Tag Archives: mountain communities

Glenwood Springs Girl Scout awarded Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund

Girl Scout Allie A. of Glenwood Springs in the Mountain Communities region is headed to Girl Scouts of Colorado summer camp after receiving the Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund. Allie will attend “Intro to Cowgirl Mountain,” a five-day camp at Sky High Ranch in the summer of 2019.  She wrote in her application for this award, “Next year, I will start middle school. I am scared and nervous. I am excited, but I do not feel like I have the confidence I need. I feel going to an overnight camp by myself, without my family, to be around other girls who are already in middle school will get my confidence up.”

Mary Jo’s four children established the scholarship in December 2014 to honor their mother’s extraordinary legacy. As an 8-year-old girl growing up in 1937, Mary Jo wanted a new pair of roller skates. She wanted them more than anything in world— until she learned her Brownie troop was going to be able to go to summer camp. Mary Jo had to make a choice: spend the $8 she had worked so hard to earn on roller skates or Girl Scout camp? For Mary Jo, the decision was simple. She was going to Girl Scout camp. Mary Jo’s mother walked her to the local Girl Scout office, so she could be the first to register. A reporter for the Artesia Daily Press in New Mexico even wrote a story about Mary Jo and her decision.

After returning home from camp, Mary Jo continued to participate in Girl Scout activities, including going to camp. Eventually, she became a doctor and worked tirelessly to serve the people of Eagle and Garfield Counties, Colorado.

The Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund provides Girl Scouts from Eagle and Garfield counties in Colorado with a scholarship so they can experience the learning opportunities, joy, and camaraderie of attending Girl Scout Camp. “Our hope is that that many girls will have the same positive experience, education and adventure that mom had through her involvement in Girl Scouting and her opportunity to attend Girl Scout camp,” said Dr. Patricia VanDevander, daughter of Dr. Mary Jo Jacobs.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Silverthorne

Nearly 30 Girl Scouts, along with their friends and family, gathered at Silverthorne Pavilion in Silverthorne on May 9, 2019 to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 26 Girl Scouts in the Mountain Communities region earned the Bronze Award. 18 girls across the Mountain Communities region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

Highest Award recipients are perfect examples of girls who lead the Girl Scout way. Taking the lead like a Girl Scout means being a go-getter who is bold, honest, and determined to succeed; an innovator who thinks outside the box; a risk-taker who is willing to try new things; and a leader who leads with empathy,” she said.

2018 Gold Award Girl Scout and winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Riley Morgenthaler served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how earning the Girl Scout Gold Award has impacted her life.

Every time I think that the Gold Award has given me everything it possibly can, I get a new, amazing opportunity; use the tremendous number of skills it taught me; or receive unexpected feedback from the community I targeted with my project. I am so amazed to see how my project has continued to grow wings and impact even more people, ” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Earth Day clean-up in Kremmling

Submitted by Katie DeBell

Mountain Communities

Kremmling

To celebrate Earth Day, Girl Scout Troop 50292 of Kremmling picked up trash to clean up our town on Sunday, April 28, 2019. We cleaned up at the fairgrounds, Hospital Park, and all around the high school park, skate park, and track areas. The girls competed for largest volumes and weight of trash collected. The winner by weight was Taylah F. and the winner by volume was Suzzen H. Also participating was Paige D., Darcy D., Lillyana W., Sonya W., Shiloh F., Bella L., Abigail W., and Harmoni W. All the girls did an amazing job and collected a lot of trash!

These girls love taking care of their community!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

World Thinking Day in Steamboat #TimeToLead

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

World Thinking Day was a #TimeToLead in Steamboat Springs this year. More than 70 girls from 13 troops participated in a girl-led event after school on a Friday!

The event was planned by an eighth grade Juliette and led by the Cadette troops. The Time Machine theme was inspired by the WAGGGS World Thinking Day curriculum to earn the Thinking Day Badge for #WTD2019. Stations to explore the past, present, and future of Girl Scouts and WAGGGS carried out the theme of “110 Years of Adventure!”

