Tag Archives: Metro Denver

Registration for Girl Scout camp opens TOMORROW

Whether you’re standing atop a mountain peak taking in the forever view, flying down the zipline with your heartbeat thumping in your ears, struggling to handle a squealing pig, or landing your arrow smack in the bullseye … Girl Scout Camp is a place where you can be YOU.

Registration for Girl Scout camp opens TOMORROW (Tuesday, January 13, 2015) at         9 a.m. on the Girl Scouts of Colorado website girlscoutsofcolorado.org/camp.  It’s going to be a great camping season! By popular demand, resident camp is back at Sky High Ranch. Amazing sessions are also planned at Tomahawk Ranch and awesome day, family, and troop camps are available across the state.

Need help picking the right session? Check out these recent interviews with Monica Gray, Tomahawk Ranch Camp Director:

Robbyn Hart of 850 KOA News Radio talks with the Girl Scouts

9News talks with Girl Scouts about camp registration

Here are a few “behind the scenes” pictures from the interview at 9News.

Girl Scout Camp is a no-judgment zone where you’ll reach new heights, push your limits and choose your fun with a group of girls who truly get you.  Our camp programs are open to all girls throughout Colorado, whether they’re in a troop or not, and new campers get a 10-percent discount. Pay by April 30th for the best prices!

Join GSCO for a winter open house

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Corporate Office  3801 E. Florida, Suite 720  Denver, CO 80210

4 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Girl Scout Shop 1485 S. Colorado Blvd., Suite 260  Denver, CO 80222

Stop by anytime throughout the day for in-person support for Camp registration & Cookie questions:

  • Regsitration for 2015 Summer camps opens at 9am on Tuesday, January 13, 2015.  Check out this summer’s sessions!  Talk to Outdoor Program staff about your camp questions.
  • Get help from Product Sales staff with cookie starting inventory and more!
  • Don’t miss cookie season!  Register your daughter as a Girl Scout.
  • History Committee archives display featuring camp & cookie memorabilia
  • Alumnae Meet Up 10 am-2pm – Tea & Girl Scout Cookie pairings

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Mattie McGarey, Louisville, “Love Every Inch”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I started a blog dedicated to aiding those recovering from eating disorders and the education of those who wanted to learn more about eating disorders. This lead to me giving a talk at Boulder High School’s body positive club about my project.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I decided to pursue this issue because I have seen eating disorders do terrible things to the lives of my friends. Adolescent girls heading to college are the most prone to developing eating disorders at such a stressful time in their lives and I thought that this project would be a great way to guide my peers into to this time of change. I am also a dancer and have seen eating disorders very present in the dance world, so I also wanted to explore and educate those who were close to me through dance about this issue.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

I was able to educate others on how to recognize signs of eating disorders as well as offer support and resources to those suffering from them.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I was able to gain skills and experience dealing with real world issues that I would not have been able to experience without completing the Gold Award. I not only learned leadership, planning, and goal setting skills, but I also learned interview techniques and how to network amongst a group of people who could help me in achieving my goals.

How did you make your project sustainable? 

The blog that I created, loveveryinch.weebly.com, will exist forever and the Boulder High Body Positive club that I spoke at remains active.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

Eating disorders are a widespread issue, not just in America, but around the world. Being able to start an open conversation about eating disorders in Boulder will hopefully lead to a more in-depth exploration of this issue in other places.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I think my most memorable experience was getting the chance to talk to a club of people my age who were dedicated to body positivity.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

Being able to have experience leading a project and completing one’s goals are important skills to have in one’s life. Besides developing communication and networking skills, I am able to have a piece of work proving that I am driven and hardworking when it comes to things I believe in.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I was able to take initiative of a project that I felt passionately about and I was able to take all of the leadership skills that I had learned throughout my time in Girl Scouts and apply them by myself.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Nina Asher, Greenwood Village, “Gates Summer Camp Hike”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Took inner-city Denver kids at the Boys and Girls Club on an education hike up near Boulder, CO.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I wanted to take the opportunity to make a positive impact on the kids at the Boys and Girls Club.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

I was able to teach the children about a topic they never would have learned about otherwise.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I became a better leader and more comfortable leading others. I was in charge of a group of counselors, who were older than I was, and I was forced to learn to interact and lead a group of people I was unfamiliar with leading.

