Tag Archives: mountain communities

Big city fun for mountain town Cadettes

Submitted by Annie Sachs

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Steamboat Springs Cadette Troop 54538 recently celebrated earning their Bronze Award (as fifth-graders) with a Denver weekend of theater and fine dining! The girls loved the touring Broadway musical “School of Rock,” especially with all the children in the cast. They also enjoyed a behind-the-scenes tour of DCPA and capped off the weekend with the famed Brown Palace brunch. Thanks so much to the Lufkin Family for helping fund all the fun!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Troop Trek campout at Fetcher Ranch

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Troop Trek 2018 included 48 Girl Scouts from many Colorado troops and a herd of cows at the Fetcher Ranch near Steamboat Lake! We camped, cooked, and earned a few badges along the way! With perfect weather, we tried new ways of cooking, made survival shelters, hiked with friends, and celebrated a weekend of camping the Girl Scout way!

Girls from Junior, Cadette, and Senior/Ambassador troops in four different regions gathered to camp together, make new Girl Scout friends, and learn new skills. From building survival shelters to Dutch oven cooking, to lashing and outdoor skills, troops of girls also learned a bit about ranching and how beef cows fit into the food chain.

Innovators and Risk-Takers, all of the girls were part of a Pick 4 Dessert Competition where they picked from various ingredients and had one hour to create a delicious dish to be judged and shared. From Dirt Cake to Blueberry Cobbler to ooey-gooey s’mores, all of the dishes were a big hit!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scout awarded the Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund

Girl Scout Cadette Olivia Margaux Ferzacca of Eagle County in the Mountain Communities region is headed to Girl Scouts of Colorado summer camp after receiving the Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund. Olivia will attend “Girl vs. Zombie” Tomahawk Ranch in June.  She wrote in her application for this award, “Mary Jo Jacobs is a ‘real go-getter,’ by working to achieve her goals, leading by example, helping others, and contributing to society. Not only do I want to led by example and help others, but I always felt that contributing to society was a big deal..”

Mary Jo’s four children established the scholarship in December 2014 to honor their mother’s extraordinary legacy. As an 8-year-old girl growing up in 1937, Mary Jo wanted a new pair of roller skates. She wanted them more than anything in world— until she learned her Brownie troop was going to be able to go to summer camp. Mary Jo had to make a choice: spend the $8 she had worked so hard to earn on roller skates or Girl Scout camp? For Mary Jo, the decision was simple. She was going to Girl Scout camp. Mary Jo’s mother walked her to the local Girl Scout office, so she could be the first to register. A reporter for the Artesia Daily Press in New Mexico even wrote a story about Mary Jo and her decision.

After returning home from camp, Mary Jo continued to participate in Girl Scout activities, including going to camp. Eventually, she became a doctor and worked tirelessly to serve the people of Eagle and Garfield Counties, Colorado.

The Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund provides Girl Scouts from Eagle and Garfield counties in Colorado with a scholarship so they can experience the learning opportunities, joy, and camaraderie of attending Girl Scout Camp. “Our hope is that that many girls will have the same positive experience, education and adventure that mom had through her involvement in Girl Scouting and her opportunity to attend Girl Scout camp,” said Dr. Patricia VanDevander, daughter of Dr. Mary Jo Jacobs.

Registration for Girl Scout Camp is now underway on the Girl Scouts of Colorado website at girlscoutsofcolorado.org. For summer 2017, girls can attend overnight camp sessions at Sky High Ranch near Manitou Lake and Woodland Park or perennial favorite Tomahawk Ranch near Bailey, southwest of Denver. Activities include archery, backpacking, photography, and rock climbing. Overnight camp runs from 3 to 12 days for girls ages 6 and up.  Girl Scouts of Colorado will continue to offer day camping adventures throughout the state. The summer camp schedule is live on the Girl Scouts of Colorado website (girlscoutsofcolorado.org). Girl Scout summer camp programs are open to all girls throughout Colorado, whether they’re in a troop or not, and new campers get a 10-percent discount.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Silverthorne

Nearly 100 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Silverthorne Pavilion in Silverthorne on May 11, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 25 in the Mountain Communities region earned the Bronze Award. 10 girls in the region earned the prestigious Silver Award and three became Gold Award Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Frisco Girl Scouts earn “Robotics” badges