A special visit by GSCO Board Chair Rae Ann Dougherty and Rich Dougherty were a highlight of the event, as each girl had the opportunity to earn the special patch Rae Ann shares on her visits around the state.

These go-getter Cadettes led stations that were based on adventures in the World Centers. One was “Spot the Leader,” practicing some silent skills of a leader. Another was creating skits using recycled objects. And, “Fact or Fiction” involved learning more about the history of Girl Scouts and Girl Guiding. Innovation included using our dollars to donate to the World Thinking Day fund by voting on our passions. Girls can make healthy choices for themselves and others, stay safe online, and raise their voices and be heard! Our risk-takers learned and shared a WTD dance using the song, “Broken and Beautiful,” from the new movie Ugly Dolls. The dance was choreographed by Taylor Graham, the event organizer.
Leadership and Time To Lead were the theme of the day as more than 14 Cadettes from five troops led stations showcasing different aspects of leadership skills. As well, origami swaps were created under the lead of Cadettes in Troop 52622 and members of our local SuperTroop stepped up to lead the flag ceremony and the closing friendship circle.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Christine Kucera

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Christine Kucera of Steamboat Springs in the Mountain Communities region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Christine to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I’ve become a Girl Scout volunteer for many reasons. First, I volunteered to become a troop leader while in college at Illinois State University. I missed all of the fun activities and my connection to younger girls. I felt that I had a lot to share with a group of Brownies. I had a wonderful time taking them camping and teaching them what I remembered as most special to me.

After I got married and moved to California, I volunteered again. I wasn’t ready to have children of my own yet, but again missed my connection with girls. I became very involved with a troop of girls through Juniors and Cadettes. We taught them life skills, took them canoeing, camping, and skiing.  One of them had never seen snow and now takes her family skiing.

We moved to Colorado and took a break from volunteering to spend more time on the slopes and raising children. I resisted volunteering for a while because I felt that I was too busy with my two children. My kids went to a small local charter school north of Steamboat Springs and I realized that my daughter needs to get to know more town kids to help ease her eventual integration into the high school. I was able to find a Girl Scout troop that would hold off starting the meeting after school until we could arrive. This was a nice sized troop that had lots of fun playing games and singing songs, but was not doing any badges. I was hoping to have my daughter enjoy Girl Scouts without her mom as the leader, but I stepped in and helped. I led this troop through Bronze and Silver awards, trained them to win Reach for the Peak, and am guiding them down their paths to the Gold Award. Girl Scouts has become an important part of my soul.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I now have many roles in Girl Scouts. I am a Senior/Ambassador troop leader, member of the local Girl Scout grant committee, Mountain Communities region volunteer trainer, local troop camp director, and 2018 National Delegate. My troop and I lead many local events each year, ranging from bridging, World Thinking Day, cookie rallies, monthly multiage group meetings, and annual troop camp. I am a trainer for adults, especially 101 and Camping and Cooking. I am the trainer for Program Aides and soon Volunteer in Training. I plan and implement PA-run troop camp for Juniors and older each summer. I was honored to be selected as a National Delegate and want to take my troop to the National Convention in Florida in October 2020.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that when girls are challenged, they step up and can accomplish anything. I have seen Daisies learn how to use a compass, tie lashing, and do dishes for all of camp with more maturity than the average middle schooler. I have seen girls struggle with the stress of the Reach for the Peak Competition, immediately start planning their next year’s theme and come back two years later to win the Peak Award. My troop ran a local older girl super troop, teaching outdoor skills, Girl Scout ceremonies, songs and games, and had girls repeatedly ask me when I will be healthy enough to start it up again this year until I got it scheduled. I have watched my daughter work diligently for a year and a half on her Gold Award, only to say “I know I could be done at this point, but I want to go bigger and make a real difference.” I have girls from my California troop who contacted me over Facebook and reminisce with me about the things we did and how they are sharing those things with their families. I have learned that everything I do with Girl Scouts makes a lasting impact on young women and it makes me feel inspired every time I see an unspoken thank you.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that girls learn to pass on their strengths while improving their weaknesses. My greatest hope is they realize that they are role models for people younger and older than themselves and they can make as big of an impact as they desire.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My greatest desire is to give my daughter amazing experiences that help her through her life journey. While trying to accomplish this, I have stepped up and become a go-getter. I have had to come up with innovative ways to share everything I know and teach her things I am learning for the first time. I have taken risks that I would not have dreamed of before that have made me a stronger person. Have I become a better leader than before? I think that goes without saying. Even more importantly than my personal growth, I have watched all the girls I’ve interacted with turn in a G.I.R.L. by following my example. Girl Scouts makes all of us better women.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

