Tag Archives: Metro Denver

Girl Scouts wrangle audience at Buffalo Bill Days Parade in Golden

Submitted by Sarah Scalise, GSCO Recruitment Specialist

Metro Denver

Golden

Troops from Golden gathered July 29, 2017 for the Buffalo Bill Days Parade, an tradition for more than 50 years! “100 Years of Golden,” the Girl Scouts of Colorado Centennial, and the 100 year anniversary of the Girl Scout Cookie Sale Program made for 300 years of celebration! We chose to mark the occasion by wearing historical and modern Girl Scout uniforms to show where we’ve been and where we are going. In addition to having a fun time, our group received a shout-out from the emcee for “most well-written description of your parade entry!” Thank you to our awesome Girl Scouts, volunteers, and behind-the-scenes support for putting together this opportunity.

If you and your Girl Scout troop want to wear historical uniforms in a parade, it’s not too late! We are looking for girls and adults to march in the Strasburg Hometown Days Parade on August 12 at 8:30 a.m. Girl Scouts will commemorate the joining of the first continuous railroad in the United States. Please sign up no later than Monday August 6 at noon. http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d45aaac22abfe3-strasburg

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Makala Roggenkamp, Arvada, “The Need to Read”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I worked with Hope House to target lower literacy levels found in teen mothers and their children. I created book templates for each child to bring home so that they feel more comfortable in class and to promote the joy of reading. I also installed a Free Little Library at Hope House’s new location to make books easily accessible.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

My impact will be noticed as the children become more excited to go to class and the mothers begin to feel more comfortable leaving their kids in the daycare. I also hope to see the children have more of a desire to interact with books and learn to love reading. One night I was at Hope House in the daycare, there was a little boy who was in tears when his mom left, so my volunteer and I showed him the book, some extra paper, and crayons and he was back to normal in seconds. It turned out that he loved coloring and he spent the whole night at the table working on his book.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

My project will be sustained beyond my involvement by a few different people. I had 70 copies of the books printed (50 toddler & 20 infant) and gave them to Hope House so they can start this project with my assistance. Hope House has been given the template for the books with instructions. They have a printer and plan on continuing to print books as needed and work on the books with new children that come to Hope House. My Free Little Library is meant to be self-sustainable, but that is not something that I am going to ask of low income mothers. Instead, I have partnered with the 8th grade girls Bible class at Faith Christian Middle School and their teacher. They do fundraising for Hope House every year and then visit the home to see the campus and learn about their programs. Along with that work, they will be adding a book drive and Library upkeep so that the house will not be left empty or with rundown books. I completed the first book drive this year and it ran for a week. I made postcards to address the mission of the book drive and hand out during my presentation of my Gold Award project to my Bible class. As a result, I collected 206 adult and children’s books for the Little Library. I involved classmates and teachers in the drive and was able to share more about what Hope House does and how they can be involved. The extra books will be given to Hope House to either restock between upkeep visits or to use with their own discretion.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

To create a national and/or global link for my project, I created a blog. Lauren Hasz helped me to create a blog and make posts. I have discussed my journey with Girl Scouts and Hope House in this project with all the ups and downs, so younger girls reading it may take away something to help them with their future Gold projects. My blog is hopehousegoldproject.wordpress.com and I plan on keeping it updated even after my project is over. I have shared my blog on multiple social media sites and had my friends and family shared it so that I can get more views. I have shared it with my team members, Hope House, my old Girl Scout troop in Maryland, and Step by Step. Hope House also has contacts with organizations like themselves around the country. So far, I have reached out to Step by Step in Seattle and I plan on talking to all of the connections Hope House has shared with me. Hope House has awarded me with “Volunteer of the Month” and they also are setting up a date to interview me for their blog. They have also shared my work on their Facebook page. I decided to purchase a book house with The Free Little Library that will require finishing construction. I made this decision based on the fact that once my library is installed it will be registered on their website. This means that it will be put on their map with a blurb about my location/project once Hope House is ready for instillation. This is a free service that can help me spread the word even further about my works.

What did you learn about yourself?

