Tag Archives: mountain communities

Gold Award Project: Entrepreneural development in Haiti Part Three

Submitted by Lilli T.

Mountain Communities

Breckenridge

Since last writing in regards to the progress on my Gold Award project, I have been in contact with several organizations in an effort to increase the sustainability of my Gold Award. My Gold Award focused on business education in Haiti and was a three-day business workshop for an 8th grade class on the western coast of Haiti. During the workshop the 15 students learned the five fundamental aspects of business through the design and production of a “little business.” The fundamentals that were focused on include: a business plan, loan, product design, advertising, and profit. After conducting this workshop in late May of this year, I have been in contact with 10 people who are connected with Haitian schools in hopes of extending the impact of my curriculum to multiple Haitian schools. I hope to either train people currently in Haiti or return to Haiti in the future to continue the use and development of the “Ti Biznis” program.

Gold Award Training in Rifle

Attention all 8th grade Cadettes, Seniors, Ambassadors, troop leaders, and parents on the Western Slope and Mountain Communities! If you (or your girl) is thinking about going for her Gold Award, don’t miss out on training in Rifle on Wednesday, August 2, 2017 from 6 – 9 p.m. at the Rifle Public Library.

This is a free training. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the highest achievement in Girl Scouts. In this training, girls will learn the requirements, council procedures, and tips for making her Gold Award experience successful and rewarding.

Gold Award training is mandatory for any girl interested in pursuing her Gold Award. Troop leaders, co-leaders, and parents are encouraged to attend. If interested in attending please email highestawards@gscolorado.org by Monday, July 31.

Gold Award project: Entrepreneural Development in Haiti Part Two

Submitted by Lilli T.

Mountain Communities

Breckenridge

Through Girl Scouts, girls learn a plethora of skills including the encouragement to reach higher. My name is Lilli and I am no exception to the adoption of these skills as through Girl Scouts I was able to accomplish an honor I never sought possible.

Last year, I connected with the Haitian school of St. Paul’s and in doing so I began to learn about the education climate in Haiti. Haitian education rates are among the lowest in the western hemisphere with a literacy rate of 61% compared to America’s 86%. 88% of eligible Haitian students are enrolled in primary school while 20% are enrolled in secondary school. The Haitian government provides very little funds for public schools, with only 10% of the government’s budget spent on public schools. 21.5% of the population, age 5+, receive a secondary education, and 1% receive a university level education. 33% of children (ages 6-12) do not attend school. In acknowledgment of these statistics, and with an interest in business, I wanted to provide an extension to the 8th grade curriculum at the Haitian School of St. Paul’s by incorporating a business component into their education.

This past month, I partnered with the Colorado Haiti Project and from May 29-31, 2017 I conducted a three day business workshop for the 8th grade class of St. Paul’s Episcopal School in Petit Trou de Nippes, Haiti. During the workshop the ten students learned the five fundamentals of business: how to create a business plan, what loans are, how to design a product, how to advertise it, and ultimately how to earn a profit. Through the workshop, the students learned about the concept of supply and demand, economic competition, etc. There were five product options in which the students were able to choose from; dominos, checkers, sak through, friendship bracelets, and a home garden bed. Students were able to work in groups of two, or individually. In an effort to manage the competition, no more than three groups, or people, were able to make a product. The students began by choosing a product and proceeding to fill out a business plan and create advertisements. The following day the students took out loans from the “Monopoly Bank” and then proceed to the wholesale store in which they purchased the necessary materials to make their product(s). For the duration of the second day, students sewed, painted, colored, and braided their products. On the final day, the students finished their products and a moc-market was held in which the administration of St. Pau’ls and I purchased the students product with Monopoly money. Following the market, the students payed back half of their loan and then were able to purchase the leftover materials from the wholesale store.

The aspect of the business workshop that was most humbling was the following day when St. Paul’s hosted a community wide agricultural festival. At the festival, the students that participated in my workshop sold friendship bracelets and other products that they had made the previous night from the material they were able to purchase with the profit they had made. Through the information and encouragement provided during the business workshop students were able to make a real profit. My primary goal in working to earn my Gold Award is to provide these 8th graders, whom some will not continue school after this year, with an enriched education that will help them in the workforce. Witnessing these 8th graders using the fundamentals that we focused on in class and putting them to use so quickly and successfully was a true accomplishment.