Gold Award Girl Scout: Kayla Davis, Granby, “NSCD Moves in the Mountains”

    

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I built an adaptable obstacle course for the National Sports Center for the Disabled (NSCD). The course, called the NSCD Moves Course, is fully adaptable for anyone with any ability or disability, from being blind to being in a wheelchair. To make this course, I used ideas from the course located in the Denver Metropolitan area. I made improvements and updates to the obstacles to make them safer, more fun, and adaptable.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

To measure the impact my course made, I get feedback from participants after running the course and make observations regarding safety of obstacles while it is being run. I also talked to the College and Careers class at my school and was able to discuss the impacts. It is something that people rarely know about and think about when it comes to career options.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

NSCD is an organization that is constantly adapting and changing to incorporate new equipment. They are always upgrading equipment that they currently have to make it more comfortable and safer for the user. My NSCD Moves course will have obstacles added to it through the years, and the organization will keep the course in prime condition, so it is always participant ready. My course can be sustained and upgraded in the future by younger Girl Scouts as Bronze and Silver Award projects. Just having the foundation of the 10 obstacles makes it so the NSCD can change the course to be at any difficulty level they want and be able to add any obstacles they could need. After my involvement, the course will travel around Grand County and will be used to impact people from all around the world who travel here for NSCD programs.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

To show my project to the world, I constructed a website. I sent the web address to several therapeutic recreation centers around the country, so they would be able to see what an obstacle course like the NSCD Moves course can do to benefit participants. The NSCD also attracts many people from all over the country, and even the world, to see their innovative take on therapeutic recreation and how they are implementing the programs that they have. https://sites.google.com/egsd.org/nscd-moves-in-the-mountains/home.

What did you learn about yourself?

During this project, I had to really focus on and develop the leadership skill of communication. Before I began my Gold Award, I had never been good at communication and communicating in a timely manner. I used to just make plans on a whim and usually, it would work out. Having to put this together really showed me that I had much to improve on when it came to communication skills, especially when I am in a leadership position. The team involved in this project was very adamant about me having a set schedule at least two weeks in advance. After completing the project, I still have a long way to go with improving my communication skills, but I learned where I have a weak spot and now I can work to improve it. I have also learned some valuable skill in perseverance, as I had to cancel the work days for two weekends due to bad weather.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This process has taught me several valuable life lessons and skills. I learned to organize group activities, as well as how to use the dynamics of the group that I was working with to the best of my ability. This award has also taught my how to write a grant. Since then, I have written a few grants for clubs in my school. This project also opens even more doors for me with college and the military. I have been looking at going into the Air Force through ROTC and this project has given me some of the leadership skills that I will need to succeed in such a program.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

My Gold Award allowed me to connect with my community in a way that I had not been able to in the past. With Girl Scouts, I have been a leader-in-training since the fourth grade. Being able to achieve the Gold Award shows me I have not only become a leader in my community, but that these skills learned through Girl Scouts will continue to impact me through the rest of my life.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

The Gold Award taught me the importance of innovation. To improve on this course, I had to come up with new ideas to not only make the course safer, but more fun as a whole. Wanting to go into an engineering field in college, it is important for me to develop the innovator aspect of being a G.I.R.L. as it is something that I will need to be able to do for the rest of my life.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Origami cranes for cancer patients