Submitted by Cricket Hawkins

Mountain Communities

Frisco

Troop 52843 recently completed the “Designing, Programming, and Showcasing Robotics” badges at the Brownie and Junior levels. The girls learned about biomimicry while building a simple robotic arm and then designed a robot that can assist others or animals. The girls presented to their parents and each other during their April meeting. Way to go girls!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

OGAB expanded my Girl Scout experience

Submitted by Bailey Stokes

Mountain Communities

Buena Vista

I have been a Girl Scout since I was in the first grade. During the past 12 years, I have been heavily involved in Girl Scouts. I have completed multiple service projects including my Bronze and Silver Awards, and I am currently working on my Gold Award. I have also been going to camp since I was in the second grade, and most recently, I volunteered as a counselor in training. However, the Older Girl Advisory Board has been one of the most formative and impactful volunteer experiences I have had.

I decided to join the Older Girl Advisory Board because I was interested in expanding my Girl Scout experience. I was also looking for a way to make a difference in my Girl Scout community. In addition, I applied during the beginning of my junior year, and during that time I was looking for a way to find something that I could put on my scholarship applications that would set me apart from other applicants. Being a member of the Older Girl Advisory Board showed scholarship committees that I am dedicated to serving my community, and that I am a strong leader. I sincerely believe that it helped me be selected for the scholarships that I have earned.

Being a member of the Older Girl Advisory Board has enhanced my confidence in myself. It taught me how to confidently express my ideas. Due to the Older Girl Advisory Board, I also gained confidence in my ability to communicate with other people. It also taught me how to be assertive. Furthermore, the Older Girl Advisory Board allowed me to expand my Girl Scout experience outside of my own community and it gave me the opportunity to meet new friends. I enjoyed the opportunity to engage with other older Girl Scouts from all across the state.

Through the Older Girl Advisory Board, I was able to help make real life changes in the world and our Girl Scout community. For example, I was able to give my feedback about the cookie and Highest Awards programs. I also helped bring programs that focus on confidence building, and body image to new areas in Colorado. Through the Older Girl Advisory Board, I have also had the opportunity to inspire younger Girl Scouts. The highlight of my time on the Older Girl Advisory Board took place at one of our retreats.

We had just finished talking to the makers of Girl Scout Cookies about how we make a difference in the world, and when we walked inside the lodge at camp, we were all in our full Girl Scout uniforms. There was a group of younger Girl Scouts there, and I will never forget the look of amazement on their faces upon seeing all of us in our uniforms. I sincerely believed that I had inspired them. That moment was when I truly realized the difference that I am making on the world as an older Girl Scout.

Being a member of the Older Girl Advisory Board was an amazing experience that changed my life. I would highly encourage anyone to apply to be a member. It gives you the opportunity to make a difference, add to your resume, build confidence, expand your Girl Scout experience, and make new friends.

The Older Girl Advisory Board (OGAB) is a group of Girl Scout Seniors and Ambassadors from all regions of Colorado that provides feedback on projects that enrich the experience of Girl Scouts in Colorado.  Make your voice heard by applying today! Applications close on September 18, 2018. https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/ogab2018

Girl Scout awarded the Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund

 

Girl Scout Daisy (soon-to-be Brownie) Rebecca W. of Garfield County in the Mountain Communities region is headed to Girl Scouts of Colorado summer camp after receiving the Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund. Rebecca will attend “Mermaids” Tomahawk Ranch in June.  She wrote in her application for this award, “What does Girl Scouts mean to me? It means that we can do lots of fun things, like selling cookies and talking to people. Also, we do lots to help our community. This year, we went to the animal shelter and donated food and blankets. We also bought four families Thanksgiving dinner, who couldn’t afford to buy the food themselves. Right before winter break, our whole troop made dinner for our families. There was over 60 people there! Before school started we went camping as a troop too! My favorite thing about Girl Scouts is spending time with my friends. We have a big troop, and I belong to the Daisies. We have five Daises, and it’s really fun to get to know them.”