Another aspect I hope to cover in earning my Gold Award is to educate those in the United States and elsewhere about the education climate in Haiti and encourage them to get involved!

Cookie connoisseurs at Aspen St. Regis

Submitted by Cindi Graves

Western Colorado

Grand Junction

The Aspen St. Regis hotel was host to girls from Troop 13723 of Aspen and Troop 10065 of Grand Junction who acted as judges for a Girl Scout cookie dessert making contest. The St. Regis launched their inaugural Camp Astor, inspired by founder John Jacob Astor IV and his love for Lake St. Regis in upstate New York, as a summer offering packed with outdoor adventures. This event provided a sampling of the camp to a select party of journalists. Part of the fun was competing for the coveted “golden whisk” by creating the most mouthwatering dessert using Girl Scout Cookies as an ingredient. The girls, as a panel of cookie connoisseurs, examined, tasted, and deliberated as a group to determine the winner based on presentation, taste, and use of the cookie. The girls and their families were treated to a fabulous outdoor feast, tutorial on sabering champagne, and a sing-a-long by the pool, all with the beautiful backdrop of Aspen. Director of Marketing Jessica Young was a Girl Scout as a girl and when envisioning a camp event, thought it would be incomplete without Girl Scouts. We had a great time and hope to do more with our new friends at the St. Regis.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Gold Award project: Entrepreneurial development in Haiti

My name is Lilli T. and I live in Breckenridge. I am currently working on my Girl Scout Gold Award, which will take place in the Haitian school of St. Paul’s.

Haitian education rates are among the lowest in the western hemisphere with a literacy rate of 61% compared to America’s 86%. Haiti has 15,200 primary schools, 90% of which are non-public and run by religious affiliations. The United States has 66,718 public primary schools. 88% of eligible Haitian students are enrolled in primary school, while 20% are enrolled in secondary school. Secondary and higher level education in provided by public and private institutions. The Haitian government provides very little funds for public schools, only 10% of the government’s budget is spent on public schools. Out of the 67% enrollment rate for primary school, 70% continue to the third grade. 21.5% of the population, age 5+, receive a secondary education, and 1% receive a university level education. 33% of children (ages 6-12) do not attend school.

The school where I will be completing my Gold Award at is named St. Paul’s. St Paul’s school is located in Petit Trou de Nippes, Haiti, a rural coastal town located 80 miles west of the capital, Port-Au-Prince. It was founded in 1990 and began as a one room schoolhouse educating all ages and boys and girls together. It has since grown to a co-ed fall 2016 enrollment of 400+ students ranging from grades K-8. St. Paul’s enrollment fee is $350 per student or $7,000 a class. However, due to the devoted Colorado Haiti Project and its partners, tuition is nearly free to all students.

For my Gold Award, I am partnering with the Colorado Haiti Project and heading their new youth entrepreneurial program for the 8th grade class at St. Paul`s Episcopal School in Petit Trou. I will be organizing a three-day hands-on business workshop that is an opportunity for 8th grader students to “start” small businesses. The students will learn a simplified version of the five fundamentals of business – creating business plan, product, loans, advertising, and how to earn a profit. They will start with thinking about their markets, design, advertising and create a budget. They will then go to the “bank” and take out a loan with which they will visit the “wholesale store” where they will buy the materials for the products they will make. The students will spend a day or two making their products and on the final day a market will be held where they will sell their products. After the sale, they will pay back their loan to the “bank” and are then allowed to visit the wholesale store to buy materials, or candy, to make more products for fun!

My primary goal in completing my Gold Award is to provide these 8th graders, whom some will not continue school after this year, with an enriched education that will help them in the work force. I also hope to educate those in the United States and elsewhere about the education climate in Haiti and encourage them to get involved in making a change!

