Tag Archives: Loveland

Daisy’s Circle Supporter Spotlight: Linda Robinson

Tell us about your connection to Girl Scouts.

I am a lifetime member and long time volunteer. I was a Girl Scout as a girl for nine years and came back to help lead my oldest daughter’s Daisy troop in 1985. I was a leader for 20 years with my three daughters and am a proud mom to three Gold Award Girl Scouts. (One is a Daisy’s Circle member and troop leader in Colorado.) Currently, I volunteer on the GSCO History Committee, help with Core Camps at Meadow Mountain Ranch, and am active with Girl Scout Alumnae. I have also been serving on the Gold Award Committee since 2004.

What is the most valuable thing that Girl Scouts gives girls today?

The most valuable thing that Girl Scouts gives girls today is the power to make their own decisions. Girls are challenged to think for themselves and are given a safe space to make mistakes and learn from them.

Why did you join Daisy’s Circle?

I joined Daisy’s Circle as it an easy way to continue to give to a great organization without a lot of fuss.

What is the best thing about monthly giving?

It is easy because you don’t have to remember to write checks.

Is there anything else you would like us to know about you?

I have been happily married for 40 years and have two grandsons and one granddaughter. I enjoy traveling, gardening, sewing, reading, and spending time with family and friends.

Named after Girl Scout founder, Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low, Daisy’s Circle is Girl Scouts of Colorado’s monthly giving program. Funds raised through Daisy’s Circle provide financial assistance for girls and volunteers, support Outreach Programs and more.  For more information: https://www.gscodaisyscircle.org/

Bronze Award Girl Scouts: Because pets need to eat too

Submitted by Emily Sage

Northern & Northeastern CO

Loveland

Hi! We are Troop 71020. We are a Girl Scout Junior troop. We are going to share with you how we earned our Bronze Award, and what we learned along the way.

When it came to our Bronze Award, we thought of animals and said “what if they’re hungry?” We brainstormed as a troop and met with community organizations, and finally found the perfect idea: a pet food drive! A pet food drive would help decrease the number of pets that are starving. We also wanted to help people that couldn’t afford pet food, so we found a local charity called House of Neighborly Service that provides food to those in need, including pet food. We organized a pet food drive across our community; put collection boxes in local stores, schools, and churches; and advertised our drive and the need for pet food. Our drive lasted for three weeks and we collected 1,489 pounds of pet food! We used money earned from the Fall Product Program to purchase bins to help store all of the new pet food. House of Neighborly Service was very thankful for our donation.

While working on our Bronze Award, we faced a couple problems, such as some stores weren’t willing to sponsor our project. It was also hard to figure out how to help the whole community with just ten girls and meeting just one time a month. To solve these problems, we split up and each individually found a location to host our food drive boxes and we expanded our options to include churches, schools, and workplaces, rather than just retail stores. Of course, if we did this again, we would change a few things, like having more time to find locations to host our food drive.

Pets around the world still need food, and you can donate pet food to a local food pantry or animal shelter whenever you can. One person can make a difference by making an action or donation in their community or around the world.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twelve Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing Take Action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Brittany Argo from Aurora, Cherokee Trail High School, built a prayer garden at St. Michael’s the Archangel and aided in the construction of a prayer garden at a church in the Philippines.
  • Evyn Batie from Loveland, Mountain View High School, led a team of students to create the Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide, an electronic compilation of some of the best youth mental health resources across the region.
  • Bryce Civiello from Evergreen, Conifer High School, designed a pamphlet for teens that can help them take the first steps toward getting help from a mental health professional.
  • Angela Foote from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, developed a relationship between the organizations Family Promise of Denver and Denver Tech for All to ensure low-resource students and families have ongoing access to computers.
  • Madeline Ford from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Boys & Girls Club to create a five-session literacy program, which promotes a positive reading environment and teaches children new ways to express themselves through books and poetry.
  • Littlepage Green from Breckenridge, Summit High School, created a lesson plan and video to educate students about food allergies. In-person lessons also included training on how to properly use an epi-pen.
  • Maya Hegde from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Mangala Seva Orphanage in India and Brydges Centre in Kenya to teach girls how to make reusable sanitary pads using materials they already have. The program she developed also taught the girls how to sell sanitary pads in their own communities to tackle the stigma around the menstrual cycle.
  • Grace Matsey from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, created a music tutoring program for elementary and middle school musicians, which was run by members of her high school’s Music Honor Society.
  • Annarlene Nikolaus from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon High School, oversaw the construction of a series of buddy benches for local K-12 public schools. Students also participated in age-appropriate lessons led by Annarlene about buddy benches and what they can do to be better friends.
  • Bailey Stokes from Buena Vista, Buena Vista High School, created outdoor-based lesson plans for the use of fourth grade science teachers across Colorado. Topics covered included investigations, habitat, and adaptations.
  • Emma Lily from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a website, created a podcast, and wrote a children’s book celebrating the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory and its historical significance.
  • Katherine Walden from Larkspur, Castle View High School, taught elementary school students about the importance of bees and how to install bee boxes that local bee species and other pollinators can call home.

