Tag Archives: mountain communities

Gold Award Girl Scout: Christine Bolt, Steamboat Springs, “Camp Bloom”

What did you do for your Gold Award Project?

The issue my project addressed was the lack of summer camp opportunities in our area for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and other varying disabilities. Ultimately, I organized and arranged for a weeklong summer camp for children with autism. Each day was centered around an aspect of camping and outdoor skills, such as: building a fire, setting up a tent, and wildlife awareness. At the end of the week, the kids were to use the knowledge my team and I had taught them to camp away from home for one night.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award Project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact by how happy or excited my campers looked each day. Camp Bloom was for the children more than everything. The name of Camp Bloom was inspired by the different stages of flower growth, with the notion that no matter where one is at, they may continue to grow and learn and experience new things. Now regardless if they retained anything from my camp, the most important aspect is the most powerful one of them all; it’s if they have fun. If they laugh, giggle, or however they express happiness appears, then I feel as though I was successful.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

A local company in our town of Steamboat Springs has agreed to a permanent sponsorship for the next five years. However, if I am unable to continue to assume leadership and be “camp director,” I planned Camp Bloom with the Yampa Valley Autism Program (YVAP), which is an already substantiated organization in the community. By doing so, YVAP can proceed with my program, with the curriculum already created, in the future without me. While not as pertinent, I would like to “train” another Girl Scout in the hopes of her taking over my position and leadership of Camp Bloom. I really like the idea of the two intertwined organizations: YVAP and Girl Scouts.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Dealing with an autism diagnosis is already unsettling enough. Costs for specially devised programs and support are very expensive to begin with. While the state of Colorado has extremely low funding for family aid and autism research, I wanted to create a free camp to grow these kids’ knowledge and educate them on a topic that I very much appreciate and enjoy doing.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that do not, and should not, always need to seek approval in things that I do. I must be confident in my choices and if things go awry, I still need to stay positive and be proud of myself and what I ultimately accomplished. I also learned that it is important to take command and not be afraid to say what I want or prefer. And that prior to Camp Bloom, I was more timid to organizing things than I am now.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Forevermore, I will be able to say that I accomplished something that I am genuinely proud of. This achievement of mine can now be entered into resumes and applications for various things. I now have an idea of how to plan events and just how much work goes into doing such, and this knowledge I will be able to use in the future if need be.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

This project taught me to open my eyes and look at the world around me. To affirm my role in the community and show me how I may influence those around me; and influence my sister Girl Scouts as well.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Of course, I learned to take charge and lead my camp. However, I will say that I definitely had to be a risk-taker for Camp Bloom. This required me to do things I had never done or tried before. I ultimately learned new things and did things through “trial and error.” I had some worries, but by taking chances, it certainly paid off.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Samantha Kucera, Steamboat Springs, “Discovering The Wilderness By Kids For Kids”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a wilderness skills program for kids. Through this program, I have run numerous educational events for more than 230 kids, created an online skills guide, and have a booklet available as a Wilderness Junior Ranger Program at Steamboat Lake State Park and as a patch program with Girl Scouts of Colorado. I created this program because I attended a charter school that taught wilderness skills and my family enjoys camping, backpacking, and hiking.  After learning that I knew unique skills that most of my friends had never learned, I wanted to share them with the kids in my community. My passion for sharing outdoor skills and getting kids into nature gave me a clear focus for my Gold Award.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I was able to see the difference in participants every time I taught them new wilderness skills. I am looking forward to seeing my patch on the back of girls’ uniforms.  I also see incredible changes in my Girl Scout friends who have helped me by teaching skills. Their newfound confidence is inspiring to me.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

This project will be sustained without my involvement through my website, through availability at Steamboat Lake State Park, and through a patch program with Girl Scouts of Colorado. My website will be online until I choose to take it down, which I hope to keep updated instead. The website has all the information I would want to teach any kid, no matter the age. Currently, I have a booklet that guides kids through multiple activities, all teaching them aspects of wilderness skills. This program is active at Steamboat Lake State Park and will be used there for at least a year, but most likely for the foreseeable future. I have another version of this booklet as part of a Girl Scouts of Colorado patch program.  The initial order was for 500 patches, so they intend to advertise my program and keep it active for years to come.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project includes a website, booklet, and a Girl Scout patch. When you look online, there are very few websites teaching wilderness skills for kids. Many are written for older audiences that the younger generations are unable to understand. By creating a website, I am giving kids the tools to learn outdoor skills from anywhere. Girl Scouts of Colorado intends to make my patch available to other councils nationwide. I already have interest in the patch in Illinois, Washington, Arizona, and Wyoming.

What did you learn about yourself?

