Tag Archives: mountain communities

Virtual Bingo

Submitted by Christine Kucera

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Steamboat Springs Girl Scout Troops 54313 and 54595 ran a virtual bingo service unit wide event in December. Girls from all levels and multiple troops joined together to play bingo. Prizes were all gift certificates to local businesses. Most were purchased from a grant from the Lufkin Family. Donations were gratuitously given from Deja Vu Boutique with consignment clothes and jewelry; Cowboys and Indians with Native American home goods; and Lyon’s Corner Drug and Soda Fountain with an old fashioned soda jerk with specialty ice cream. Girls were excited to play bingo cards with different themes of holiday words, song titles, and Girl Scout words. Fortunately, everyone won a prize and a patch. While it’s hard to get together and have fun during this COVID isolation, Steamboat had a great time virtually while supporting our community!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She was at the can send in her story here.

Steamboat Springs Blessing Bags

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Girl Scout troops in Steamboat Springs teamed up to bring joy to others this holiday season! Donations were made by troops and families so that Senior Troop 54538 could put together blessing bags for others. The festive bags contained all sorts of useful items: warm gloves, toothbrushes, toothpaste, snacks, and more. There were also holiday gifts, cookies, candy, and stickers. Toys and craft items were also purchased by the troop courtesy of grant funds from the Lufkin Fund for Routt County Girl Scouts. More than 40 blessing bags were delivered to the local food bank and will be given to children who use the food bank this holiday season.

These girls were go-getters, getting this done, even amidst a pandemic!

Innovators: They brainstormed ways to pack and deliver the bags while managing social distancing.

Leadership: This troop took the lead in managing the blessing bag project for more than 40 children.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Election 2020: Pizza, Cupcakes, and Badges

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Election season has been a learning opportunity for Girl Scouts in Steamboat Springs! Senior Troop 54538 has been using election season to discover more about the process. From a visit to the County Clerk’s Elections Office to researching how other countries vote, to creating our own campaigns, these innovative Girl Scouts have been finding out more about voting. Along with that, while learning more about various offices and running effective meetings, we recently created a pizza using parliamentary procedure ~ the Parli Pro Pizza!

The Behind the Ballot badge is a perfect way to educate future voters AND have fun too!  We ended our campaign season with an election-themed cupcake challenge. Tayla’s and Aylen’s creations represented the bipartisan system. Jacey’s cupcakes represented the Green party and the multi-layered nature of a political campaign. Catherine’s creation reminded us to think outside the box and do your homework when voting. Elizabeth got right to the point with the vote-themed cupcake!

These go-getters are finding out more about our election system, how the mail-in ballots work, and how accountable our counties are when it comes to voting. There are lots of checks and balances and safety nets to be sure all of our votes are counted! They realized that sometimes it takes being a risk-taker to get your voice heard.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

National Council Session 2020 was a Success

Submitted by Christine Kucera

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

The 2020 Girl Scout National Council Session was a total success. With more than 1,200 people on a virtual platform, we were able to get down to business, navigate through parliamentary procedure, and approve six proposals. Was it cumbersome, difficult, and frustrating? Of course. There are always people who have nothing positive to say. There are always people who just want to quit. There are always people who think it’s not fair. But at the end of the weekend when all the proposals passed, I felt that I made a difference. My voice was heard. I made the Girl Scout Movement better.

I am sad we couldn’t meet in-person. There were no special speakers, no breakout seminars, and no convention hall. My troop planned to go to Orlando to experience SWAPS on a national scale, bonding with other Ambassadors, and traveling without their families. BUT, as when I attended in person in 2017, the National Council Session still sent me back to normal life with a renewed sense of dedication.

I made a difference. I changed Girl Scout policy for the better. I have green blood running through my veins. I am motivated to try to run troop camp in June. I am motivated to provide virtual events that will be fun for all ages. I am motivated to give my girls the best experience I can, especially in this virtual world.

Even though I never met most of the fellow delegates, I feel connected to them. We all joined together in Zoom calls and a chat app that helped us discuss the topic at hand. We gained insight into everyone’s personalities and needs. We bonded over the October snow, forest fires, and our hobbies. I may never have met most of our delegation, but I know their Girl Scout souls. I wouldn’t trade that for anything. I have new sisters.

At the morning song sessions, the amazing crew performed a song that I had forgotten, and it struck a chord with me. My mother sang “On the Loose” to me when I was little. I did not remember the words, but I knew every note that was coming and could hum along with the group. The tune is stuck in my head and am thankful for the memory that NCS sparked for me.

