Tag Archives: Metro Denver

GSCO Photo Challenge: Daisy fun in the creek

Submitted by Amber Biviano

Metro Denver

Parker

Our Daisies (Troop 65878) was trying to complete all of the petals before summer travels last year. We had four left at the end of school, so we decided to hold a workshop to complete them. One of our troop leaders hosted at her home, which also included walking to Cherry Creek nearby. The girls enjoyed working on activities in the open space and exploring the creek!

Petals earned:

  1. Respect myself and others
  2. Respect authority
  3. Be a sister to every Girl Scout
  4. Use resources wisely

Girl Scouts of Colorado is hosting a photo challenge! Just submit your favorite Girl Scout photo and the story behind it using the Share Your Stories form (www.gscoblog.org/share). Winners will be featured in future GSCO marketing materials, on GSCO’s social media networks, and on the GSCO Blog.

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Lisa Ali

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Lisa Ali of Denver in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO askedLisa to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I always wanted to be a Girl Scout. Unfortunately, I didn’t get the chance growing up as there was not enough volunteers in our neighborhood. I remember thinking as a little girl that I sure wished I could be a Girl Scout and wear an amazing Brownie uniform and go camping with all my girlfriends. I remember thinking that if I ever had a daughter, I would be a leader, so that she would get the chance to dawn the Brownie cap. I didn’t want her to miss out on becoming the best little human she could be and the experiences she would have with her Girl Scout friends would be priceless. So, when my daughter smiled up at me one day and shared that she wanted to be a Girl Scout, (she had a flyer in her Thursday folder from school) I looked into it. There were NO open troops of Daisies in our area. Initially, I felt defeated until council introduced Tiffany Stone to me and we met for coffee one afternoon and the rest is history. Our troop was established and the Daisies who began with the troop are still together as second year Juniors and first year Cadettes.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I was terrified to be a Girl Scout leader as I seriously had NO clue on how to run a Girl Scout troop. I was at a loss and I tell you thank goodness for my co-leader as she is creative, motivated, and AMAZING. So amazing that since she runs the Urban Trails Service Unit I had to throw my hat in the ring and I have been the service unit cookie manager finishing my fourth year.  So, I am a Girl Scout mom, leader, and SUCM. I just love the volunteers in Urban Trails as they are an amazing group of people who make having the roles I play worth every moment. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Well, as a volunteer I have learned a variety of things about myself, my daughter, engaging parents, and team work. Being a leader is a lot of work. Helping the girls learn how to be the best humans they can be through kindness, empathy, diversity, and respecting themselves and showing respect to others has been an amazing challenge. It was like herding cats when they were Daisies, all that energy and sparkle it was almost impossible to contain. When they became Brownies and they started to take an active interested in “being girl led,” it was challenging to let them have more of the control and creativity, as they continued to explore who they are as individuals and as a troop. I learned what the term “safe failures” means and how it helps our girls become confident and self sufficient. Teaching them to stand up for themselves and others in a way that is kind and assertive has been such an area of growth.  Watching them support one another as they take on life challenges or they see a fellow Girl Scout sister emotionally hurting and supporting them without prompts, was the most amazing reward for me to experience. I think in regards to what I have learned about being a Girl Scout volunteer regarding my troop has been the girls learning that they don’t always win, an that is okay, taking a loss or a failure for a learning experience and trying harder the next time has been breath taking.  Our girls have always been go-getters, innovators, risk -takers, and are becoming leaders. From the very inception of our troop, we have always had the expectations the girls would give back to their community as part of their yearly activities. Every year they have picked a give back project and paid for it through some of the earnings from the Fall Product or Girl Scout Cookie programs.  Our girls have given cookies and suitcases to kids in foster care, so that they don’t have to move from home to home with their belongings in a plastic bags. They have built and painted a little library for the community where their meetings are held and created a community garden amongst other things.  It has been a joy to watch them grow, not only physically but emotionally and mentally. I know I rambled as I began to write my thoughts got a way from me. I have learned that it takes a village to have an amazing troop. We have that, between the leaders, the girls and the parents and all the support they give our troop is able to thrive. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope they have learned to believe in themselves, that making mistakes is just fine, being a team is empowering, and that being accountable for your actions is key to growth as a beautiful human. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Well, this is a loaded question. I am a Puerto Rican, African American, Caucasian adopted woman who struggles with dyslexia and ADHD.  I don’t like being in the spotlight as all my life I have struggled with finding my place of belonging and believing in myself.  You know self esteem issues and all that.  Being an adopted bi-racial person, I was always the square peg that just didn’t quite fit. I wanted something different for my daughter, I wanted her to have a sense of belonging from a very young age. So, I knew that I wanted to create a troop that is diverse in all ways possible. I wanted to have a place where all girls regardless of their ethnic background, socio economic situation, family dynamics, cultural experience, or learning style had a place to feel accepted for who they are as they are. I wanted to create a troop where all girls had a sense of belonging and sisterhood was true.  Becoming a Girl Scout volunteer, I knew as a brand-new troop leader that I was going to make mistakes, grow from them, and become a better person. Definitely not without hard work and some bumps along the way. I believe that I have become a go-getter by exceeding my boundaries and challenging myself to step out of my comfort zone. Hiking in the woods, sleeping in uncomfortable places, and walking in the dark with the fear of bears are just a few of the obstacles I have overcome.  Not to mention placing myself in a role where others depend on me as the person who can support and help them have a successful cookie season.  Managing all the ins and outs of being a SUCM in an organized fashion takes patiences, innovation, and leadership.  The challenge of my dyslexia and ADHD has always been so difficult growing up and not wanting others to see me as flawed I always seemed to shy away from leadership roles which would have me standing out in the crowd. I was much more of a blend into the shadows type of person. I now understand ADHD and dyslexia are part of who I am and that being a risk-taker, go-getter, and innovator has made me a great leader therefore helping me to embrace ALL that I am. I am grateful for the parents in our troop, the girls and especially my co-leader because without all these individuals I may still have been someone who was okay with staying in the shadows.  Volunteering has helped me grow, heal and accept me for me and I now know I am enough.  