How did you make your project sustainable?

I created a Hike Manual that will be passed down from summer to summer at the camp. It is for the counselors to use and teach from. Along with that, I created a Hike Activity Book for the campers to keep them engaged in what was being taught.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

Wherever these kids go in their life they always will keep the knowledge they learned at camp. This information will help them in many aspects including respecting nature and staying safe in circumstances of natural disasters common to Colorado.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

The most fond memory I have about my Gold Award project is working with the kids at Gates Camp and getting to interact and teach the children.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

This experience has taught me many things, but most importantly, about teaching children and what a difficult, but rewarding task that can be. In the future, I will keep the skills I learned from this project and apply them when I hopefully become a teacher.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award is a culmination of all my hard work over the years. Over everything I have learned when I was Brownie up to doing the actual project, everything I did lead up to my project and prepared me for that as well as for the rest of my life.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kirsten Brandes, Parker, “Beauty Is…”

Kirsten Brandes

Parker

Chaparral High School

“Beauty Is…”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I designed the curriculum for a series of workshops that fostered self-worth and self-esteem in teenage girls. I then presented the workshops to groups around the state.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I spent the last seven years attending, then aiding, and most recently instructing at Girl Scout water camps. I spent my summers surrounded by preteens in swim suits, and it’s never easier to read a girl’s insecurities in public than when she’s in a swimsuit. I watched confident, carefree 11-year-old girls become self-conscious at 13, and self-hating at 15-years-old. So, I decided to dedicate my project to teaching girls to be kind to themselves, that they are capable of so much more than being looked at.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?
It started girls on the long journey towards self-love, and gave them the tools to face down insecurity with optimism.

How did you make your project sustainable?

I had scouts volunteer to take over the presentation for older girls at future recruitment events and leadership workshops. I’ve trained them in how to run and present it, and will leave with them a condensed guide to the workshop.

What was your connection to the national or global community?
My project began in Parker, Colorado, with four high school freshman and me in my living room. At this first workshop, a family friend was impressed with the presentation and its message, asking me to present it again in Arvada, which I did two weeks later. At the Arvada presentation, a separate scout leader was present and she has asked if I could present it at statewide recruitment events. I have no doubt that, even without my direct involvement, the project will continue to grow, expanding its influence.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?
While I’ve never been one to shy away from crowds, I’ll be honest: I was nervous about presenting in front of teenage girls. I’d been a teenage girl; I know how they think, and more importantly, I have intimate knowledge of the year or so when they convince themselves it’s not cool to care, where insensitivity is synonymous with strength. But for my project to work, that barrier had to fall, and I found the easiest way to do that was to lead the way, and systematically deconstruct my own. Allowing them into my struggle with self-esteem and admitting my own insecurities was difficult, but effective. It created the necessary environment to address issues of such a personal nature. Leaders aren’t strong because they’re impervious, leaders are strong because they wear their insecurities like armor, acknowledging that it is not our faults that weaken us, but a failure to accept them and grow. I won’t soon forget that.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?
In the literal sense, the accomplishment of my Gold Award will allow me to enter the Air Force a rank higher, as an Airman, as opposed to the standard Airman Basic. Thanks Girl Scouts.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?
I feel as if I’ve achieved ultimate Girl Scout status, like the Gold Award is a cape tied around the neck of my scouting experience. And I spent so much time promising myself I was going to put on that cape someday, so to finally be able to feels absolutely super.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scouts offers fun for the entire family this winter

Submitted by Cortney Kern

Looking for great family events this winter?

