Tag Archives: Medal of Honor

Courageous Girl Scout shares her story

Katelyn Ibarra, a Girl Scout from Steamboat Springs who helped save lives after a city bus crashed, recently travelled to Washington, D.C. to be honored as a 2017 Citizen Honors Award winner by the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation.

On March 29, 2016, Katelyn and her family were on their way to eat dinner when they came upon a city bus that had crashed on U.S. Highway 40 near CR 44. The roads were very slick and icy from a snowstorm earlier in the day. As soon as Katelyn saw the crash, she knew she had to help. After climbing up a slippery, muddy slope to reach the front of the bus, Katelyn climbed through the broken windshield and into the bus. Without hesitation, she helped the driver and numerous passengers, many of whom were in shock, bleeding, or had other serious injuries.

In addition to this award, Girl Scouts of the USA awarded Katelyn the prestigious Medal of Honor for “saving life or attempting to save life without risk to the candidate’s own life.”

We asked Katelyn to share her story about that fateful night and the events that have followed. Here is her story:

Recently, my life was changed forever after I did a simple deed that I thought was a no-brainer. In March 2016, my family and I came upon a head-on collision between an SUV and a city bus. I assisted the victims by climbing up a muddy embankment and through the broken windshield of the bus where I helped  passengers who had facial injuries and were in shock. That night, I saw people from all characteristic spectrums. I saw people who didn’t slow down at all. I encountered people that had a weak stomach, but still tried to help. There were the others that helped like I did. In my mind, anyone and everyone would have done what I did, but on that night and the year to follow I learned otherwise. As I was once told, there are ordinary angels all over the place, it’s just a matter of them showing themselves. My biggest thought in the moment was, I would want someone to help me, so I made sure to help them!

After that night, the attention I received was way out of my comfort zone. I received the Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Meritorious Service Award and Girl Scouts of the USA’s Medal of Honor. In addition, the local newspaper wrote articles, I was interviewed on the news, and it was all over social media. I felt like telling the story was bragging, but that all changed last month.

was presented the Young Hero Citizens Award from the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation in Washington, D.C. It was an amazing experience and so humbling! I visited monuments, Arlington National Cemetery, the Joint Mayer Military Base, and the U.S. Capitol. I even got to eat dinner in the Library of Congress. I met such a sweet and inspiring lady named Molly who was awarded a Citizen’s Medal of Honor for stopping a school shooting. I also met over 20 men who had received the Congressional Medal of Honor for Valor (for saving lives while in the military). They told their stories in a simple and kind way and would never shame anyone while telling their stories. I realized there is a way to talk about my story while staying humble. Receiving the award wasn’t the point, the main point was showing your character by spreading kindness, helping others, and passing on good qualities.   

Men and women today and throughout history have sacrificed their lives everyday to keep us free. They are the reasons we are here today and can live the lifestyles we live now. When you see a veteran make sure to always thank them and to respect them. I’m still not really sure what to think about all this and how it will impact my life, but I’m definitely more comfortable about it now. You never know how your life can change in such a split second, both for the better or the worse. I’m thankful I was able to help that night.  

 

Steamboat Springs Girl Scout named 2017 Citizen Honors Award winner

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Katelyn Ibarra, a 16-year-old Girl Scout from Steamboat Springs who helped save lives after a city bus crashed, has been named a 2017 Citizen Honors Award winner by the Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Katelyn, along with five other heroes, will be recognized at a ceremony at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall in Arlington, Va., on National Medal of Honor Day, Saturday, March 25, 2017.

On March 29, 2016, Katelyn and her family were on their way to eat dinner when they came upon a city bus that had crashed on U.S. Highway 40 near CR 44. The roads were very slick and icy from a snowstorm earlier in the day. As soon as Katelyn saw the crash, she knew she had to help. After climbing up a slippery, muddy slope to reach the front of the bus, Katelyn climbed through the broken windshield and into the bus. Without hesitation, she helped the bus driver and numerous passengers, many of whom were in shock, bleeding, or had other serious injuries.

“The Citizen Honors Awards recognize and celebrate the exceptional deeds that America’s citizen heroes perform every day in communities across our nation,” said Thomas G. Kelley, Medal of Honor Recipient and president of the Congressional Medal of Honor Society. “Our 2017 winners embody the spirit of the Medal of Honor and represent the highest levels of service and heroism. They’ve earned this award through their courage, selfless service or commitment to our nation’s military service members and families.”

In September of 2016, Girl Scouts of the USA awarded Katelyn the prestigious Medal of Honor for “saving life or attempting to save life without risk to the candidate’s own life.” Tracy Shelton, an Ibarra family friend, was among those on bus. “She (Katelyn) needed no direction or instruction. She immediately went over to one of the most severely hurt. The blood didn’t faze her. She showed no shock. She was just this ‘strength’ among us,” wrote Shelton in a letter to Girl Scouts of the USA. “She responded in a way that was clearly above her age. She showed such a high level of maturity. I know adults that would not have climbed into that bus, with people screaming and all the blood.”

For more information about the Citizen Honors Award or the Medal of Honor and its recipients, visit the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation website at http://themedalofhonor.com.