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Power of Cookie: High flying Troop 61684

Submitted by Renee Valtakis

Metro Denver

Englewood

Cadette Troop 61684 celebrated their successful cookie season by going indoor skydiving at iFly Denver! The Girl Scouts wanted to do something daring that none of them had done before. They arrived early and watched a team of flyers before them. An excited nervousness set in, but they encouraged each other to face this new challenge together! After learning the procedures, they got their gear and entered the tunnel with Cory, the instructor. Each of their first flights were wobbly, but when each girl got to her second flight, all they showed was confidence! Each of them exited the tunnel with an adrenaline of excitement and are eager to fly again!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

GSCO Photo Challenge: Our happy place

Submitted by Barbara Light

Metro Denver

Aurora

We never miss our chance to go to camp! It is our time to recharge and reconnect. It is time our troop cherishes. We make memories, enjoy s’mores, and laugh and laugh at the inside jokes we share. We do so much in a weekend together and are a stronger team because of it.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is hosting a photo challenge! Just submit your favorite Girl Scout photo and the story behind it using the Share Your Stories form (www.gscoblog.org/share). Winners will be featured in future GSCO marketing materials, on GSCO’s social media networks, and on the GSCO Blog.

Therapeutic cookies

Submitted by Brandi Borunda

Metro Denver

Brighton

Ariyanna is a first year Girl Scout and was recently diagnosed with High Spectrum Autism. She has a hard time socializing and being outgoing. So, we placed her in Girl Scouts hoping to help her through this tough time. Cookie sales came….and she THRIVED! Selling 596 packages to friends, family, and others. This event really helped her with her anxiety and struggles of talking to people (safely with us parents) about her own personal cookie goal. It helped peak her interest in money and its importance, reading and so much more. Girl Scouts has helped her come out of herself so much more and we couldn’t be more grateful! Her personality is flourishing and it helps us too as a family!

