Tag Archives: Metro Denver

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Carissa Flores, Westminster, “Inform, Protect, Take Action”

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What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created, coordinated, and led three separate age-related self-defense seminars: children, teens, and adults each with individual curriculum an average of 30 people, 90 people total and started the Women’s Self-Defense Club at Broomfield High School which currently meets once month for an hour with a different focus area of self-defense each month.

At the children’s seminar, I taught for about an hour and 15 minutes then presented a five-minute video to the kids so they could respond to real life situations. At the teen’s and adult’s seminar, I had the Blue Bench present for the first 15 minutes then taught for about an hour. The curriculum, in general, was the same but used different scenarios.

My club empowers and teaches women how to protect themselves against sexual assault; I develop curriculum, run meetings, teach self-defense. The Broomfield High School Family and Consumer Science department is implementing my curriculum into their courses and having me or another instructor from my Taekwondo school come teach self-defense to their classes.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I had an entry and exit survey for each seminar age group which all displayed a positive trend of the attendee’s knowledge and self-confidence of self-defense growing. I have the most recent data for the City and County of Broomfield from 2014 and 2013 that shows a decline in the rate of rape in Broomfield.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

The creation of my Women’s Self-Defense Club at Broomfield High School was the most successful part of my project. It is the one thing that will keep on going after I graduate from Broomfield High School. I have a letter of commitment from my two club sponsors and principal stating that the club will continue and sponsor an annual self-defense seminar and that my sponsor from the Family and Consumer Science department will implement my curriculum into her courses and have me or another instructor from my Taekwondo school, once I graduate come teach self-defense to her classes. At my seminar, I gave two-week free passes to my Taekwondo school or gave people the option to join my club to further their knowledge. My legacy at Broomfield High School will be left in the club I created that will be able to ensure the safety of women at Broomfield High School after I graduate.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

At my self-defense seminar in April, I had the Blue Bench come in and talk about setting boundaries (verbal and physical), listening to your instincts, common responses to sexual assault (fight, flight, freeze), how to support a survivor, statistics, and a success story. I integrated parts of ATA martial arts Krav Maga training, self-defense I learn in class on a daily basis, and tips and tricks I think important into my curriculum.

What did you learn about yourself?

I love teaching. It is the greatest feeling watching people’s knowledge grow when they have an “ah-ha” moment while I am teaching something to them and to know that I have made an impact in their lives, something they can utilize later in their lives.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

It has given me skills I will be able to utilize in the future. I learned how to effectively communicate, bring a diverse team together to achieve a goal, utilize social media to reach the masses, organize, plan, and host a large event, manage money, lead, improvise with what I am given, and much more that now just seems natural to me. This directly helped me with the creation of another club at my school in which I had to go through all the same steps I did with the creation of my Women’s Self-Defense club; this time, of course, it was much smoother and I could tell my leadership was much more natural.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

It allowed me to grow in ways that can’t be taught and that can’t be seen until reflection is done. I was able to execute a project that made a difference in my community addressing a topic that was important to me and doing it in a way that utilized talents I already had and formed new ones. I was able to see all of the things I had learned in Girl Scouts come together giving me the tools I needed to accomplish my Gold Award. I was able to see the impact that Girl Scouts had on my life that I never realized.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award recipient partners with local restaurant

Submitted by Sarah Greichen

Metro Denver

Centennial

On Friday, November 11, 2016,  join Girl Scout Gold Award Recipient Sarah Greichen at Snooze at The Streets of SouthGlenn to celebrate Score A Friend as Snooze’s new Community Partner!

Sarah started the nonprofit organization, Score A Friend, to promote and support youth to lead school-based unified clubs for students of all abilities to build inclusion. Today, there are Score A Friend Clubs in schools and universities across the country. Snooze recently invited Score A Friend, Inc. to become their new community partner.

The mission of Score A Friend is to promote and support youth to lead school-based Unified Clubs for students of all abilities; connecting schools with community providers and resources; and creating access and opportunities for Unified Friendships, inclusive sports and clubs, parent-to-parent connections, and the education and activation of youth leaders to build inclusion in the world.