Mary Jo’s four children established the scholarship in December 2014 to honor their mother’s extraordinary legacy. As an 8-year-old girl growing up in 1937, Mary Jo wanted a new pair of roller skates. She wanted them more than anything in world— until she learned her Brownie troop was going to be able to go to summer camp. Mary Jo had to make a choice: spend the $8 she had worked so hard to earn on roller skates or Girl Scout camp? For Mary Jo, the decision was simple. She was going to Girl Scout camp. Mary Jo’s mother walked her to the local Girl Scout office, so she could be the first to register. A reporter for the Artesia Daily Press in New Mexico even wrote a story about Mary Jo and her decision.

After returning home from camp, Mary Jo continued to participate in Girl Scout activities, including going to camp. Eventually, she became a doctor and worked tirelessly to serve the people of Eagle and Garfield Counties, Colorado.

The Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund provides Girl Scouts from Eagle and Garfield counties in Colorado with a scholarship so they can experience the learning opportunities, joy, and camaraderie of attending Girl Scout Camp. “Our hope is that that many girls will have the same positive experience, education and adventure that mom had through her involvement in Girl Scouting and her opportunity to attend Girl Scout camp,” said Dr. Patricia VanDevander, daughter of Dr. Mary Jo Jacobs.

Registration for Girl Scout Camp is now underway on the Girl Scouts of Colorado website at girlscoutsofcolorado.org. For summer 2017, girls can attend overnight camp sessions at Sky High Ranch near Manitou Lake and Woodland Park or perennial favorite Tomahawk Ranch near Bailey, southwest of Denver. Activities include archery, backpacking, photography, and rock climbing. Overnight camp runs from 3 to 12 days for girls ages 6 and up.  Girl Scouts of Colorado will continue to offer day camping adventures throughout the state. The summer camp schedule is live on the Girl Scouts of Colorado website (girlscoutsofcolorado.org). Girl Scout summer camp programs are open to all girls throughout Colorado, whether they’re in a troop or not, and new campers get a 10-percent discount.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Leaders really make a difference

Submitted by Chris Kucera

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

When you are feeling overworked and under-appreciated while putting your all into running your troop, remember that you are impacting girls for their whole lives. Today, I got one of the best kinds of thank you’s…

When I was in college and freshly married, I started a Girl Scout Junior troop in California. I was blessed with a wonderful group of girls long before I ever had a daughter of my own. A few months ago and again today, two of these beloved young women searched me out and friended me on Facebook. I just want to reach out and hug both of them. Over 20 years later, those girls remember me and want to reconnect with me.

When you need a Girl Scout pick-me-up, just think about the long term impact you are having. It certainly lifted my spirits and makes me want to go that extra mile!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Geneva Ascher, Breckenridge, “Testicular and Breast Cancer Self Exams”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

For my Gold Award project, I instructed the freshman,  along with some sophomores, juniors, and seniors at my high school, how to perform self exams for testicular cancer and breast cancer. My project included a Google slide presentation and fake testicles and breasts, with mock cancerous lumps so that students could understand what they are looking for when performing self exams.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Before my presentation, I conducted a survey though Google forms asking students what they would do of they every encounter an abnormality with their body. The way I asked the question lead to the biased answer of contacting a doctor, but even with my biased conclusion, students were still unsure. After my presentation, there was a very similar questionnaire on their Health Unit test, and many of the students said they would contact their doctor after finding anything different about their body.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

After the completion of my project, the health teacher and the health science teacher at my school pledged to make it a formal part of her annual curriculum at Summit High School. Beyond this, I have made a video that will be played on Tiger TV through Summit County TV10.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Beyond just having this presented in health classes at Summit High School, my friends and I edited a video giving a quick presentation on my project ,in Video Production 2 and it will be play on Summit County TV 10 through their broadcast journalism segments produced by the students in the Video programs at Summit High School. This reaches a global connection because Summit County is a very destination/recreation vacation spot and people from all over the world can watch SCTV10 as they stay in hotels in Summit County. This video will also be uploaded to YouTube.

What did you learn about yourself?