During the National Convention Session, I saw first-hand the end result of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Girls from around the country gave their opinion and practiced parliamentary procedure in front of more than 1,200 people. The G-Team presented their report on mental health during COVID. Girl Delegates and Alternates from our great state of Colorado spoke up and got involved. I can only hope that my leadership and mentoring guides the girls in my troop achieve the levels of greatness I observed during NCS.

Fortunately, this was my second term as a delegate. I understood the procedure and flow of the NCS. I could imagine what things would have looked like if we were in-person. I felt a personal connection to each delegate from other councils that said “hi” in the chat. Now that I have more experience, I plan to be involved in sponsoring a proposal to make virtual sessions run more smoothly. I am hopeful that I can renew my service as a delegate to GSCO in 2023. I will continue working to become a true G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, and leader).

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

My Silver Award Project: The History of Women’s Rights

Submitted by Gracelyn R.

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

While working on the Girl Scout Ranger 19th Amendment patch, I realized that not enough girls know about their history. This inspired me to create a website educating girls, so that they may become informed and aware. The website link is: www.thehistoryofwomenssuffrage.com. The website has educational videos and fun activities to do.

The main purpose for my project is to educate girls about their history, for I believe that educated girls make for great leaders. If we all try to change the world, a little at a time, we can make a difference.

If we look to the past, we can find inspiration about how to shape the future. The first step is to learn about the history that made the present possible. This is the ultimate purpose of my Silver Award project. It is my belief that if girls know where they came from, they can better plan where they’re going. They can lead the way forward and innovate in hopes of a better world. Changing the world isn’t easy. It takes hard work and risk-taking, as well as a whole lot of courage. But if we all promise to change the world, a little at a time, we really can make a difference.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Steamboat Springs Junior Troop 56342 Takes on COVID for Troop Meetings

Girl Scout Junior Troop 56342 of Steamboat Springs wanted to share their creative ways to have a troop meeting during the current pandemic! Before GSCO guidelines were updated on October 14, 2020, the troop developed a fabulous “sanitization station” and kaper chart for meeting precautions.

The girls are very serious about checking temperatures pre and post meeting – check out the picture of their kaper chart and sanitization station. They also created a health screening log. The group also engineered some new and improved sit-upons for their social distancing! Of course, the girls will have to add their troop leader’s names to the kaper chart for temperature taking now that the guidelines have been updated.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Sidney Barbier, Steamboat Springs, “State Park Waste Diversion”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My project is focused on State Park Waste Diversion. However, a huge part of my project is focused on educating the public on the basics of recycling and waste diversion in hopes to inspire and empower future generations to make a difference and share their knowledge with the world! My project branched into a variety of pieces such as a staff orientation to educate staff at Colorado state parks on the basics of waste diversion so that they can help share their knowledge. I worked to create a Junior Ranger curriculum that includes reduce, reuse, recycle guidelines. I did my own in-person waste sorts with the public in order to bring awareness and get helpful data as an insight into the issue of recycling contamination. To help further knowledge of recycling, I developed and posted signage that is both sustainable and durable that will help educate people and empower them to make the right choice! Every piece of my project aims at sustainability of our amazing state parks for future generations of girls to enjoy.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

My initial plan was to measure my project’s success at Steamboat Lake by doing a beginning and end waste sort, however due to the COVID-19 pandemic, I instead found success in my project based on the number of people I was able to reach and on all levels, from staff, visitors, the public, and Girl Scouts of all ages. I was able to see this based on the number of views on my YouTube Channel, blog, and Facebook. In addition, simply posting the signage made a huge difference in the amount of contamination in the trash and recycling as observed by park employee Eric Young. When I was at Steamboat Lake posting the signage, I had multiple staff members come up to me and say how thankful they were for my presentation at their staff orientation and how much they learned. I was visibly able to see the impact education truly has on people of all backgrounds and ages. People gained new knowledge on the basics of waste diversion, the what, why, and how of recycling, as well as what individuals can do in the community to help reduce their own waste. I taught many young girls how to do their very own waste sort at home and how to set up their own successful recycling systems. My impact was measured throughout my project in less quantifiable means then I had intended, but the overall impact was based on the overall increase in knowledge and education around where our waste is truly going. I started the conversion, and I will continue to help be a part of it.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