In this project, I really learned how to communicate. Having to involve so many people in the process at times was a pain, but I learned how to contact people that had skills that I needed, set up a coffee date, and come with an agenda so that I could use our time wisely. Having conversations on the phone has never been something that I have been awesome at, I’ve always opted for emails, but with this project I had to call many people and I had to learn how to become comfortable with that. I learned that I am a personable person and that I can adapt to different situations well. My experience with my first contact at Hope House going on maternity leave reinforced these skills. I’ve also had to learn how to recover from rejection which has opened my eyes to the fact that I am more resilient and stronger than I knew. It was a humbling experience to have your ideas turned down. It taught me to push through and keep my eye on my goals. Having to work with a team was a new challenge since I am usually one that likes to work on things alone. I do think it was definitely beneficial to have them helping me out and teaching me how to do new things.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award will impact my future because I will always be able to say that I accomplished my goal of completing it. I had so many bumps along the way that taught me how to deal with changes in plans. Knowing that I completed my project has boosted my self confidence in so many ways. It will also help me in the future with my communication skills. I hope to work in a field that involves a lot of vital communication and planning. Having completed this project, I can confidently say that those skills have grown exponentially.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been in Girl Scouts since I was five. I earned my Bronze and Silver Awards, so it felt natural to finish up strong. That wasn’t the easiest decision, but I have no regrets. It has helped to validate my being in Girl Scouts still. Most girls drop out after fourth grade, and at times I wondered what I was still doing here. But during my Gold process, I realized that my work in Girl Scouts was not finished yet and I still had an impact to be made.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me to become a go-getter. I have always been a very driven person, but I felt pretty beat down for the first half of my project. I was honestly ready to quit multiple times, but I realized that I needed to finish my work with Girl Scouts for more than just myself. I also had to learn perseverance and how to become a go-getter while working with Hope House. Trying to bring a big team into a small non-profit is impossible, but by working with Girl Scouts and Hope House, we found a way to make it work.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

A Girl Scout Memory for Edna “Skipper” Hollis

Submitted by Ann Thacker

Metro Denver

Lakewood

Remember the little women
in a one-room cabin
in winter
learning cooking
on a wood-burning stove?

Every morning
a sleepy Jill
would climb the hill
for buckets of well-water
to wash the fog
of dreaming
from her shining face —
And the days were full of discovery.

With ink of night
spilling across the sun,
the magic of snowdrift slides
and ice skates on the long black lake
grew dim
as tired giggling Girl Scouts
followed the reflections of stars
in the snowshoe paths toward home
to fall in a joyous heap
around the cabin fire.

Later, with the dishes clean
and bedrolls spread,
Skipper would lead them
in song
then soon to sleep
secure within the Sandman’s hand
and a scout leader’s love.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to celebrate the legacy of one of our most cherished alumnae, Edna “Skipper” Hollis. In 2016, Skipper passed away at the age of 104, leaving a 94-year history of Girl Scouting as a girl and an adult volunteer.  Skipper touched the lives of hundreds of girls, families, and volunteers and will be remembered for her love of the outdoors and the annual troop gathering she hosted at her Colorado cabin for more than six decades.

To make a gift in honor of Skipper, which will support opportunity grants to ensure any girl is able to attend camp, or  to honor an alum who has made a difference in your life, go to the Girl Scouts of Colorado website: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/support-us/alumnae.html 

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Days at Elitch Gardens: Patch contest winner

Congratulations to our Elitch Gardens Patch Contest Winner, Gianna G., from Aurora! Gianna’s design will be on our event patch that each participating Girl Scout will receive. Gianna also won two daily park passes, two VIP passes, and two special ride passes. A special thanks to Elitch Gardens for the generous prize pack for Gianna! We had 18 great entries, so thank you to everyone who participated.

Join us for our annual Girl Scout Days at Elitch Gardens! All Girl Scouts, friends, and families are invited.

Date: Friday, Aug.11 – Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017

Cost: $25.99/person. Tickets can be purchased here. A donation will be given back to GSCO for each ticket sold.

Not able to make it during the weekend? No problem! We have a great season-long deal offering a daily park ticket for $29.99/person that’s good through the end of October.

We hope to see you there!

