Tag Archives: mountain communities

Three Cheers for Animals with Girl Scout Daisies

Submitted by Nancy Muklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Girl Scout Daisies from Steamboat Springs have been learning more about animals with the “Three Cheers for Animals” Daisy Journey! Before our trip to the Routt County Humane Society, we decided to make something to keep the pets there comfortable. We asked them what might be helpful for their animal guests. We tied fuzzy fleece blankets into pet beds for the cats and dogs we are going to visit! We also made special no bake pumpkin and peanut butter dog treats to share with new friends at the shelter.

We are go-getters: We try new things like tying knots in our blankets. It’s harder than you think!

We are innovators: We work as a team to make sure everyone’s blanket is finished! Sometimes one knot is just as good as the two the pattern describes!

We are risk-takers: We dip our hands into the peanut butter batter to roll it into balls of goodness for our pet friends.

We are leaders: We know that taking good care of animals is a lot like taking good care of ourselves. We all deserve a wonderful life!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scouts visit fire station

Submitted by Katie DeBell

Mountain Communities

Kremmling

Our troop went and visited the fire station to earn our safety badges. The EMS also met us, and we discussed fire safety and basic first aid. Kremmling first responders are AWESOME!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Daisy Petals and Journeys at the fire station

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Girl Scout Daisies from Steamboat Springs were treated to a visit with the Steamboat Springs Fire Department. We were working on our “Respect Authority” Petal AND parts of the “Three Cheers for Animals Daisy” Journey.

We learned that our firefighters eat dinner together, sleep for two nights at a time at the station, help people in car accidents, people that are hurt, put out fires, and help lots of animals!

We learned how to check our bedroom door with the back of our hand to feel if it is hot, if the fire alarm in our house goes off!

We learned about different trucks and all the tools they carry, and that firefighters wear special gear, so fire doesn’t burn them when they save people and pets in a fire.

We learned that firefighters can help pets of all different sizes if the pets have breathed in smoke.

We think you should be a go-getter to be a firefighter. It also helps to be innovative, a risk-taker, and a leader in this job.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Daisy’s Circle supporter spotlight: Nancy Muklow

Tell us about your connection to Girl Scouts.

From Girl Scout Brownie Troop 54 in Wyoming to the present, Girl Scouts have been a part of my life. My fondest memories are of Girl Scout Camp and Wider Opportunities in the United States, Canada, and Norway. In high school, when I moved to the Mountain Prairie council, I was the first to earn my Gold Award there in 1981. I progressed through collegiate Girl Scouting at CSU and led my first Cadette troop in the Wagon Wheel council, and moved to Chipeta where I was Steamboat’s service unit manager until my boys grew into 4H age. I took a hiatus to be in their activities and now continue as service unit manager, Daisy and Cadette leader, Gold Mentor, and former GSCO Board Member and MCC member.

Why did you join Daisy’s Circle?

As a Lifetime Girl Scout, I continue to see the value of Girl Scouts in today’s world. I want to show my continued financial support for Girl Scouts, locally and statewide. As an avid volunteer, it’s only natural to put my money where my volunteer heart beats… Girl Scouts! AND I like the opportunity to join with other like-minded folks to support a movement that is growing and helping to change the world!

Why is monthly giving important?

Monthly giving makes it easy and shows consistent support. It is easy to change the monthly giving amount if circumstances change one way or another.

Why should other people join Daisy’s Circle?

Daisy’s Circle impacts the lives of our Girl Scouts, go-getters, innovators, risk-takers, and leaders. It helps to be sure no girl is left out, that exciting programming continues, and that we ensure a future for this movement for girls!

What is the most valuable thing that Girl Scouts gives girls today?

Girl Scouts gives girls a platform for leadership, a chance to learn together, explore in a safe and adventuresome environment, and experience friendships with a sisterhood of girls and women worldwide.

Why is it important to support Girl Scouts and other youth organizations?

Girl Scouts and other youth organizations give the opportunity to learn about our world and its opportunities, pitfalls, and rising stars. It’s an investment in the future!

Is there anything else you would like us to know about you?

My Girl Scout adventures are endless and they continue to grow each year as I take on leadership of another troop or another event or another mentoring role. As an adult, it’s just as important to me as it was when I was growing up. Many lives are touched by Girl Scouts, both girls and women, and community leaders. I enjoy pulling those worlds together by exploring the world of Girl Scouts!