Join us at the Pepsi Center in January and February to cheer on the Colorado Avalanche and Denver Nuggets with special Girl Scout activities and ticket prices.  January 4 from    6-9 p.m., the Avalanche will face off against the Columbus Blue Jackets. Before the game, Girl Scouts and their families can participate in a skating clinic with the talented Ice Girls. After the game, you can take pictures and play on the ice. All ticket holders enter into a drawing at random to get to watch the Avalanche players warm up from the Penalty Box.

If your family likes basketball, you will not want to miss the Denver Nuggets match-up against the Utah Jazz on Friday, February 27. Not only will girls get to watch the game, they get to sleep over with their families at the Pepsi Center, watch a movie on the jump Pepsi Vision screen, and enjoy a midnight snack and breakfast. There are two level ticket prices for this event. You can sit at the upper level for $22 or get up close at the lower level for $64.

The top three Girl Scout troops who sell the most tickets to the Nuggets game will get a very special opportunity to have a cookie booth after the game where you will get great visibility and an opportunity to make sales. The two troop runner-ups will get to present the colors during the National Anthem.

These two events make for a great family friendly evening.  A portion of tickets sold for both events goes to help provide more girls the Girl Scout Leadership Experience.

To get tickets to the Avalanche game, click here. For questions, contact Kiley Long at   (303) 405-7625.

To get tickets to the Nuggets game, use this link:

http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/activities?find=1&filter-month=&filter-year=&filter-date_start=&filter-date_end=&filter-format=grid&filter-zip=&filter-distance=&options%5B%5D=&filter-keywords=nuggets&types%5B2%5D=2&types%5B6%5D=6&types%5B7%5D=7&types%5B3%5D=3&types%5B4%5D=4&types%5B5%5D=5&types%5B1%5D=1&types%5B8%5D=8

For questions, contact Abby Stewart at (303) 405-1139.

 

If sports aren’t your favorite, the Denver Art Museum will have free admission for all kids under 18 during winter break. The museum will have activities, art making stations and theatrical performances throughout the December 20th to January 4th.

Troop creates music video about Girl Scout camp

Submitted by Troop 2851

Parker

Our Cadette troop got to experience Tomahawk Ranch in a whole new way.  The campgrounds became the set of our music video, featuring Troop 2851. We rewrote the lyrics to Miley Cyrus’ song “Party in the USA.” We knew it was a catchy song, and wanted to create a better influence for girls. It was our way of sharing our experiences’ in Girl Scouts.

We recorded the video when we were at Tomahawk Ranch. Most of the video takes place at our cabin. We had a lot of fun recording it, but that was just the beginning. At our next several Girl Scout meetings we went through the process of editing. We learned how to cut the video, add our voice over and background music, move slides around and create credits. It was a lot of hard work but we learned to persevere.

We hope you enjoy it.

Lone Tree Brownies fulfill teachers’ wish lists

School Supplies1 School Supplies2

Submitted by Tiffany Baker, (Co-Leader)  Girl Scout Troops 59 & 1226

Lone Tree

When our Brownie Girl Scouts asked us leaders to have more hands on learning experiences and less sit down discussions, we thought, “How could we make the Brownie Money Manager Badge more interactive?”

Badge requirement ideas included asking the girls to pretend to shop at a supermarket for groceries, an outfit, school supplies, and entertainment with friends all on a budget.

Each of the girls spoke with their teachers about what supplies were still needed in their classrooms. In true Brownie Spirit, the girls worked at home to earn classroom supply funds from their parents with agreed upon chores. Some items were donated by businesses.

We decided to meet up at WalMart, which has all the departments we needed.  The Brownies did a scavenger hunt in the Grocery and Clothes departments with a set budget, calculators, and lists of items they needed to find.  Then, they took their teachers’ classroom supply wish lists and worked together as a team to purchase all of the items on the lists for under their $100 combined troop budgets.  But, the learning didn’t stop there! Afterwards, the girls ordered and purchased their own snacks using cash at the in-store McDonalds with their Girl Scout sisters.

The girls learned a simple way they could say thank you to their teachers and work as a team to stay within their budgets.

