Tag Archives: Littleton

Explore quilting with CQC

Submitted by Mitzi King

Metro Denver

Littleton

We’d love for you and your families to join us for our second annual event. We had such a great time last year, we’re doing it again.

The Colorado Quilting Council is hosting this family-friendly event to encourage Colorado youth to enjoy learning about quilting and related sewing arts.

The event is being held at the South Fellowship Church in Littleton at 6560 South Broadway. From 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. We’ll have giveaways, a raffle, make & take projects, a presentation, food, and fun.

This year we’ll be giving away an American girl doll complete with her very own mini quilt. And our grand prize is a brand new sewing machine donated by Costco.

Come join the fun and learn about CQC. Don’t forget to bring any project that you’d like to show us. We look forward to seeing you.

Questions or to request more information: Call Mitzi 303-816-9566, or email cdc.youth@gmail.com

The CQC website: coloradoquiltcouncil.com

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kelsey Harry, Littleton, “Operation Eagle”

 

kelsey-harry

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created Operation Eagle which is a high school club that addresses the issues of the U.S. military’s need of supplies that give them some comfort from home, narrows the emotional gap between soldiers overseas and their community/home, and addresses the lack of military knowledge in our community.  Operation Eagle aims to send as many care packages as possible to troops overseas to help the soldiers feel loved and supported, as well as to spread awareness of our troops in the community. To involve more of the community, individual Operation Eagle members visited elementary schools to work with students to write positive letters of support that were mailed to troops overseas. The troops benefit from this project because they receive supplies that they desperately need and gain a feeling of love and support from the communities that they left behind. Communities also benefit because they gain knowledge about what military life is really like in parts of the world where there is life and death conflict and communities also receive satisfaction by knowing that they helped support the people that are constantly sacrificing in order to preserve our freedom.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience? 

Pictures of our smiling troops surrounded by packages collected by Operation Eagle efforts are extremely gratifying and proof of our immediate impact on U.S. soldiers. It is very apparent that our heroes know of the love and support from this community. The cards, letters, donated items, and shipping box decorating identify the care and concern from our community towards our troops.  This level of effort and love is a sure sign that the educational efforts provided by OE are having a positive and lasting effect on our military. It is also apparent that OE club members have gained skills as well, one being the ability to communicate with principals, teachers, students, and other club members.

How is your project sustainable?  How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

My project will be sustained since the teacher sponsor of Operation Eagle has committed to continue the club past my involvement. A current underclassman will be taking on the leadership position of this club once I have graduated. Long-term impact of Operation Eagle would be the continuation of the impact OE is currently having on our troops and on our community.  It would be the continuing education of students and community members of what military life is like, as well as the teaching on the needs of our soldiers.  It would also be continuing to collect cards, letters, and needed items for our military. But, the most important long-term impact of OE would be that our troops continue to feel the love and support from all of us, the people they choose to put their lives on the line for every day.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection? 

Sending letters and needed items to our soldiers connects us to our loved ones, even when they are thousands of miles away. The soldiers feel closer as well. The global link to my project is that Operation Eagle is connecting communities with overseas soldiers.  Communities are giving thanks and showing appreciation to our troops by sending care packages; and community members are also supporting fellow community members by supporting their loved ones in the military.

What did you learn about yourself?

Not only have I discovered so much about myself throughout my project, I have also discovered a great deal about the world around me, and how I can make the world a better place. I chose to start Operation Eagle because I saw a problem in the world that I wanted to help eliminate. After finding a worldwide problem and doing whatever I could to help extinguish it, I discovered that I will seek more world problems in the future and do whatever I can to help. I discovered the type of person that I want to be. I want to be someone who makes a difference in the world and perseveres to reach her goals. I want to be a person who seeks challenges to overcome.  I encountered many challenges during my project, but I always stayed true to myself and I always kept my goal in mind.  I discovered who I am through my project.  I am a leader, a helper, a problem solver, and a confident young woman.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I have learned so much about myself during this process and the type of person that I want to be and I know that this project is only the beginning. Because of Operation Eagle I want to, and am going to, seek world problems and help solve them, because the feeling of helping others and being kind is truly invaluable.  I have become a leader and I know these skills will grow in the future.  I am going to continue to help others, be kind, be confident, and make the world a better place.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Besides the great feeling of helping the community and giving back, I feel a sense of accomplishment. I think it is very important to finish something that you’ve started. The Gold Award sums up my whole Girl Scout experience. I have implemented all of the skills learned from Girls Scouts into this project.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Troop 2774 delivers over 200 packages of cookies to Hometown Heroes

 

Submitted by Lori Closs

Littleton

Denver Metro

Our troop of just 8 girls got over 200 packages of donations for our Hometown Heroes – West Metro Fire (Station 13). Even though it was cold and snowy, the men LOVED getting cookies. They were so excited they offered a tour and had a box half gone before we left!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Teachers are our heroes!