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership is making the world a better place.”

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Evyn Batie, Loveland, “Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Girl Scout Gold Award Project, I led a team of Mountain View High School students in creating and compiling the Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide. This guide is an electronic compilation of some of the best youth mental health resources across Northern Colorado, listing organizations from therapy groups to trainings on how to talk to people in your life about suicide. The organizations listed in the guide had been selected based on participation in another event I planned and hosted last year, Mountain View’s first-ever “Spread The Health,” a mental health awareness night, and each group had proven themselves to care deeply about youth mental health. My team created this guide to ensure that, whether or not students had attended this event, any student could all have access to the mental health resources many in our country, state, county, and school district need.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The impact of the guide was measured through surveys my team and I designed and distributed in various classrooms around Mountain View. We asked students questions about the current state of their mental health and whether the resources in the guide would be helpful to them in the future. We found the majority of students said that they will most likely utilize one of the organizations in the future the most prevalent being safeTALK, a suicide awareness training that 31 out of 50 kids said they are likely to utilize.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

This project was designed to be sustained without my involvement. By creating an electronic resource, training a youth team with students of various grade levels, working with the MVHS Advisor Board (a team of teachers who gave approval for the publication of this guide), and working without a budget, I have ensured my project is sustainable. An electronic resource ensures that even as I step away from this project, others are always able to continue its development and publication. My team is well-rounded and large enough that, even if one person doesn’t continue, there will be someone able to sustain the project for years to come. Choosing to initiate this project without a budget not only made the process less stressful for me, but also ensured the school district’s continued interest as they do not have much money to spend. Additionally, Mr. Smith, one of Mountain View’s counselors, has passed the guide on to other local high schools which secures the guide’s future as a resource in the Thompson School District.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The complex task of working to improve mental health, provide resources, and deal with the stigma of getting help is a problem facing our entire country and world today. Mental Health America states that, “56% of American adults with mental illnesses do not receive treatment.” And according to stats from Our World In Data, “15% of all the world’s population has mental disorder of some kind.” The same process used for this project at Mountain View High School in Loveland, Colorado, could be used to help students in schools all around the country and the world facing so many of the same things.

What did you learn about yourself?

Through my Gold Award, I learned that we can always keep growing. I have taken on huge leadership projects and commitments in the past, but nothing like the Gold Award. Working on a project, creating something important, is a very different phenomenon when you’re working alone. However, the Gold Award committee challenged me and pushed me to broaden my leadership skills, expand my team, and release the reins of control that I often hold so tightly. I learned a lot about myself as a leader when I had to lead so many people and have as much faith in their skills as I do my own.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My future is dedicated to the cause of mental health and the Gold Award was another step towards that. I have the joy now of knowing that I have reached the highest level I can in an organization of leaders while educating others on a topic I am passionate about.  I am walking away from Gold Award with stronger leadership skills such as communication, time-management, and delegation and with a deeper understanding of mental health and how to share my message.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been a Girl Scout for ten years and earned my Bronze and Silver awards. It felt natural and even necessary to earn the Gold. My Gold Award was the compilation of every skill Girl Scouts has ever taught me from being a leader to being a friend, being creative to begin assertive. The Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it gave me the chance to show everything I had learned through this organization and that has been the most amazing opportunity I could ever have had.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Go-Getter: I saw the mental health problem prevalent in my community and my life and began to consider the factors that contributed. The lack of awareness students seemed to have about the resources there to help them stood out and I knew I needed to find a way to share those with all students.