Named after Girl Scout founder, Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low, Daisy’s Circle is Girl Scouts of Colorado’s monthly giving program. Funds raised through Daisy’s Circle provide financial assistance for girls and volunteers, support Outreach Programs and more.  For more information: https://www.gscodaisyscircle.org/

Cybersecurity STEM fun

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Steamboat Springs Daisy Troop 58028 explored ways to use technology and keep their “treasures” (personal information) safe in a recent STEM day meeting!

The girls created “nests” and learned more about internet safety and creating layers of security in this age appropriate activity.

Through this session, they were excited to earn the Cyber Hero patch that was offered by Palo Alto Networks, the Cyber Innovation Center, and Girl Scouts!

The girls proved to be innovators through the protective materials they chose to line their “nests!” Some of the choices were bubble wrap, tissue paper, and packing paper scraps.

By completing this activity, the girls will earn this special cybersecurity patch. Learn how to earn yours.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girls in STEM: Snow Safety and Snow Science at Keystone Science School

Submitted by Dave Miller

Mountain Communities

Keystone

Keystone Science School is offering a program specifically designed for girls, highlighting careers within snow safety and snow science. Girls in STEM, which runs February 8 – 10, 2019, will teach girls about snow science and a wide variety of careers within snow safety and snow science. The program is open to any girl currently in third – eighth grade. Participating girls will first learn how to cross country ski, which will turn into their mode of transportation for the remainder of the weekend. They will then learn about many aspects of snow science, including the many forms of snow grains, snow metamorphosis, and the many layers within our snowpack. Girls will be digging snow pits and learning how to analyze the snowpack by identifying layers and all the variables which create a stable or unstable snow pack such as the slope, aspect, and different weather events which have influenced the snowpack.

Throughout the weekend, girls will also learn about careers within snow safety and snow science from female professionals working in the field and known to the program as STEM Mentors. Keystone Science School is partnering with Arapahoe Basin Ski Area. The featured STEM Mentor is Lindsay Wiebold, who is on the Arapahoe Basin Ski Patrol. The program will also be supported by ski area snow safety technicians, and member from a local avalanche dog team. These STEM mentors are the cornerstone of the program because girls won’t just learn about various professions, but also the barriers each STEM mentor experienced when entering the field. The barriers can be gender-based through their educational and professional experience, but also any other limiting factor and how each individual STEM mentor handled that barrier.

Program Details

Location: Keystone Science School, 1053 Soda Ridge Road, Keystone, Colorado 80435

Dates and Time: February 8 – 10, 2019

Cost: $175 per participant (includes food, equipment, lodging, and  instruction). Scholarships are available.

More information: (970) 468 – 2098 or Support@KeystoneScienceSchool.org

Website: https://www.keystonescienceschool.org/camp/girls-in-stem

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Apply NOW for the Mary Jo Jacobs Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund

Girl Scouts of Colorado is now accepting applications from Girl Scouts in Eagle and Garfield counties in Colorado for the Mary Jo Jacobs Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund. This annual scholarship helps girls fund their next adventure at Girl Scout Camp. Apply online at: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/scholarshipapp

In June 2018, two Girl Scouts from the Mountain Communities region attended Girl Scouts of Colorado summer camp thanks to the Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund. Both girls chose sessions at Tomahawk Ranch – Cadette Olivia F. of Eagle spent a week honing her outdoor skills and earning an archery badge at “Girl vs. Zombie”.  Brownie Samantha W. of Rifle spent her first week ever away from her parents at “Mermaids” featuring watersports and crafts!

Mary Jo’s four children established the scholarship in December 2014 to honor their mother’s extraordinary legacy. As an 8-year-old girl growing up in 1937, Mary Jo wanted a new pair of roller skates. She wanted them more than anything in world— until she learned her Brownie troop was going to be able to go to summer camp. Mary Jo had to make a choice: spend the $8 she had worked so hard to earn on roller skates or Girl Scout Camp? For Mary Jo, the decision was simple. She was going to Girl Scout Camp. Mary Jo’s mother walked her to the local Girl Scout office, so she could be the first to register. A reporter for the Artesia Daily Press in New Mexico even wrote a story about Mary Jo and her decision.

After returning home from camp, Mary Jo continued to participate in Girl Scout activities, including going to camp. Eventually, she became a doctor and worked tirelessly to serve the people of Eagle and Garfield Counties, Colorado.

The Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund provides Girl Scouts from Eagle and Garfield counties in Colorado with a scholarship so they can experience the learning opportunities, joy, and camaraderie of attending Girl Scout Camp.

“Our hope is that that many girls will have the same positive experience, education, and adventure that mom had through her involvement in Girl Scouting and her opportunity to attend Girl Scout Camp,” said Dr. Patricia VanDevander, daughter of Dr. Mary Jo Jacobs.