This project was very outside of my comfort zone. I have always been very afraid of public speaking, but this project gave me the leadership skills of taking action in situations I would have normally never put my self into. Through the Gold Award project and the majority of my Girl Scout experiences have led me to be the person I am today. I am now less held back, more outgoing, and I now have the will to complete any task that is brought my way. My determination through this project has also given me the chance to be the vice president of the Certified Nurses Assistant Club, Summit Health Leaders at my school. This has also given me a chance to grow my leadership skills. The Gold Award has brought me to a mentality that I can accomplish all that I work for.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Getting my Gold Award has proven to me that I can finish anything I put my mind to. Whether it is schoolwork or making a difference to the community around me, I now know that I can change anything that I feel needs to be changed. Dedication is one of my strongest attributes now. This can help me in the future because I am not sure what life holds for me, but I am confident I will find success.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The most important part of my Gold Award was the awareness that I have created for two very curable cancers. My view on these cancers are that if sex and mental health are so widely talked about in schools, cancers, too, need to be talked about.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

G- This project had the intention of getting me through the stress of something that will only benefit the community and eventually the world around me. This is important to me because I have never been the greatest about completing tasks that may seem a little difficult. But because I enjoyed the topic and the atmosphere I created with my Gold Award, I was determined to complete it. This will serve me in the rest of my life because I now have the mind set that even if I do not enjoy what I am working on, the feeling of completing a given task is so rewarding it is always worth it.

I- Though out my project, I created new ideas and brought my self into new positions that I would never have put my self in. My Gold Award has created a new, interesting presentation shown through out my school, but it has brought out the best in me. I am now comfortable with my self and am comfortable with unfamiliar situations.

R- The Gold Award says nothing more than risk-taker to me. To complete this project, you need to put your self out into new positions, find new interests, and make a difference. No difference would be made in the world if people never tried anything new.

L- My high school life has been filled with different leadership positions, but the Gold Award has brought it to new heights. I am now able to finish all that is brought my way, with confidence that I have done my best.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Nicole Choma, Breckenridge, “Elementary School Rugby Program”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I created an elementary school rugby program, and I was able to teach elementary school age children rugby, with my coaching skills.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

To measure the impact of my Gold Award, I hope to see more participation in the middle and high school teams for both boys and girls rugby. To be able to see impact, I had the children raise their hands in the beginning and end of the program and I asked them who was interested in playing rugby in the future. I saw more and more hands being raised at the end of the program, which meant that more children wanted to join at the end of my program.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustained by training younger teammates to take over this camp for the years to come. I will be involved until graduation. My hope for the younger ruggers is to build upon their leadership skills and perform to their highest expectations once I leave the program. My rugby coach and the Summit Rugby Team board will also be involved with continuing the program.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The global link to my project is that rugby is played worldwide. It is mainly thriving in countries such as Australia, New Zealand, England, Ireland, and South Africa. This sport was also reintroduced into the 2016 Rio Summer Olympics and will be continued onto the 2020 summer Olympics. So will the increasing popularity of the sport, it would be important to have knowledge upon the sport. I also talked about this global link with the kids at the program. Many of them did not know that rugby was an Olympic sport and how much is was played around the world. Globally, rugby is ranked at #6, with the second most watched and attended competition that is just behind the FIFA world cup. According to ranker.com in the U.S rugby is ranked as #19 comparing this to the worldwide favorite sport of soccer that is ranked at #5.

What did you learn about yourself?

With this project I learned more of what my weaknesses were. Some of those weaknesses included organization and communication. I learned that those were the areas that I needed to improve upon, which takes me how I improved through this project. I learned that in order to have everything work out you need to have everything planned, to be able to communicate to others, on what I want to accomplish.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

It will be a good source that I can reflect upon, and know that if I set my mind to something I can achieve it. I will also have the sense that I did something good for my community before I left for college, and it has inspired me to do more great things for the people around me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it was a good way to conclude my Girl Scout experience and really put all of the skills that I have learned as a Girl Scout into my Gold Award, but also lead me to be a lifetime Girl Scout.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award has taught me things that I didn’t realize that I was empowered with. The most that empowered me and caused my project to be successful was for me to be a risk-taker. Doing this project, I had to take a risk, that risk was to teach a whole new group of people that didn’t really know the sport of rugby. It was not a easy task. I had to innovate and bring a whole new idea of a sport to a group of people. Striving for my Gold Award helped with that significantly.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org