 

 

 

Adaptive Action Sports is Hometown Hero for Troop 58243

Submitted by Cricket Hawkins

Mountain Communities

Frisco

On April 11, 2017 Troop 52843 delivered a gift basket of Girl Scout Cookies to Adaptive Action Sports at Copper Mountain. The girls met Amy Purdy, her husband, and the staff who all shared some incredible stories about their organization, how they lost their leg(s), and the struggles each has overcome.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

The most fun ever: PA hours completed

40963104_brownie_elf_story_photo

Submitted by Jessica Gentilini

Mountain Communities

Eagle

Girl Scout Cadettes Hailey Gentilini and Olivia Ferzacca from Service Unit 5 (Mountain Communities) recently completed their Program Aide (PA) hours by teaching brand-new Brownie Troop 56349 the Girl Scout Promise and Law and how they relate to us as Girl Scouts. They read the Brownie story and each girl got to take a turn identifying who the Brownie in the reflection was. After the story, the girls learned the Brownie Smile song, made a SWAP, and passed the silent hand-squeeze wish around the circle before twisting around and departing from their first meeting. As Olivia and Hailey reflected on how they thought they did, which was awesome by the way, they both thought working with the Brownies was the most fun ever and can’t wait to plan and run an event for more girls!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

#Grow with Steamboat: World Thinking Day celebration

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Celebrating Girl Scouts World Thinking Day was a BLAST and a badge earning opportunity for 14 troops in Steamboat Springs! Following the WAGGGS #Grow theme, a badge event was coordinated at the Strings Pavilion, in partnership with Strings in the Mountains, a local arts supporter, Colorado State Forest Service, and Yampa Valley Sustainability Council.

From an educational video about WAGGGS and our world centers (made by two Cadette troops) to the “When We Shine” dance choreographed by a Cadette troop, and badge and leadership stations led by Cadette and Senior/Ambassador troops as well as the Forest Service and Sustainability Council, all kicked off by our Silver Award Cadette troop’s flag ceremony, Steamboat Girl Scouts and friends participated in an afternoon session with Girl Scouts of all ages and a special visit from incoming GSCO Board of Directors President, Rae Ann Dougherty to earn the World Thinking Day Challenge badge.

In addition to earning the badge, girls went home with a tree to plant from CSFS AND a discount code to attend a Strings in the Mountains showing of James and the Giant Peach.

This event was sponsored by the Lufkin Family Fund for Girl Scouts in Routt County.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Breckenridge Brownie Troop 55311 donates cookies to Domus Pacis

Submitted by Cricket Hawkins

Mountain Communities

Breckenridge 

Saturday, March 4, 2017 was an exciting evening for the eight girls of Troop 55311! They set up a fabulous table at the Domus Pacis Eagles Tribute Concert in the Riverwalk Center at Breckenridge and wowed the audience during intermission with a presentation about the Girl Scout Cookie Sale Program and their Hometown Hero, Domus Pacis. The girls stood on stage with “Duck” White-Petteruti, Founding Director of Domus Pacis, and read a short script with complete confidence including announcing their goal to donate 250 packages of cookies. Domus Pacis then teased the audience with “good news” … the selling of Girl Scout Cookies … followed by their “sad news” … the audience would not be able to eat any for the cookies were to be donated to Domus Pacis for inclusion in the Welcome Bags they give to each family to enjoy during their respite stay in host homes in Summit County! The patrons, fully aware of this wonderful organization and Girl Scouts of Colorado, were totally on board!
After the presentation, the girls walked through the audience singing “Make New Friends” while heading back to their table to greet the folks who wanted to support their effort. To their surprise, the audience “purchased” enough cookies to supply 430 packages to Domus Pacis for the organization’s Welcome Bags. We are so proud of these young girls and look forward to many more kind deeds from this troop!

Domus Pacis Family Respite is a non-profit organization created with the entire family in mind. Their mission is to offer individuals, who are on a challenging medical journey, a homelike environment that encourages interaction with other family members and caregivers in a comfortable and peaceful surrounding. To learn more about Domus Pacis visit www.domuspacis.org.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

 

Respecting authority

40963104_cso

Submitted by Claudine Norden

Mountain Communities

Frisco

Town of Frisco Community Service Officer Kyle visited our Daisy troop meeting and helped us learn about “respecting authority.” We did an activity on good and bad manners while we had snack. The girls shared examples of authority figures at home, school, and in our community. Then, Officer Kyle talked about the importance of rules and safety in our community.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.