Troop 60696 Silver Award Work

Submitted by Leona Lawless

Metro Denver

Westminster

Troop 60696 took a full year to complete their Silver Award.
They built bridges of kindness, service, and community by 12 random acts. They connected the random acts to the Girl Scout Law. They learned to face their fears. They learned to respect all people regardless of their circumstances or jobs. They made the world a better place and were a sister to every Girl Scout. They created a video entitled Silver Award Video Troop 60696. I am so proud of my girls and their hard work on The Silver Award!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Journey weekend Dec. 1 – 3, 2017: Looking for partners

Submitted by Rebecca Lankford

Metro Denver

Broomfield

Hello leaders and older girls!

Our troop of Cadettes and soon-to-be Seniors are planning a weekend at Tomahawk Ranch to work on a journey. We would love to partner with some other Cadette and Senior troops for the planning so that we can all be successful in completing a journey and meet some new scouting friends.

We have not selected the journey yet, but we do have three cabins reserved. You can make your own food or purchase the food at the camp. If you make your own food, you will need to bring your own gear, plates, etc.

The only fees would be to cover the cost of the cabin and your food (which you either bring or you purchase from GSCO). This is not a money-earning activity for our troop, just an opportunity for the troop to work with other girls.

Our troop will take up the better part of one cabin. We need to cancel the reservation for the other two cabins two-months in advance, so the deadline to commit will be October 1.

If you are interested in working with us on a journey please contact us at troop53572@gmail.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Daisy Troop treats Buddy Shelter with cookies

Submitted by Katie Hill

Metro Denver

Parker

Daisy Troop 65889 dropped cookies off with the Castle Rock Dumb Friends League Buddy Center. While there, we were able to take a tour and learn about all of the amazing efforts the DDFL does on a daily basis. The girls had a great time and the DDFL was delighted to get some summertime Girl Scout Cookies!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Colorado Girl Scouts receive “Princess Benedikte Award”

Submitted by Rae Ann Dougherty

Metro Denver

Denver

As Girl Scouts, we are members of a huge community of 10 million fellow Girl Guides and Girl Scouts from 146 different countries around the world as represented by the blue and gold pin we wear on our uniform.  Additionally our Girl Scout Law ends with … “be a sister to every Girl Scout.”  The magic of that international sisterhood of Girl Scouting is experienced by many, including the recipients of Girl Scout of Colorado’s “Look Wider” International Travel Scholarship, as well as the many individuals and troops across our state that travel to one of our many World Centers found across the globe.

Connecting and supporting this international sisterhood becomes a passion that once hooked, entices many to continue to advance the power of this spider web-like network.  As a result of the volunteer work and dedication of two of the Colorado’s Girl Scout volunteers, they were recently honored at an international Girl Scout meeting in London for their contributions.

Marlene Logan and Rae Ann Dougherty received World Association of Girl Scout and Girl Guides’ (WAGGGS) “Princess Benedikte Award” from the royal patron of the Olave Baden-Powell Society (OB-PS).

OB-PS is a global network of WAGGGS supporters, providing vital financial help to the international Girl Guiding and Girl Scouting Movement.  At its core, the OB-PS Society is designed to provide financial support to WAGGGS to ensure a steady stream of income which funds its work, projects, and programs. This is similar to Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Juliette Gordon Low Society. http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/support-us/planned-giving.html  (Both the Logan’s and Dougherty’s are members of GSCO’s Juliette Gordon Low Society.)

More than 1,300 individuals from 59 countries have chosen to invest in their commitment to girls’ and young women’s futures by supporting OB-PS and WAGGGS.  Each of these individuals believes WAGGGS and its work can change lives and influence the future for whole communities.

The honor was received recently at the annual meeting of the OB-PS meeting at Gilwell Park in London, England.  (Gilwell Park is famous throughout the world for its Scouting heritage, beautiful setting, and stunning range of activities.) Furthering the international sisterhood of WAGGGS, 150 representatives from all five regions of WAGGGS participated in this meeting.

This special recognition was presented to Rae Ann and Marlene by Her Royal Highness Princess Benedikte of Denmark.  Since its inception in 2006, less than 25 individuals worldwide have received this award.

Congratulations Rae Ann and Marlene!