This is truly what Girl Scouts has done for her. She is coming out of her shell and is constantly thinking, looking for ways now to better the world and the people in it. Ariyanna took a huge risk in trying a group event because she is normally very much within her own thoughts a world. This program has helped open the eyes of her own troop both parents and kids to autism and has helped truly open her up to a whole new world!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Community Egg Hunt / Búsqueda de los Huevos @ Athmar Park Branch Library

Join Girl Scouts of Colorado for a non-denominational egg hunt on Saturday, April 13th! Families of all faiths and identities are welcome. Search Athmar Park Branch Library’s Community Room with your girl for plastic eggs in every hiding spot that contain candy and a fact about Girl Scouts from 10 A.M to 11 A.M, then learn more about the Girl Scout leadership experience as your girls enjoy spring-themed activities from 11 A.M to 11:30 A.M. This event is designed for girls in grades K, 1, 2, and girls currently in PreK and entering Kindergarten in Fall 2019, but all girls in grades PreK-12 and their families are welcome.

As a Girl Scout, your girl will practice leadership with grit like a go-getter, problem solve like an innovator, embrace challenges like a risk-taker, and show empathy like a leader—in an all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment where she can work together with her peers to discover, connect, and take action.

Event will take place on Saturday, April 13th from 10  A.M. – 11:30 A.M. at Athmar Park Branch Library in the Community Room located at 1055 S Tejon St, Denver, CO 80223. 

To start your girl’s membership with Girl Scout of Colorado visit: www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/join

¡Únete a Girl Scouts de Colorado para una búsqueda de los huevos no religiosos en sabado, 13 de abril! Familias de todos religiones y identidades están bienvenidos. A las 10 A.M – 11 A.M., busca en Athmar Park Branch Library (Biblioteca) en la sala de comunidad con sus niñas para huevos plásticos en todos de los lugares secretos –  los tienen dulces y un hecho sobre Girl Scouts. Después, aprenden más sobre la experiencia de liderazgo en Girl Scouts mientras sus niñas disfrutan actividades con la tema de la primavera. Este evento es para niñas en los grados K, 1, 2, y niñas que están en Pre-K (jardin de niños) ahora mismo y están entrando el Kindergarten en otoño 2019, pero todas niñas en grados PreK – 12 y sus familias están bienvenidos.

La experiencia de Girl Scouts está diseñada para ser guiada por las niñas. El tomar decisiones,el arreglo, y la comunicación son elementos esenciales para desarrollar lideres fuertes. Animamos a las niñas que aprendan haciendo. Les preguntamos que se arriesguen – quetraten y vean el resultado. Girl Scouts es una experiencia cooperativa – las niñas trabajan juntas para descubrir,conectar, y tomar acción en su comunidad.El evento está en sabado, 13 de abril a las 10 A.M – 11:30 A.M , en Athmar Park Branch Library en la sala de comunidad se encuentra a 1055 S Tejon St, Denver, CO 80223. 
A empezar la registración de su niña, hacer un clic a: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/2019_girl_registration_spanish

Cookies delivered to the USO post at DIA

1,800 packages of Girl Scout Cookies were delivered to the USO post at Denver International Airport on Tuesday, April 9, 2019 for active military members and veterans, along with their families, to enjoy. They are a portion of the 12,000 packages of cookies, which Girl Scouts delivered to the Rocky Mountain Regional VA Medical Center in Aurora on Thursday, March 28. In 2018, the USO at DIA  served more than 132,000 visitors. Skip Vanderbach, Center Director for USO Denver, wrote a beautiful thank you letter to Colorado Girl Scouts, which you can read below.

Making the world a better place is central to the Girl Scout mission. The Girl Scout Cookies that were delivered were purchased as part of Girl Scouts’ Hometown Heroes/Gift of Caring program. Customers purchase a package of cookies to donate to Girl Scouts’ heroes – a perfect solution for those who pass on the tempting treats! Girls learn about the invaluable work of their recipients by taking tours, learning about careers in public service, and helping with service projects. Girl Scouts’ Hometown Heroes/Gift of Caring program also honors non-profit organizations, food banks, military, and other uniformed personnel who are so important to the community.