November 11 is the sixth anniversary of Snooze at SouthGlen.  Snooze is celebrating the day by introducing their new partner to the community. Snooze will donate a portion of their proceeds of the day to Score A Friend, Inc.  Sarah and other board members will be there to meet and greet and share Score A Friend information and merchandise.  Come to Snooze, meet Sarah, and support the new Snooze/Score A Friend partnership!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

 

Girl Scout Day of Dance with the Colorado Ballet

Join us for our annual Girl Scout Day of Dance at Colorado Ballet, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2016. Girl Scouts will experience three different dance genres throughout the day: square dancing, ballet, and creative dance at the Colorado Ballet’s studio in Denver. Dancers will be exposed to the specific techniques as well as improvisation and dance concepts. A new activity this year is a tour of Colorado Ballet’s fun costume closet.

Girl Scouts of all ages are invited. The Day of Dance is great activity for Brownies to earn requirements towards their Dancer Badge. The girls will learn about stretching, getting ready to dance, trying different dances, and how to create their own dance through the Creative Dance session which relate directly to badge requirements.

Cost is $12/girl and Girl Scouts can register here: https://goo.gl/nyO6W2.

Registration deadline is Nov. 4. Questions? Please contact Brandy Schauppner at swbrandy@q.com.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Emma Albertoni, Arvada, “Down with Dough”

 

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What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My project addressed financial literacy education in schools. As I was preparing to buy a car, and beginning to look at tuition costs and student loans for college, I realized that I didn’t really know much about financial literacy. The current financial literacy curriculum that is taught in public schools in Colorado is limited and woven into other subjects, not giving the students the connection financial literacy has to their life outside of school. Students leaving high school are dealing with bigger amounts of money, no matter if they go to college or not. They’re buying cars, renting apartments, dealing with student loans, and budgets. My goal was to make financial literacy more easily accessed by students by requiring a class in Jefferson County School District High Schools, so the students would directly learn the financial concepts and tools they would need post high school. I began by writing a unit that was implemented in my own high school’s Family Consumer Science class. I then proposed to the Jefferson County School Board for a required Financial Literacy class. I also met with state legislators to discuss how we can work together to improve financial literacy guidelines from a legislative direction.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

In my high school Family Consumer Sciences class, I researched and created a unit on Financial Safety Online. That unit consisted of power points, activities, videos, and discussions. I assigned both pre and post unit quizzes to the students to see their improvement through direct teaching of these financial concepts. Their average class grade increased from a “C” to an “A” demonstrating that direct education of financial literacy topics is effective. Feedback both on Down with Dough Facebook page as well as numerous comments after my 9News segment show that this topic is relatable to many people and they were all encouraging me on this subject. Many aspects of my Gold project are still in process such as the legislative work and what the School Board Curriculum Department will develop over time. I was very happy to get people to see the gap in this important curriculum piece and be willing to look more deeply into it, and take appropriate action.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My unit will be sustained by the Family Consumer Sciences teacher at Ralston Valley who has signed a letter of commitment to continue to teach the unit I created. The Jefferson County School Board is looking for ways to fill the gap between the current curriculums by connecting it to the students’ lives and experiences. I am also working with a Colorado State Legislator, Lang Sias, who is looking to assist with legislative options to provide guidelines for state educators to follow in teaching financial literacy. My brother and I are also starting a non-profit (Down with Dough) to keep the discussion on my issue going, as well as educate students and young adults on financial literacy subjects. We will also work with people, like Representative Sias, to develop a financial literacy event to be held at the Capitol and work to mend the issue in the future. Down With Dough will be effective January 1, 2017.

Locally interest was generated (and maintained) by news media including an article in my school newspaper, my local paper, a segment on 9News and my Facebook page “Down with Dough.”