 

 

Girl Scout saves lives after bus crash: Katelyn Ibarra receives Medal of Honor from Girl Scouts of the USA

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Girl Scouts of the USA has awarded the prestigious Medal of Honor to Katelyn Ibarra, a 16-year-old Girl Scout from Steamboat Springs, for saving numerous lives after a city bus crashed. On March 29, 2016, Katelyn and her family were on their way to eat dinner when they came upon a city bus that had crashed on U.S. Highway 40 near CR 44. The roads were very slick and icy from a snowstorm earlier in the day. As soon as Katelyn saw the crash, she knew she had to help. After climbing up a slippery, muddy slope to reach the front of the bus, Katelyn climbed through the broken windshield and into the bus. Without hesitation, she helped the bus driver and numerous passengers, many of whom were in shock, bleeding, or had other serious injuries.

Tracy Shelton, an Ibarra family friend, was among those on bus. “She (Katelyn) needed no direction or instruction. She immediately went over to one of the most severely hurt. The blood didn’t faze her. She showed no shock. She was just this ‘strength’ among us,” wrote Shelton in a letter to Girl Scouts of the USA. “She responded in a way that was clearly above her age. She showed such a high level of maturity. I know adults that would not have climbed into that bus, with people screaming and all the blood.”

Girl Scouts of the USA awards the Medal of Honor for “saving life or attempting to save life without risk to the candidate’s own life.” In March, Katie Hurley of Northglenn, Colo. was awarded the Medal of Honor for saving her mother’s life after her glucose levels dropped to a life-threatening level.

Girl Scout Saves Mother’s Life: Katie Hurley Receives Medal of Honor from Girl Scouts of the USA

 

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Girl Scouts of the USA has awarded the prestigious Medal of Honor to Katie Hurley, an 11-year-old Girl Scout from Northglenn, for saving her mother’s life. In August, Katie woke up early in the morning to find her mother, who is diabetic, suffering from an insulin reaction. Kristin Hurley’s glucose levels were extremely low. Without hesitation, Katie called 911. While she waited for the paramedics to arrive, she grabbed some juice to give her mother and cared for her 5-year-old brother.

In a letter to Girl Scouts of the USA, Lt. Cullen Lyle of North Metro Fire Rescue District wrote, “Katie showed extraordinary maturity and bravery by recognizing that her mother was in need of immediate attention by the fire department. She called 911 and made sure that she was understood in the midst of an extremely stressful situation. Katie displayed a calm demeanor that was beyond her years in actual age. It is a true pleasure to know that our citizens have the strength and courage to raise children that can act so decisively in the face of what must have been a terrifying event.”

Girl Scouts of the USA awards the Medal of Honor for “saving life or attempting to save life without risk to the candidate’s own life.” Katie is one of only 28 Girl Scouts nationwide who received this honor in 2015 and only the second in Colorado in recent history.

Montrose Girl Scout saves mom’s life

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In her mom’s eyes, Reanna is a hero.

For Reanna, she was just doing what needed to be done.

Earlier this spring, Michelle McKeehan, Reanna’s mother, awakened her daughter in the middle of the night because she wasn’t feeling well. Shortly after, Michelle collapsed. Being the only one at home, Reanna was quick to call 911 and communicate her mother’s condition, including checking for her pulse, monitoring breathing and checking for other injuries. When paramedics arrived, she was able to answer questions and give them her mother’s medications.

“Later when I saw my mom in the hospital, her first words to me were, ‘You’re my hero’,” said Reanna Lawhorn, 10, from Montrose.

Reanna credits the Girl Scouts for helping her learn how to handle emergency situations.

“I had earned Girl Scout badges where we practiced what to say when you call 911, how to answer questions as well as how to check someone’s pulse and see if they were breathing,” said Reanna.

On Friday, Sept. 7, Girl Scouts, with the help of Montrose Mayor Thomas Smits and representatives of the Montrose Fire Department, recognized Reanna’s heroic acts in saving her mom’s life by presenting her with the national Girl Scout Medal of Honor Lifesaving Award. This award has been presented only two other times in Colorado since 2009.

“It feels awesome that Girl Scouts has honored me,” said Reanna, who enjoys traveling and doing crafts and community service with Girl Scouts.

Reanna’s award has also been the “talk of the town in Montrose.” “My friends keeping asking me all about it,” commented Reanna.

“Reanna is a great role model and leader for our community, showing people you can step up to help someone else, no matter your age,” said Reanna’s mother, Michelle, who is also proud of the work her daughter has done in Girl Scouts with the town’s child advocacy center.

The Lifesaving Awards have been part of the Girl Scout program since the beginning of the movement in the United States. The Medal of Honor award recognizes Girl Scouts who have saved or attempted to save a human life under circumstances that demonstrate heroism without risk to their own lives. It is reserved for those Girl Scouts who have performed heroic acts beyond the degree of maturity and training to be expected at their age. For more information on the Lifesaving Award, contact your Membership Manager.

This award presentation generated media coverage in the Montrose Daily Press as well as on KJCT-TV (ABC).