Innovator: The idea of a compiled resource guide was one that very few people had ever seen and being able to do a Girl Scout Gold Award electronically and for no cost at all was an unusual method of action.

Risk-taker: It was a huge step outside of my comfort zone to work with a large team of youth and wonder if they’d be able to deliver all the things I needed, but ultimately, working with them made the guide so much better than it would have been without them.

Leader: I was able to utilize all the best skills I have learned from ten years of being a Girl Scout to lead a team to create the best possible project for our community.

Gold Award helped me become the best G.I.R.L. I could be.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Veterans Day parade

Submitted by Thomas Parker, Associated Veterans of Loveland

Northern & Northeastern CO

Loveland

I am parade coordinator for Loveland, Veterans Day parade. I am looking for a troop or two to march in this honorable parade. The event is November 11, 2018 at 11:11 a.m. Parade line-up starts at 9:30 a.m. and is approximately one-mile long.

Questions? Call (970) 744 – 9440.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scout Night with Colorado Eagles Hockey

Saturday, November 3, 2018

7:05 p.m.

Budweiser Events Center

5290 Arena Circle

Loveland, CO 80538

The Colorado Eagles will host their annual Girl Scout Night on Saturday, November 3 vs. the Tucson Roadrunners at 7:05 p.m. Don’t miss your chance to see the new AHL team with this great offer!

Details:

  • Specially priced tickets for only $18 each (a savings of $9 per ticket)
  • First 200 to purchase tickets will receive a new Colorado Eagles patch
  • Special experiences include a photo on the ice after the game and player autographs for the largest troop in attendance

$1 per ticket sold will go back to the Girl Scouts of Colorado.

* Patch vouchers can be redeemed at Guest Services during the game.

Your tickets will be left at Will Call under the name used during checkout unless otherwise specified. Please include your troop number in the comments section to be seated with your group.

Questions? Contact Sean Linfield at 970-686-SHOT (7468) or slinfield@coloradoeagles.com.

Register at: https://eagles.isportstix.com/order/group/SCOUTNIGHT18/

Service Unit 747’s first group hike

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Service Unit 747 held their first group hike at Devil’s Backbone in Loveland. Four Girls Scouts, two leaders, one parent, and five dogs joined the fun! It was a great day with great weather for a hike!

Our next group hike is October 7, 2018 at 9 a.m. at Hewlett Gulch. Please RSVP to ariellanetanya@gmail.com if you, your troop, or families would like to participate!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Grrridiron Girls flag football camp with the first female NFL coach

Submitted by Natalie Phillips

Northern & Northeastern CO

Loveland

My name is Natalie Phillips and I am working with Dr. Jen Welter, gold medalist and the first female NFL coach, in partnership with the NFL Alumni, to bring a Grrridiron Girls flag football camp to Northern Colorado on Sunday, August 12, 2018.

It is for girls ages 6-18 and we have in-kind donations from Scheels in Johnstown, as well as Freddy’s Burgers in Loveland. The MileHigh Blaze, a semi-pro women’s tackle football team, will also be helping out.

Here is the Eventbrite link for registration and more information on Jen Welter:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/jen-welters-grrridiron-girls-flag-football-camp-northern-colorado-tickets-48005967140

I met Jen Welter initially at a UN Foundation Girl Up Leadership Summit over a year ago and since then, have been connected to her and had the opportunity to hear her speak and inspire business owners and entrepreneurs, as well as young kids in her multiple football camps. In addition, she released her first book, Play Big, in October 2017 and has been on a speaking circuit and book tour with multiple media outlets. She is incredibly inspirational and I am SO excited for her to agree to bring her camp to Colorado and we are lucky enough to be able to run it in Northern Colorado at Mountain View High School!

Please visit her website www.jenwelter.com for more information about Jen and her multiple camps.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Loveland

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at Embassy Suites in Loveland on April 22, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 190 in Northern and Northeastern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. 32 girls across Northern and Northeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award. Seven girls across Northern and Northeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

2016 Gold Award Girl Scout, National Young Woman of Distinction, and winner of the 2016 Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Troop 73061 honors Thompson Valley EMS

Submitted by Lisa Zubia

Northern & Northeastern CO

Loveland

Troop 73061 picked the Thompson Valley EMS for our Hometown Hero because they were a great help to our leader’s family, when he passed away in December.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.