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Financial literacy affects everyone worldwide. I researched how Colorado compares to other states and how the United States compares to other countries as far as the education of Financial Literacy topics. Nationally, Champlain College’s Center of Financial Literacy graded each state based on their financial literacy requirements. Colorado earned a ‘C’, as financial topics are woven into curriculums, but it isn’t taught directly. Globally, the Program for International Student Assessment submitted a test to 15-year-olds from different countries to test their financial education. The U.S. scores in the bottom 50% of other countries with countries such as China, Australia and the Czech Republic scoring higher.

What did you learn about yourself?

There are several key things that I learned about myself. First, is that I can achieve my goals despite road blocks as long as I don’t give up. It is okay to have to rethink problems and brainstorm alternative solutions. Sticking with something can have huge payoffs in the end. I also learned key things such as prioritizing, organization, and business communications. Probably the most important thing I learned is how to make sure the people who are helping me (my volunteers) know how much I appreciate them and the work they do for me. It is easy to go along and get busy with timelines and projects and assume that people know that you appreciate them but the reality is that you have to make sure you tell them how appreciative you are. If they don’t know that you are grateful for their help, they won’t want to continue helping you. It is very important to make sure they know you need them.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning the Gold Award has shown me I can do anything if I persevere. I will take the memories and skills that I have learned and apply them to everything I will do going forward. I am a stronger, more confident person because of this project.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award to me is the ultimate culmination of everything that I’ve learned over the 12 years that I’ve been a Girl Scout. Service to others, courage to take risks, and a safe and supportive environment to try new things. It is the highest award and is a great way to end my career as a Girl Scout.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

 

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kelsey Collins, Aurora, “Colorado History and Park Safety”

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What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

For my project I created my own curriculum to teach preschool and elementary school children about park safety and Colorado history. I worked alongside the Ecopark in southeast Aurora to develop ideas and determine important information to include, such as flood safety. I taught at a couple schools and at a Brownie Field Day to share my information.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

To measure the impact of my project, I created a trivia game to play with the kids that I taught. I had questions ranging from what were the Indian tribes in Colorado to the proper steps to take if there is a storm forming while you are at a park to judge if the kids had learned any of the information.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

The Centennial Youth Corp will be helping take over my project to make it sustainable. I shared all of my materials with this group of high school students so that they will be able to teach kids together and set up booths at city events to share the information I have created.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I shared my materials with parks across the state and nation so that they can provide these activities and coloring sheets in their information centers. I even contacted the Yellowstone Board of Education and my materials are currently under review there.

What did you learn about yourself?

I am very capable of being a leader, as everyone is, when it comes to doing something that you are passionate about. I realized that I am quite capable of procrastination, but when there is a will there is always a way to finish the project. I can accomplish anything I set my mind to.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I think this award helped me establish my own leadership skills that I will carry into the future. After doing this 80 hour project with some help from my family and friends I realized that there are always people I can count on to help me through the more difficult aspects of my life, but that I am also able to do anything I want to with my life.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience? 

The Gold Award is a good culmination of the whole Girl Scout experience. By completing this project, I feel like I have followed through and completed the mission of Girl Scouts. It established a lot of leadership skills and reliability in me, and I am glad to say that I have earned the highest honor in this organization.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Winning the Recycled Art Challenge Scout Night at Denver Zoo

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Submitted by Ana Lucia Martin del Campo

Metro Denver

Thornton

On October 1, 2016, at the event “Scouts at the Denver Zoo,” the Denver Zoo offer in celebration of the temporary exhibit Washed Ashore, Art to Save the Sea, Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts will get a chance to create their own works of art at home and bring them to the event to display in our very own Scout Night art gallery. Scouts will vote on their favorite sculpture and the winner will win a Bunk with the Beasts overnight adventure! Let your creativity run wild!