Registration for Girl Scout Camp begins January 17, 2019 on the Girl Scouts of Colorado website at girlscoutsofcolorado.org. Girls can attend overnight camp sessions at Sky High Ranch near Manitou Lake and Woodland Park or perennial favorite Tomahawk Ranch near Bailey, southwest of Denver. Activities include archery, backpacking, photography, and rock climbing. Overnight camp runs from 3 to 12 days for girls ages 6 and up.  Girl Scouts of Colorado will continue to offer day camping adventures throughout the state. The summer camp schedule is live on the Girl Scouts of Colorado website (girlscoutsofcolorado.org). Girl Scout summer camp programs are open to all girls throughout Colorado, whether they’re in a troop or not, and new campers get a 10-percent discount.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

X Games viewing for Girl Scouts

The X Games returns to Aspen, Colorado’s Buttermilk Mountain, for the world’s best action sports, music, and festival experience – on snow! All Girl Scouts are invited to an exclusive viewing section of the Women’s Snowboard Slopestyle Final and the Women’s Snowboard SuperPipe on Saturday, January 26, 2019.

11 a.m. – Women’s Snowboard Slopestyle Final

8:45 p.m. – Women’s Snowboard SuperPipe

Girls will also have an opportunity to meet and greet with the female athletes and learn which ones were Girl Scouts. The Women’s Snowboard Slopestyle Final at 11 a.m. will likely be televised and girls should be prepared to be on camera.

This is not a drop-off event. Adult to girl ratios for events must be met. Girls attending with a troop leader should bring a completed parent permission form for a Girl Scout activity that troop leaders will retain for their records.

Register online:

https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2019/girl_scout_x_games_v.html

Registration closes Tuesday, January 22, 2019.

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Daisies earn “Respect Authority” petal

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

At the after school Daisy Club, we have been getting familiar with the 10 parts of the Girl Scout Law. So far, we have earned five Daisy petals. The girls have also earned some “fun patches” for the various places we have toured and visited.

A recent session focused on the “respect authority” piece of the Girl Scout Law. We visited the Steamboat Springs Police Department to see how they help our community and how respecting the laws helps all of us.

The girls got to sit in the patrol car, turn on the lights, see all the tools needed for the job of police officer, and run a radar “gun.” They met a female officer, who shared her insights about her job. Officer Buttermore was a Girl Scout in Colorado when she was growing up!

These Girl Scout Daisies learned how our public service officers lead the way in modeling great behavior. They know that following the rules makes our community a safer place!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twelve Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing Take Action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Brittany Argo from Aurora, Cherokee Trail High School, built a prayer garden at St. Michael’s the Archangel and aided in the construction of a prayer garden at a church in the Philippines.
  • Evyn Batie from Loveland, Mountain View High School, led a team of students to create the Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide, an electronic compilation of some of the best youth mental health resources across the region.
  • Bryce Civiello from Evergreen, Conifer High School, designed a pamphlet for teens that can help them take the first steps toward getting help from a mental health professional.
  • Angela Foote from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, developed a relationship between the organizations Family Promise of Denver and Denver Tech for All to ensure low-resource students and families have ongoing access to computers.
  • Madeline Ford from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Boys & Girls Club to create a five-session literacy program, which promotes a positive reading environment and teaches children new ways to express themselves through books and poetry.
  • Littlepage Green from Breckenridge, Summit High School, created a lesson plan and video to educate students about food allergies. In-person lessons also included training on how to properly use an epi-pen.
  • Maya Hegde from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Mangala Seva Orphanage in India and Brydges Centre in Kenya to teach girls how to make reusable sanitary pads using materials they already have. The program she developed also taught the girls how to sell sanitary pads in their own communities to tackle the stigma around the menstrual cycle.
  • Grace Matsey from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, created a music tutoring program for elementary and middle school musicians, which was run by members of her high school’s Music Honor Society.
  • Annarlene Nikolaus from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon High School, oversaw the construction of a series of buddy benches for local K-12 public schools. Students also participated in age-appropriate lessons led by Annarlene about buddy benches and what they can do to be better friends.
  • Bailey Stokes from Buena Vista, Buena Vista High School, created outdoor-based lesson plans for the use of fourth grade science teachers across Colorado. Topics covered included investigations, habitat, and adaptations.
  • Emma Lily from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a website, created a podcast, and wrote a children’s book celebrating the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory and its historical significance.
  • Katherine Walden from Larkspur, Castle View High School, taught elementary school students about the importance of bees and how to install bee boxes that local bee species and other pollinators can call home.

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership is making the world a better place.”

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.