Girl Scout Thank You

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Michelle Pierce

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Michelle Pierce of Lakewood in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Michelle to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer? 

When my oldest daughter was going to kindergarten, I knew I wanted her to have the Girl Scout experience I had as a child. My mom was the leader and I just knew I wanted to be one as well.  (That was 10 years ago now!)

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout. 

Well, I think I have had most every position you can have. I am a troop leader for two troops (both daughters), TCM for both troops, FPM for both troops, service unit manager for Rosewood, SUCM and SUFPM. Several years ago, I was the  school coordinator for Dennison Elementary.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer? 

The girls teach me new things all of the time. Teamwork with other leaders. Having support and friendships that are lasting because we have a same interest. Organization skills have improved. So much more.

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

They are important. Leading and growing into strong young women. Know that they can accomplish anything they set their mind to.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Be able to set goals and and take risks in life both professionally and personally. Also, to lead others to to get a common goal accomplished.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Gold Award Girl Scout: Danise Bachman, Northglenn, “Coping with Grief Around the Holidays Activity Pages”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

The main issue I wanted to address was coping with grief around holidays. Many kids/young adults struggle with grief during the holiday season and my idea was to use art theory as a way to help people cope. Together with a team of artists, we created over sixteen coloring pages that are focused around a variety of holidays. Based on feedback given during my initial presentation, each page is geared towards either kids or teen/young adults. I partnered with an organization called Judi’s House which is in Denver. They help grieving families by providing free group therapy. After hand drawing each page, we scanned them into a PDF document and gave it to Judi’s House on a flash drive for them to use with the kids and teens who they provide services for.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my project via feedback from surveys that were sent to Judi’s House clients as well as anonymous comments from the target audience.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Judi’s House has signed a letter of commitment saying that they will continue to use the pages. This means that they will print however many pages as long as they like. Judi’s House requested that we also make some general seasonal pages that they can use in the waiting rooms all year round. This was feedback and a request from Judi’s House that we implemented. I have also given the project to social workers at Colorado Preparatory Academy and Pikes Peak High School to use for the kids they work with.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

In order to establish a national/global link, I delegated the pages to be translated into Spanish to a team member who is proficient in the language. I then gave the pages that were translated to the organizations previously mentioned. Judi’s House also has a national curriculum and Colorado Preparatory Academy and Pikes Peak High School work with kids from all over nation. (Please note that all students enrolled in these two schools have a residence in Colorado, but many are from different states/countries and there are some students who temporarily live out of state as well.)

What did you learn about yourself?

The main thing I learned about myself is that if I put enough effort in something, I can make a difference. Before, this issue of grief around the holidays seemed to be one I couldn’t help. Now, I know that that is something I can do about this issue and others like it.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The Gold Award has not only given me the confidence and leadership skills I will need for the future, but it also will help me be considered for scholarships, colleges, and any jobs I will apply for.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

After being a Girl Scout for 13 years, I feel as though this is the perfect way to end my time at Girl Scouts. It has brought me closer with my fellow sister Girl Scouts and this project allows me to use many of the skills that Girl Scouts had taught me over the years.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning my Gold Award has helped me become a go-getter and a leader. There were many instances of me having to go out of my comfort zone to go get what I wanted for this project and I leading a team has been an amazing experience that has helped grow my leadership skills.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Alpine rescue and Troop 66528

Submitted by Kim McMahon

Metro Denver

Black Hawk

Our troop picked Alpine Rescue as our Hometown Hero. These ladies and gentlemen are all volunteers who put their lives on the line every day for residents and tourists alike to enjoy our beautiful state! They deserve so much more than cookies and we wanted to let them know how thankful we all are to them. Let’s give a big applause to each and every one of them! Thank you for your service!

We have a small group of four Juniors from Black Hawk. We work hard in play and also at the age of being involved in our community. These G.I.R.L.s have the desire to teach the younger ones what Girl Scouts involves, but also to make a difference in others’ lives! Now that cookie season is over, we will be focused on collecting stuffed animals for the senior center, so we can let everyone know that they still matter! Very proud of our girls and the goals they have set!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.