For my entire life, I have heard about people who do amazing things such as making a business, writing a book, or creating an event. Without the Gold Award, I would have never attempted this large of a project. I conceptualized, planned, and implemented a program at the elementary school for 100 fourth graders, with middle and high schoolers as my team leaders. I wrote a booklet with the outdoor skills I believe are the most important for kids to know. I created my own website for a topic I deeply care about. This multifaceted program was my vision and goal. I shared the skills learned from my family, school, and years of Girl Scouts. Through this project, I learned that I am stronger than I imagined and that making a positive impact on the world is not as hard as I thought.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This project has made me an activist and a leader. My leadership skills will continue to grow because I learned how to turn my vision into reality. In the future, I will be able to let the leader in me show through in everything I do. I cannot wait until I get to see Girl Scouts with my patch on the back of their uniforms, seeing how my Gold Award has affected not only my life, but those around me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award is something very few girls earn. I am proud I can join their ranks. This is the highest award a Girl Scout can earn and is an award most girls never earn. For my final year before I become a Girl Scout troop leader, I made it my goal to earn this prestigious award.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award taught me how to strive for what I never thought I could accomplish. I learned how to go for my dreams and make them a reality. Even when problems arose, I used my innovation to develop my ideas and solve any problems I faced. I have put my program and myself out for the world to see. I took the risk of letting the world see what I am passionate about. Every adult I worked with believed that I am a strong and confident young woman. Leading is what I have been developing my entire life. My Gold Award is my outlet to lead and share my knowledge with kids everywhere. Girl Scouts provided a place for me to learn about myself and become a better G.I.R.L.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Discount for Girl Scouts at Escape Room Breckenridge

Try one of four adventures at Escape Room Breckenridge! You can save a magical owl from a troll in the Wizard School Room, stop a rogue agent and disarm a bomb in the Secret Agent Room, steal a treasure from the Captain Steelhook Room, or break into Santa’s cabin and erase your names from his naughty list. Each adventure is 60 minutes and you must work together to find clues, solve problems, and unlock items in order to “escape” in time! This experience requires teamwork, communication, and collaboration.

Girl Scouts can contact Nicolette Cusick at (970) 286 – 0000 or info@escaperoombreckenridge.com to book your adventure.

The cost is normally $35/person, but there is a $5 off/person for Girl Scouts.

I love my Girl Scout troop

Submitted by Samantha K.

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Everyone has a place they feel most comfortable; whether this is their home, with their friends, on the sports field, or just a special place. Mine is with my Girl Scout troop. Throughout my life, I have been a quiet person and Girl Scouts has made me reach out of my bounds.

My first day of Girl Scouts remains prominent in my memory. It was a sunny afternoon, school had just started and the trees had yet to change. I was in fourth grade, I went to the charter school in north Routt County and had few friends in Steamboat. My mom brought me to the meeting place. Butterflies fluttered wildly in my stomach and I wanted to cry as we approached the meeting. Then the door flew open and a stream of girls flooded out of the building. Immediately, I was engulfed by a swarm of friendly Girl Scouts all my age. They welcomed me into their group like I was the long lost sister they had been looking for. This was my first troop. I learned how to interact with other girls and how to plan and run an event. We were a team, a family.

Slowly this troop changed; people left, people joined, but two of us remained- just Grace and I. Grace is one of my best and longest friends in and out of Girl Scouts. Now the troop is Grace, Julia, Annette, and me. All of them make me feel welcome and help the real world can disappear. When I am with my troop, I act with confidence. All responsibility lifts off my shoulders and I am wrapped in a warm blanket of friendship. After each meeting, I leave feeling replenished as if I had a drink of happiness. In this troop, we support each other. Each of us has issues that drag us down every day, but when together we help each other through anything. This is my happy place. They are my second family.

Our group works to be the leaders Steamboat Girl Scouts need. We were the ones who brought back events that Steamboat had lost. These events are still happening and it has been seven years. At first, our events heavily relied upon the troop leaders, but now we are running them with minor help from adults. I have learned so much but would have never reached this level of confidence without my Girl Scout troop.

Even out of Girl Scouts, we take care of each other and have become better friends because of it. I do not know where my life would be without these amazing people. I do not know who I would be without their influence. The things I have learned have been from not only my troop but Girl Scouts in general. Camp has taught me how to manage myself, events have made me a leader, my troop has made me confident in myself, and my Gold Award project has given me the courage to do the impossible.