In order to ensure the sustainability and longevity of my project beyond my involvement, I created and developed a letter of commitment that was signed by Kelly Cook, my project advisor and the administrative assistant of Steamboat Lake State Park, that ensures commitment by the state park to maintain the vision and goals of my project through a series of detailed and specific commitments. The letter of commitment lays out each part of my project and the resources available in order for the state park to continue my work. For each step of my project, I worked to make it sustainable for future use. For example, I uploaded videos of my staff orientation presentation to YouTube to be available for future use. I created a waste sort kit to be available to each seasonal interpreter for further use in park programs. I created signage that will last for at least two years and can be easily repurchased for continued educational awareness. I provided a PDF of resources from Yampa Valley Sustainability Council as well as the Junior Ranger program to be reprinted, reused, and recycled to continue the use of these resources for both the public, visitors, and young kids. By signing this letter of commitment, Steamboat Lake Park has committed to maintaining my project vision, goals, and mission beyond my involvement in order to increase waste diversion and recycling to make the state parks more sustainable for future generations to enjoy.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I met and coordinated with Girl Scouts of Colorado staff member Anna Danilla in order to find ways to share and integrate my Gold Award Project with the  Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend event. I ended up creating a blog post coupled with pictures that share the basics about my project and the relationship to state parks. In addition, I shared my Project Greenify YouTube Channel as online resources for the virtual piece of the Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend, September 12 and13, 2020. The blog information and YouTube link was posted on Girl Scouts of Colorado website, Facebook, and sent out in RSVP emails to reach potentially 1,000 girls and their family’s and share my project with Girl Scouts beyond Routt County.

What did you learn about yourself?

One of the biggest things I learned about myself throughout the whole project is that I truly do have the power to make a difference. Through perseverance, patience, passion, and hard work, I was able to make an impact on other people and the environment as a whole. I learned that I have the ability to lead and collaborate with others to create something achievable. I didn’t simply write down lofty goals, I achieved them. I learned that my passion for the environment and the human-environment interaction, is not something that will go away. It is a true passion that I want to continue to learn about, study, and share in my future and beyond. I learned what direction I want my life to take; I want to study environmental science and policy in college and beyond.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award has not only given me the confidence that I can change the world, but the tools to continue to make a difference. In my future, I will use my Gold Award experience as a segue into having a more lasting impact and continuing to share my passion for environmental science with the world. Being a Gold Award Girl Scout will help in every application and interview for college and beyond. It has given me the leadership skills that will apply to every situation life throws at me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The journey towards earning my Gold Award was a truly unique experience and was a perfect cumulative experience of everything I have learned and gained from Girl Scouts since I was in kindergarten. I used the basics of the Girl Scout Promise to “use resources wisely” and turned it into a sustainable and achievable project. I took initiative and worked to serve my community as I had been taught to do throughout my years as a Girl Scout. I feel that earning my Gold Award was an achievement I had always dreamed of. Ever since I saw the Gold Award Girl Scouts as my troop received our Silver Award, I knew I wanted to one day stand up there and present how I used Girl Scouts as a forum for making a difference.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Throughout my Gold Award journey, I was able to strengthen and develop a multitude of leadership skills. I believe that one of the greatest skills I gained was in collaboration. I learned to practice balancing independence with reaching out to my team for help, support, feedback, and advice. Along with collaboration came innovation. In both dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic and simply working towards sustainability for my project, I was able to demonstrate leadership in using my own confidence and delegation skills to continue my project moving forward. I continue to reach out to organizations and team members, and did not simply stand by idly during the strict period of quarantine. I became a real “go-getter,” as I used my drive and motivation along with a positive mindset to find creative solutions, by creating virtual material such as Project Greenify, finding ways to coordinate with Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend, and posting signage in a socially distant way. I developed skills in public speaking as I stepped up to a position of leadership and led waste-sort, staff orientation, public presentations, and Girl Scout events. I continually practiced accountability as I took responsibility for keeping up with my target dates, setting up my own meetings, and focusing on time management in order to accomplish each of my goals. I stepped up to become a coordinator, decision-maker, and active listener, as I became involved in other organizations such as state parks, and Yampa Valley Sustainability Council. The Gold Award experience has truly brought out my initiative and commitment to taking a stand and becoming an influential G.I.R.L.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Silver Award Girl Scout: The History of Women’s Suffrage

Submitted by Gracelyn

Mountain Communities

Cowdrey

My Silver Award project started when I began the Nineteenth Amendment Girl Scout Ranger Patch. In it was a section encouraging me to teach other girls about the women’s suffrage movement. Because I love history, I was inspired to create a website to teach younger girls about women’s history.