Memories of Skipper and Troop 362

Submitted by Peg Goodwin Merrill

Metro Denver

Denver

When one enters their 70’s it is common to do a lot of reflecting back on the life you have lived thus far. For me the seven years I spent as part of Denver Troop 362 were definitely ones that taught me a lot and contributed to the woman I became. I was privileged to have had Edna “Skipper” Hollis as a troop leader during those years. As I prepare to come to Denver for her final “Scouts Own” I have been reflecting a lot about my experiences with that troop and the things I learned from Girl Scouting.

My love of the outdoors and camping began with our troop’s many trips to Lake Eldora. Winter or summer the lake called us. There wasn’t a ski area in the late fifties and early sixties, so we had to hike up the hill. I remember one time when we went winter camping and had to climb thru very deep drifts of snow. Our leader “Skipper” forged ahead and made a tow rope for us to pull ourselves up the mountain through the deep snow carrying our gear and sleeping bags. Once we reached the cabin, it was quite a task to get it warm, so we created a rotation system to take turns staying awake and feeding the fire all night. Most likely it was experiences like this in my youth that taught me perseverance.

Skipper was great at getting our mothers involved too, and many of them taught us a variety of merit badges, so there was always something to work on and no one was ever bored. Troop 362 was also where I learned to knit under the tutelage of Mrs. Crockett (whom we nicknamed “Davy”).

Perhaps, one of my fondest memories was the trip we took to Seattle, Washington for the World’s Fair in 1962. We spent a few years raising money for the trip by putting on plays, hosting spaghetti dinners, babysitting, etc. In addition to funds that the troop raised, each girl had to earn some of the money for the trip herself. So, we learned about planning, budgeting, and having a goal to look forward to. Our fathers even got involved and built large wooden boxes for each patrol to hold all of our cooking supplies. Each box was painted a different color. We chartered a big bus and camped out along the way, so again there was a lot of planning and preparing involved, as each patrol had to have all the food they needed to prepare meals.

That same summer I was fortunate enough to have been chosen as a delegate from Denver to the Girl Scout International Round-up in Button Bay, Vermont. It was Skipper’s encouragement that got me to apply – don’t think I would have had the courage to do that without her help. Going to Round-up was a wonderful experience and it saddens me that that opportunity no longer exists for girls today.
Another thing I learned in Scouting that I still use to this day is my love of music and all the songs we learned both at summer Girl Scout Camp and with my troop. Many of those songs I would sing to my children as lullabies, and just recently I was singing to a new grandbaby and my son came in and joined me in a duet singing “Mountains High” to his new baby, as he remembered me singing it to him.

Skipper also taught us about the stars and the wildflowers. She encouraged us all to earn the “Curved Bar” award, and many of us achieved this.

I am really looking forward to our annual troop reunion on July 29, 2017 and seeing old friends. It will be hard to say “good-bye” to Skipper, but I know her memory and the memories of Troop 362 will live on in each of us whose life she touched.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to celebrate the legacy of one of our most cherished alumnae, Edna “Skipper” Hollis. In 2016, Skipper passed away at the age of 104, leaving a 94-year history of Girl Scouting as a girl and an adult volunteer.  Skipper touched the lives of hundreds of girls, families, and volunteers and will be remembered for her love of the outdoors and the annual troop gathering she hosted at her Colorado cabin for more than six decades.

To make a gift in honor of Skipper, which will support opportunity grants to ensure any girl is able to attend camp, or  to honor an alum who has made a difference in your life, go to the Girl Scouts of Colorado website: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/support-us/alumnae.html 

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Buy, sell, or trade Girl Scout materials

Submitted by Tricia Pearson

Metro Denver

Arvada

Does your troop have extra patches, glue, string, or other supplies that you would like to sell or trade for new supplies for the upcoming year? Troop 66517 from Arvada is hosting an event on August 24, 2017 at Campbell Elementary School from 6:30 – 8 p.m. We will have ready made patch kits, as well as swap kits available for purchase. It is $2 to reserve your table space, so text Tricia at (720) 363-3377. Touring is free! This is open to all Girl Scouts and leaders.

Supply Swap Flyer

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.