Everything that has happened in Girl Scouts has made me a stronger, better person. I have become a G.I.R.L.: go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader, and a person I can be proud of because of Girl Scouts.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scouts go gold panning with author

Submitted by Katie DeBell

Mountain Communities

Kremmling

Girl Scout Troop 50292 of Kremmling met with Kevin Singel, author of the book “Finding Gold in Colorado,” and went gold panning. Kevin showed the girls some of his basic gold panning tools and shared a few different techniques to pan for gold. Each of the girls found a small piece of gold before they were done. It was an amazing experience, many thanks to Kevin!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Service unit trip to Kremmling Cretaceous Ammonite Site

Submitted by Katie DeBell

Mountain Communities

Kremmling

Girl Scout troops from Kremmling, Walden, Granby, Hot Sulphur Springs, and Grand Lake gathered for a tour of the Kremmling Cretaceous Ammonite Site led by Kremmling Girl Scout leader Katie DeBell. Katie did her internship for her bachelor’s degree in geology at the KCAL site. The girls learned a lot and had fun! It was really fun to get together with all the local girls.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Kremmling Girl Scouts attend Troop Trek

Submitted by Katie DeBell

Mountain Communities

Kremmling

Girl Scout Troop 50292 of Kremmling attended Troop Trek in Clark from June 7-9, 2019. The girls were part of a group of 98 girls from all over Colorado. They earned their “First Aid,” “Primitive Camping,” and “Cooking” badges, participated in flag ceremonies, and learned pocket knife skills, orienteering, and knot tying. The girls planned and cooked their own meals, did their own dishes, set up tents, and took care of their own gear. They also competed in a dessert making competition and won “Sailor Moon’s Favorite.” We had 11 girls attend: Darcy D., Kassidy T., Paige D., Kieryn T., Cora O., Isabella L., Suzzen H., Abigail W., Harmoni W., Addy P., and Taylah F. They had a lot of fun, and four of our girls were recognized for good deeds that had been noticed by adults: Suzzen H., Addy P., Cora O., and Harmoni W.

The girls had so much fun. I highly recommend this experience.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Adult volunteers needed in Morgan County

As a way of saying thank you to United Way of Morgan County for their support of Girl Scouts of Colorado and other local nonprofits, Girl Scouts of Colorado is seeking adult volunteers to help with United Way of Morgan County’s “United We Race” event!

When: Saturday, September 7, 2019

Where:

Riverside Park – Nature Trails

1600 Main St

Fort Morgan 80701

Registration: 9 a.m.

Event/Competition: 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

This event is similar in fashion to the famous television show, “The Amazing Race,” where up to 50 teams will start the event. Teams will go to many physical, mental, and unique competition points throughout the event where they will be eliminated. The United Way needs volunteers to help run these competition points.

To sign up to volunteer, please contact Chaundra with the United Way at (970) 867 – 2218 or mcunitedway@kci.net.

If you know older Girl Scouts interested in volunteering, please contact GSCO Donor Relations Manager Carol Griffin at carol.griffin@gscolorado.org.

40963104_volunteers_needed

Kremmling Girl Scouts March in Memorial Day Parade

Submitted by Katie DeBell

Mountain Communities

Kremmling

Troop 50292 of Kremmling marched in the Memorial Day parade in Grand Lake. Girl Scouts carried a banner that had a red poppy with each of their names on it, and carried the WAGGGS flag and the American flag.

These girls were very proud to march as a troop for such a good cause.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Rifle Girl Scout awarded Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund

Girl Scout Victoria W. of Rifle in the Mountain Communities region is headed to Girl Scouts of Colorado summer camp after receiving the Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund. Victoria will attend “Tri-Wizard,” a three-day camp at Tomahawk Ranch in the summer of 2019.  She wrote in her application for this award, “I would like to go to camp because I love to try new things. And learn them to.”

Mary Jo’s four children established the scholarship in December 2014 to honor their mother’s extraordinary legacy. As an 8-year-old girl growing up in 1937, Mary Jo wanted a new pair of roller skates. She wanted them more than anything in world— until she learned her Brownie troop was going to be able to go to summer camp. Mary Jo had to make a choice: spend the $8 she had worked so hard to earn on roller skates or Girl Scout camp? For Mary Jo, the decision was simple. She was going to Girl Scout camp. Mary Jo’s mother walked her to the local Girl Scout office, so she could be the first to register. A reporter for the Artesia Daily Press in New Mexico even wrote a story about Mary Jo and her decision.

After returning home from camp, Mary Jo continued to participate in Girl Scout activities, including going to camp. Eventually, she became a doctor and worked tirelessly to serve the people of Eagle and Garfield Counties, Colorado.

The Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund provides Girl Scouts from Eagle and Garfield counties in Colorado with a scholarship so they can experience the learning opportunities, joy, and camaraderie of attending Girl Scout Camp. “Our hope is that that many girls will have the same positive experience, education and adventure that mom had through her involvement in Girl Scouting and her opportunity to attend Girl Scout camp,” said Dr. Patricia VanDevander, daughter of Dr. Mary Jo Jacobs.