My goal with my Silver Award project was to educate younger girls about their history as women, so as to build a future generation of G.I.R.L.s. In the time of COVID-19, however, it was going to be hard to reach girls. This was where the website came from. With the upcoming election, it’s more important than ever for girls to be informed, and I really hope that those girls who learn about their history and their rights will be inspired to take action in the world around them. The girls of today will be the G.I.R.L.s of tomorrow.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

I 💚 Fall Product Program: Lexi from Dillon

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s 2020 Fall Product Program is now underway, and there’s still plenty of time for you to get started! Fall Product Program is a great way for troops (both new and existing) to earn proceeds to use for Girl Scout activities throughout the year or to get one step closer to reaching their next goal. All troops receive 13% of their magazine orders as troop proceeds, plus $1/per item for nuts and chocolates sold.

GSCO Media Star and Girl Scout Lexi  from Dillon told us what she likes about this program:

How many years have you participated in Fall Product Program?

I have participated in the Fall Product Program for three years now. 

Do you like creating an avatar that looks like you? Do you record a message too?

I like creating an avatar that looks like me. It gives it a little bit more of a personal touch. I do not record a voice message. 

What do you like about having an online storefront? Is it easy to connect with family, friends and other customers? Is it fun to use?

I like having an online storefront because it allows me to reach my family and friends that don’t live near me. It is fun to use because I can track my sales. 

What tips for success would you share with girls who are participating for the first time?

If you are participating for the first time, try to get started right away and ask friends and family and teachers if they would like to support you.

What nut or candy item (s) do your customers like best?

My customers like the Dark Chocolate Sea Salt Caramels, Pecan Supremes, and Mint Trefoils Vintage Compass Tin the most. 

What has your troop done with Fall Product Program troop proceeds that you’ve earned?

My troop has used the Fall Product Program proceeds to go on fun trips, such as the trip we took to Glenwood Caverns and hot springs. 

What’s the coolest reward that you have earned?

The coolest reward I have earned would be the 100th anniversary blanket. 

Thank you, Lexi, for sharing your experience and tips with other Girl Scouts!

Want to participate? You’ll find the M2OS log-in instructions and set-up instructions, family guides, and an order card that shows all girl rewards are on the Fall Product Program page of the GSCO website. Parents/caregivers can also watch the How to Get Started in M2OS – For Families video and learn how to help their Girl Scout.

Need more information? Go to the Fall Product Program page on our website: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/cookies/fall-product-program.html and check out the Fall Product Program weekly update videos posted to the GSCO Facebook page and YouTube channel.

Questions about Fall Product Program or need assistance? We are here to support you! Contact GSCO customer care at 1-877-404-5708 or email inquiry@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend: Project Greenify, a Girl Scout Gold Award Project

 

Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend is coming up September 12 – 13, 2020! This year, girls can participate virtually or in–person by visiting select Colorado State Parks to participate in self–guided activities like nature trails, junior ranger programs, activity backpacks, and more! RSVP and learn more here: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2020/girl_scouts_love_sta.html

Leading up to this event, we want to showcase a fantastic Girl Scout Gold Award project related to state parks, “Project Greenify,” from Sidney B.  Read on to learn more about Sidney’s project:

My name is Sidney. I am currently a Junior in high school at Steamboat Mountain School. I have been a Girl Scout since I was in kindergarten and am currently working towards earning my Gold Award, which is the highest honor you can receive as a Girl Scout. My project is focused on state park waste diversion. However, a huge part of my project is focused on educating the public on the basics of recycling and waste diversion in hopes to inspire and empower future generations to make a difference and share their knowledge with the world! My project branched into a variety of pieces such as a staff orientation to educate staff at state parks on the basics of waste diversion so that they can help share their knowledge. I worked to create a Junior Ranger curriculum that includes reduce, reuse, and recycle guidelines. I did my own in-person waste sorts with the public in order to bring awareness and get helpful data as an insight into the issue of recycling contamination. To help further knowledge of recycling, I developed and posted signage that is both sustainable and durable that will help educate people and empower them to make the right choice! Every piece of my project aims at sustainability of our amazing state parks for future generations of girls to enjoy.

As you may know, September 12 and 13 is Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend! This is a chance to celebrate our state parks and the amazing opportunities and wild spaces they protect while giving way for changing our environment for the better.

As a piece of my Gold Award project, I have created a YouTube Channel called Project Greenify to share fun and educational videos for Girl Scouts across Routt County and Colorado. I have created a series of three different videos along with attached resources. The first is a general overarching introduction to waste diversion and recycling, and teaches the basics of environmental stewardship. The second video teaches how to do your very own waste sort at home and learn why our waste matters. The third video is a fun activity called “Birds and Worms’ and is designed for young Brownies and Daisies. By watching these videos and completing these activities, Girl Scouts are continuing the legacy of environmental stewardship, using resources wisely, and making the world a better place! In addition, Girls will be able to work towards earning their “eco” badges.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.