Submitted by Katie DeBell

Mountain Communities

Kremmling

Girl Scout Troop 50292 of Kremmling made origami cranes at their meeting on Sunday, March 10, 2019 to donate to cancer patients. There is a Japanese tradition that 1,000 origami cranes will grant a wish, such as a wish for long life or cure from an illness. These cranes will be sent to http://cranesforcancer.blogspot.com/ in the name of a relative of a girl in our troop, #TeamHozhoonii, also found on Facebook. Hozhoonii is a 13-year-old girl with a rare for of leukemia, type ALL. This website collects 1,000 cranes and sends them to nominated cancer patients with a wish for a cure. If anyone would like to make a paper crane to donate, follow the link and give a smile to someone who really needs it! http://cranesforcancer.blogspot.com/.

Helping others makes us smile.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scouts from Eagle earn Silver Award

Olivia F. and Hailey G. from Eagle wrapped up their Silver Award with a fun and informational talk with the local 4H Clover Buds about rabbit care. The girls saw a need at their 4H barn for rabbit pens, so more children could have an opportunity to raise animals and learn about responsibility. After asking and receiving permission from the Rocky Mountain 4H Board, they recycled some pens, scrubbed and cleaned them, and provided new rabbit supplies. Both girls really grew in their public speaking skills and have much more confidence in speaking with both adults and children. They are also looking ahead to earning their Gold Award and can’t wait to get started. Way to go, Hailey and Olivia!

Gold Award Girl Scout: Summer Gehman, Littleton, “The Roundup River Library”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I built a library at Roundup River Ranch. The camp is for children who have or have had life-threatening illnesses. Due to the children having these illnesses, they are missing school and their literacy rates are dropping. The library that was built at the camp to address that problem, along with giving the campers something to do.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

To measure the impact on my project, I went directly to the people who are going to be using it. I asked the campers for their feedback and also got families and camp staff to give me feedback. Through their feedback, I was able to see how my project was going to affect the campers.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

To make sure that my project would continue after I finished it, I asked my project supervisor to sign a letter of commitment. On top of a letter of commitment, I left extra supplies for the checkout system, so it would last them longer. Lastly, the camp helped me come up with the idea of the library.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

For my global connection, I ended up working with a non-profit organization located in Kentucky called the International Book Project. This organization works with third world countries to increase literacy rates.

What did you learn about yourself?

This project helped me learn a lot of good and bad things about myself. One of the main things that I was able to learn was that I am not a people person and like to have my alone time to work on my projects. I also got to see how much of a perfectionist I was and was able to learn that not everything has to be perfect.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The Gold Award will help me in the future because I was able to work on many of the skills that I needed. For example, I learned to be a team member, instead of doing it all on my own. Also, I grew to have stronger leadership skills that will help me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it let me go higher in Girl Scouts. Also, it helped me become an inspiration for the little girls in Girl Scouts to keep going.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Through this project, I have grown as a leader in so many ways. One way that I have grown as a leader is not being afraid to tell someone that they are doing something wrong. Before the project, I was afraid to talk to adults, but also to tell them they are doing something wrong since they are older than me. I also grew to be a risk-taker through the project. I took the risk of setting the final date of my project so close to my approval date. That was a risk because it was about a month to complete the library.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Cookies for Hometown Heroes

Submitted by Katie DeBell

Mountain Communities

Kremmling

The Girl Scout Troop 50292 of Kremmling delivered their Hometown Hero Girl Scout Cookies at the school board meeting on March 12, 2019. The Hometown Heroes is a program in which the girls get to choose an organization in their community to donate cookies to, and this year the girls chose their teachers. They started with a pretty good list of well-deserving organizations, but their teachers won by an overwhelming majority. They were delighted to present their teachers with 204 packages of cookies, each of which had a sticky note on it thanking their heroes.

These girls love their teachers!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.