Congratulations to Girl Scouts from Troop 62511 Brownie Justine, Brownie Alison, and Daisy Ivana for win first place with your Turtle!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Baily Holsinger, Larkspur, “Beanies for Babies”

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What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I not only crocheted beanies for newborn babies at Denver Health Medical Center and Baby Haven in Ft. Collins, I also held a number classes to teach people of all ages how to make the beanies.  During my classes, I also educated the students on the importance of covering a baby’s head as they lose heat quickly and the need for newborn baby items as many families struggle financially. I also shared how to make the beanies and ways to support these agencies on social media and with fliers in multiple areas trying to reach as many people as I can.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured impact of my project by how fast the beanies were delivered to families in need and how many more beanies Denver Health and Baby Haven needed.

How is your project sustainable? How  will  your  project  continue to impact after your  involvement?

First of all, my project will be sustained by those I taught. Each group was left with instructions as well as contact information for Denver Health and Baby Haven. The Denver Health staff will also be continuing my project  and reaching out to other hospitals in Denver who would be interested in a supply of beanies to give to families of newborn babies.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have a Facebook page open to anyone and it has directions to make a beanie, directions on how to get started on holding a “Beanies for Babies” class, and suggestions on where they can deliver beanies.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I am a good teacher and when I need to I can take charge and be a leader. I am a less shy of a person than I thought.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award made me a better leader and more aware of the needs in my community. This project will impact my future because I know that I will be able to be a leader in any situation and that I can lead people of all ages. I know I have the skills to continue to help my community and educate people about community needs and what they can do to make someone’s life better.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award project was very important to me because all my life I was a shy girl and this project helped me come out of my shell and be a leader. This project was the first major project that I have done from start to finish. Now I know that I am able to compete things that I set my mind to.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Power!

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Submitted by Kristin Coulter

Metro Denver

Denver

Most crimes are committed by males, Denver Police Department Officer Sharon Avendaño, explained last week to Park Hill 8th and 9th grade Senior Girl Scouts. And while the Denver Police Department is only approximately 10% female, women are an important to the force. She told the girls that female police officers, just by virtue of being female, often have greater power to defuse potentially volatile situations between the police and citizens. In her experience, when testosterone levels are extremely high, intense situations can quickly deteriorate. However when a female police officer is involved, often a citizen’s anger can be diffused and you can hear a few “yes mam’s.” In fact this Denver native and former Girl Scout Brownie has been on the force for 20 years and has never had to use her gun or a Taser.

Girl Scout Troop 3573 invited, District 2 Community Resource Officer Avendaño to their troop meeting October 13th to learn about law enforcement in general and as a potential career. The teenage scouts also learned about the Cadet Program. The Cadet Program allows high school graduates interested in a career in public safety (police officer, firefighter or deputy sheriff) a part-time job and tuition at either Metro State University of Denver or the University of Colorado Denver. After a lively chat about her adventures on the force Officer Avendaño told the girls to study hard in school so that all career options are open to them.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Meet Moscow Ballet’s Olena Nalyvaiko

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Submitted by Bobbie Fachini

Metro Denver

Denver

Moscow Ballet will return to Denver’s Paramount Theatre on December 9 and 10, 2016 with three performances of its acclaimed Great Russian Nutcracker. Girl Scouts are invited to attend at discounted rates, and receive a free, fun patch with purchase of ticket. For a group of 25 or more (including chaperones, friends, and siblings), there will be a meet-and-greet with one of the dancers.

I’m Bobbie Fachini, Market Manager for Moscow Ballet’s North American tours. I had the chance to talk to Audition Director, Olena Nalyvaiko, about her life as an international dance professional and about her time here in the United States. To prepare for the tour, she will be in Denver for a few days working with Cherry Creek Dance. She will be rehearsing students at Cherry Creek who will have the chance to dance on stage with Moscow Ballet in ancillary roles.

BF: When did you start dancing?

ON: I was 3-years-old, but I really understood that I wanted to dance professionally when I was 11. My parents had me choose between studying language to be a professional interpreter or training to be a professional ballerina.

BF: Do you like to travel? Why or why not?