Brownies help make 2,000 sandwiches for Denver Homeless Community

Submitted by Tiffany Baker, Co-Leader of Girl Scout Troops 59 & 1226

Lone Tree

Looking for a messy and fun service project to help the homeless?  Consider The Denver Peanut Butter Plan!  This organization meets once a month to make as many peanut butter sandwiches as they can.  Young kids can help make the sandwiches for 2 hours in the morning. Adult volunteers distribute the sandwiches in the afternoon.

Our Brownie Girl Scouts chose to work on a Lunches with Love service project this October.  They learned how to work on an assembly line team and that kids can chip in too to help feed others in need.

Each Peanut Butter Plan participant is asked to donate one jar of peanut butter and one jar of jelly, plus 2 or more loaves of bread.  This organization can also use sandwich size Ziploc baggies.  Volunteers are welcome to stay for the fun or just drop off donations.  Other donation ideas to consider would be toiletry kits (deodorant, tooth brushes, etc.), first aid kits or Adult Size t-shirts.  These items are welcome for distribution, anytime!

These troops have a goal of completing one or two service projects a month during the school year.  Next up: Collecting classroom school supplies for their teachers’ wish lists.

Girl Scouts announces 2013 Denver metro-area Women of Distinction

2012_WOD_Logo_print

Girl Scouts of Colorado is announcing the 2013 inductees into the esteemed Women of Distinction program in the Denver metro-area at a private reception on June 4 at the home of 2002 Woman of Distinction and 2013 Thin Mint Dinner co-chair Elaine Gantz Berman (photos from the June 4th event). This year’s eight Denver metro-area honorees were selected by a committee of their peers led by Selection Chair Dr. Jandel Allen-Davis, Vice President of Government and External Relations at Kaiser Permanente Colorado and 2012 Woman of Distinction, and chosen based on their contributions to the community, both professionally and personally. The Women of Distinction commit to supporting Girl Scouts of Colorado and serving Girl Scouts today.

The Women of Distinction program began in the Denver area in 1997. Including this year’s honorees, Girl Scouts of Colorado has recognized 395 women with this honor. The Women of Distinction is widely regarded as one of Denver’s premier philanthropic programs, bringing together a group of women dedicated to raising funds to support Girl Scout leadership programs. More than $2 million has been raised in 16 years.

Later this year, Girl Scouts of Colorado will publicly honor these inductees at the 2013 Thin Mint Dinner in Denver. This event will be from 5:30-8:30 p.m. on Oct. 10 at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel and will once again spotlight Girl Scouts’ Live Healthy, Lead Healthy initiative, focusing on self-esteem, good nutrition and exercise. Paula Herzmark, Executive Director of the Denver Health Foundation and 2002 Woman of Distinction, and Elaine Gantz Berman, Colorado State Board of Education and 2002 Woman of Distinction, are event co-chairs.

For more information on the Oct. 10 event, including how you can help, please contact Amy Myers at 303-607-4896 or amy.myers@gscolorado.org. You can also visit our website for more information or to purchase tickets and/or sponsorships at girlscoutsofcolorado.org/women-of-distinction-denver.

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Denver metro-area 2013 Women of Distinction: 

  • Denise Burgess, President/General Manager, Burgess Services, Inc.
  • Michelle M. Lucero, Esq., Chief Legal Officer, Children’s Hospital Colorado
  • Karen Nakandakare, Diversity, Inclusion & Community Investment, CH2M HILL
  • Kristin Richardson, Community Volunteer, Smithsonian National Board, Smithsonian Science Education Board, Children’s Hospital Colorado & Foundation Boards, TBD Colorado Board
  • Christine M. Riordan, Ph.D., Former Dean, Daniels College of Business, University of Denver, Provost, University of Kentucky 
  • Mimi Roberson, President/CEO, Presbyterian/St. Luke’s Medical Center & Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children at P/SL
  • Regina M. Rodriguez, Partner, Faegre Baker Daniels LLP
  • Shari F. Shink, Esq., Founder/President Emeritus, Rocky Mountain Children’s Law Center

Media coverage of announcement: Denver Business Journal