Award project was connecting people, and I think since I’ve been working on it, I’ve strengthened connections with my fellow Girl Scouts. I’m happy to be part of a troop full of love and support, and I think this project has made me appreciate that even more.

 How did earning your Gold Award help you become G.I.R.L.?

I would say that this project helped me become an innovator. In my project, I provided an alternative recess activity for elementary schoolers struggling with anxiety disorders. This metallophone helps students form meaningful friendships and find community on the playground. Alternate play is something that is not widely researched or acknowledged, and I hope my Gold Award will serve as a model for schools across the United States.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Colorado Gold Award recipient named Girl Scout Great

Girl Scouts of the USA recently named 2010 Colorado Gold Award recipient Erica Vlahinos from Castle Rock a Girl Scout Great. Girl Scout Great recipients are featured in a national 100th anniversary public service announcement campaign for Girl Scouts of the USA. (View the ad here: Erica_20120815)

Currently Erica is a Junior studying Musical Theatre at the University of Cincinnati – College Conservatory of Music. Any time she hasn’t been in school, she’s been working professionally as an actress. After she graduates from college in two years she plans to move to New York, which is really excited about!

According to Erica, “Girl Scouts, and receiving my Gold Award, showed me the possibilities that come with sheer determination. There are so few immovable limitations on what a woman can achieve if she is willing to work for it. Whatever your goal, mine clearly being to be a successful stage actress, you CAN and WILL achieve it. My journey in Girl Scouts and my Gold Award all seemed daunting and impossible at one point. But if you decide that you are going to do something, achieve something, and that you are going to fight until you do, it will happen. This lesson has served me well. And I’m sure it will continue to expand my future. (And hopefully the futures of those whose lives I cross.) The more I’m growing and meeting so many new people I’m realizing we’ve all figured out things that feel like the big secret or missing link to happiness or success. The more we share our ‘secrets’ selflessly, the more we can all move together towards a bright future.”

Having struggled with Dyslexia herself, for her Gold Award, Erica created a Dyslexic Learning Tools Library in her community. She provided the Phillip S. Miller Library in Castle Rock 36 audio and visual books, all recorded by people passionate about or affected by learning disabilities themselves. Her number one message to those using the resources was “You may have Dyslexia but Dyslexia does not have you.”

Songbirds Girl Scout Choir

Do you like to sing?  Do you remember singing around the campfire at camp?  Would you like to learn new songs as well as “oldies, but goodies” in the Girl Scout traditions? The Songbirds Girl Scout choir will be the place to gather for songs, games and generally having a great time.

Would you like to learn how to play the guitar? If you are at least 10 years old and own a guitar, you can come to a free class once a month and learn to play chord progressions to accompany Girl Scouts in their singing efforts.

Would you like to help perform in events around the state to celebrate our 100th anniversary year, as well as possibly singing at fundraising events, maybe even on the radio or TV and other “gigs” as we have requests?

The Songbirds Girl Scout choir meets the 3rd Saturday of every month, September through April each year. Guitar class runs from 9 – 10 a.m., and the sing-along choir practice is from 10 a.m. – noon.  We usually take a short break about 11 a.m. There is NO registration, no cost, and the group is open to all ages, including dads, brothers, neighbors and friends. Whole troops can come. You will be provided with a song book, and a clapping games book as well as a guitar book for guitar students.

For performances we will wear a royal-blue logo polo shirt, which will be provided, and either black or khaki bottoms. No special shoes are required.

The more the merrier ! The more folks we have the better we will sing, and the better we sing, the more we can learn. To sign up please contact director Penny Roberts at 970-577-2027 or e-mail Penny at proberts@larimer.org.