ON: When you travel you always have new emotions and excitement. If you travel a lot it becomes exhausting, but no matter what it is worth it. Wise people will tell you that you won’t remember the things you’ve bought, but you will always remember the emotions you get from traveling. I absolutely agree with these words. Every new city is like a small new world that you can discover.

BF: What are your favorite cities in the world?

ON: Besides the USA, I love my native city of Kiev. It is very ancient and beautiful. Berlin, Dublin, and Vancouver, too.

BF: And in the United States?

ON: I have a bunch of favorite cities in the USA: Chicago, San Francisco, Washington DC, and Denver. 

I visited Denver last year. It has a beautiful and interesting downtown, amazing nature, nice weather. The city is very alive. I like the state of Colorado. The mountains are breathtaking. And I enjoy working with our host studio in Denver: Cherry Creek Dance. The teachers are doing brilliant work and the kids are always prepared 100%. It is one of the best studios I have worked with during my time as Audition Director.

BF: What is your favorite thing about dancing?

ON: My favorite thing about dancing is that I can improve myself each day. My body is my working instrument. I can travel and see the world and meet different people. I enjoy being on stage and all of the stage things: play different roles, put on make-up and costumes, backdrops and props, and even our daily routine (taking class, stretching, rehearsing).

BF: Do you have advice for children who want to dance professionally?

ON: Always try to catch the best from each teacher. All of them can teach you something useful and important. Nowadays a dancer should be well-rounded and developed, so study all styles including contemporary, jazz, and ballet. 
Enjoy what you are doing and practice, practice, practice.

Learn more about Olena here: 
http://www.nutcracker.com/youth-auditions/meet-audition-directors/olena-nalyvaiko

Troops can sign up for Girl Scout tickets here:
 http://www.nutcracker.com/buy-tickets/girl-scout-groups

Girl Scouts Honors 2016 Women of Distinction

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Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, Girl Scouts of Colorado honored the 2016 Women of Distinction during the Thin Mint Dinner at the Denver Marriott Tech Center. The 2016 Women of Distinction for the Denver metro-area are:

  • Rose Andom, President and CEO Rosmik, Inc. and Chair, The Rose Andom Charitable Foundation
  • Nikki Cady, Founder, Heart and Hand Center for Youth and Families
  • Stephanie Donner, Chief Legal and People Officer, Galvanize
  • Kim Easton, CEO, Urban Peak
  • Jena Hausmann, President and CEO, Children’s Hospital Colorado
  • Gloria Higgins, President, Executives Partnering to Invest in Children (EPIC)
  • Brook Kramer, Vice President and Relationship Manager, First Western Trust
  • Christine Marquez-Hudson, President and CEO, The Denver Foundation
  • Mary Noonan, Board Trustee, Delta Dental of Colorado, Delta Dental of Colorado Foundation and the Center for Women’s Health Research at CU Anschutz Medical Campus
  • Cheryl Ruiz-Lucero, Director, Capital Campaigns and Major Gifts, Denver Health Foundation

 

A group of nearly 500 gathered at the event, which was chaired by Women of Distinction Jandel Allen-Davis, VP Kaiser Permanente Colorado Region, and Kristin Richardson, Philanthropist and Community Volunteer. The honorees were selected by a committee of their peers led by Selection Chair Gin Butler, Woman of Distinction ‘03. They are shining examples of corporate, civic and philanthropic leadership and serve as role models for our female leaders of tomorrow.

The evening’s keynote speaker was Girl Scout Gold Award recipient Sarah Greichen, Girl Scouts of the USA National Young Woman of Distinction and recipient of Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence.

Since 1997 Girl Scouts of Colorado has recognized 426 Denver-area women with this honor. More than $2 million has been raised in 19 years by Women of Distinction for Girl Scout programs.

Silver Presenting Sponsors include Lockheed Martin and Kristin Richardson. The Bronze Presenting Sponsor was Colorado Business Bank.

For more information on the Girl Scouts Women of Distinction program, visit our website.

To see photos from the event, go to our Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/gscolorado/sets/72157675319733466