40963104_AGE HTH Pic

Submitted by Laura Hopkins

Littleton

Denver Metro

Before cookie season started, the 4th and 5th grade Juniors of Troop 60074 voted to determine who their Hometown Hero would be. They discussed people caring for animals, homeless people, fire fighters and more. Finally, they decided that the people they really wanted most to recognize this year are the amazing staff and teachers of their school, who put in countless hours making our community a better place! Here’s to the staff and teachers of Acres Green Elementary! Principal Gina Smith accepted the cookies on behalf of the school. Girl Scouts, cookies and school staff are a great combination!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

8th grade Cadette Troop travels to North Carolina

Submitted by Amy Caperton

Littleton

Southwestern Colorado

Our troop saved money for 2 years through cookie sales and other fundraisers to travel to North Carolina in July 2015. The girls decided on the location of Roanoke Island. We visited an aquarium, climbed the tallest lighthouse in North America, took a ghost tour and a sunset dolphin tour, visited The Wright Brothers Museum and spent a few afternoons at the beach! We had a great time and can’t wait for our next adventure

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Allison Caperton, Littleton, “Adaptive Gymnastics”

Allison Caperton

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I coordinated a special needs gymnastics camp at JetKids Gymnastics. I hoped to make an impact in the lives of families and children with a variety of special needs. I wanted to give these kids a chance to be involved in such an incredible sport.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact by watching the kids grow throughout the weeks, and making sure each kid was gaining something.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The model I created (a four-week adaptive gymnastics camp for children of all ages with special needs) is currently being sustained at JetKids Gymnastics in Littleton, Colorado. An early-summer session was held, and the gym is making plans for more.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

JetKids Gymnastics has a working relationship with many other gyms across the country. By presenting my project to these other gyms and offering my advice and services to help them launch their programs, I am linking the success of my project to a national and global community.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned I am smart, strong, able to organize and direct others, sensitive to the needs of my community, able to adapt to challenges, and perfectly capable of making the world a better place. I am proud to represent the Girl Scouts of Colorado with my enduring, global project.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I am proud of the lasting legacy I will leave in my community when I go off to college. I feel like I have served not only children with special needs and their families, but also the sport of gymnastics, which has meant so much to me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience? 

If I had not camped with my Daisy troop (when we were just in kindergarten), I might not have learned the strength and tenacity it takes to survive challenges. If I had not found the courage to sell cookies to strangers, I might not have learned confidence. If I had not organized and put into action several Rendezvous weekends for younger girls, I might not have learned the organizational and leadership skills it took to create and implement my project.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Ambassador Troop enjoys final summer overnight

Submitted by Kathy Nester

Littleton

Denver Metro

Troop 52662 started in 1st grade in 2004 with 5 girls. By 2nd grade, the troop had 12 girls in it. Of those 12 girls, 8 are still with the troop. They go to 6 different High Schools now; 4 in Littleton, 1 in Aurora and one in Katy, Texas (this girl Skypes in for meetings). We had 2 girls join the troop when their troops disbanded in the 5th & 6th grades.

They have gone on a trip every summer since the troop started; some little and local & some big and far away. They will all be Seniors in HS this coming year, so they wanted to have one last summer trip. They planned a trip to Hamp Hut in Colorado Spring and had a great time. They went hiking (a few even did the incline trail) zip-lining, the Cheyenne Mt. Zoo and swimming at a local mountain pond (no worries there were 2 certified life guards with them). One night they played a game of Troop Jeopardy, trying to remember 11 years of troop history was challenging! Here’s to your troop staying together that long!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Travel to London, Paris, Lucerne, Florence & Rome in 2016

 

Submitted by Katherine Nester

Littleton

Denver Metro

Ever dream of going to Europe and seeing the Girl Scout World Centers there? Well, now you can: June 19th – July 3rd, 2016. Colorado Girl Scout Council is planning a trip with EF Tours called London to Lucerne with an extension into Italy (if there is not an adult who want to end the trip in Lucerne, the extension will be required for all girls) We will begin touring London (visiting Pax Lodge), then Paris and on to Switzerland (My Chalet where we will spend the night!) (end 11 day tour). After Switzerland, the tour extends to Florence and Rome (15 days).

Join other Colorado Girl Scouts for this wonderful trip almost everything is included. Lunch is not included to allow individuals to decide what type of lunch they want to have, as well as a few other small expenses.

So, come join us for a wonderful trip at great price! We’re going to have a great time!!

click on this link for all the details:
http://girltrips.eftours.com/preview-tour.aspx?pt=1534581zy

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Sisters Forever

Submitted by Bridget Gwyn

Littleton

Denver Metro

I have been a Girl Scout since 1st grade- that’s a continuous seven years. Although our troop has had people come and go, I’ve basically grown up with my fellow Girl Scouts. It was only now, after I was looking through a scrapbook given to us by our troop leaders when we became Cadettes, that I realized how much these girls are my sisters.

You always hear “You are a sister to every fellow Girl Scout”, but it doesn’t affect you that much when you are younger. The picture that triggered these feelings is when my troop went to Pueblo a few summers ago. We are all poolside, feet in the water, hair messed up, and our arms wrapped around one another’s shoulders as we look at the splashing children. It’s such a small act that others might dismiss it easily. But the thing is, we weren’t told to do that; we all immediately excepted each other, embraced each other. And that’s beautiful: it’s a kind of natural love that I know will last forever.

And it’s true, we have had our drama at trips- who’s being left out, who’s being unfair. But we always have some kind of unspoken agreement when we are planning our vacations (it was a unanimous vote to go to North Carolina this summer) or simple things like what songs we want turned up or what Rendezvous we want to plan or food we want to eat.

These girls -all different and unique and amazing in their own ways- have always been there for me and vice verse. It’s the kind of friendship you only read about in books, and I’m lucky enough to have found it. Maybe fate stuck us in the same Girl Scout troop, but I’m thanking you, GS. You gave me a love that only us Scout’s get, and I really appreciate that.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.