Tag Archives: Littleton

Girl Scouts deliver cookies to Buckley Air Force Base

Submitted by Cassie Aymami

Metro Denver

Littleton

On May 10, 2018, three Girl Scout troops from the Denver Metro region delivered more than 18,000 packages of Hometown Hero Girl Scout Cookies to military and personnel at Buckley Air Force Base in Aurora. While three troops helped with the delivery, the cookies themselves were donated by at least a dozen troops, including: 62589, 65412, 61281, 60900, 65486, 13461, 61414, 65478, 60238, 65431, 64522, and 61053. Some of the cookies will also be delivered to Military Family Assistance programs.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Laurie Stragand

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Laurie Stragand of Littleton in the Metro Denver region was nominated by her daughter as a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Laurie to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a volunteer first to help with the Brownie group in our troop.  They had a lot of girls and the leaders seemed stretched thin. I thought I could make a difference with the group my daughter was in.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

My volunteering started with the Brownies and during my daughter’s second Brownie year. I have continued being a leader during my daughter’s time as a Junior and will carry on as a Cadette leader. I became our troop cookie mom in 2014-15 and have served as our cookie mom every year since.  Last year, I also volunteered for the treasurer position. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Girl Scouts has given me a surprising benefit from being both cookie mom and treasurer; with both of these positions my skill with Excel has increased dramatically.  On a serious note, I have learned that you get out of Girl Scouting what you put into it and my daughter’s experience, along with the other girls, is better for my being actively involved.

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

I hope the girls have learned from me while helping them with the badges.  As second year Juniors, the girls worked in groups and presented a badge for the rest of the Junior group.  I hope this helps the girls learn to be more independent, purchase within a set budget, take the initiative to research and lead the badges, and practice public speaking skills to overcome the fear of presenting to a group.  I also hope my own daughter has personally learned that it may not be easy to volunteer but with the right group/troop support it can be very rewarding.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Before taking on the roles I have in our troop, I was not used to being out in front of people. I am very comfortable doing things in the background.  As TCM for a troop of over 50 girls, I have created spreadsheets for booths to account for physical sales and the new digital side, for planning the initial cookie order, organizing cookie pickup times, and to schedule the last day for cookie return/settlement.  Holding parents and girls accountable for money and the schedule forces you to be assertive to achieve a better outcome for the whole troop. 

As treasurer, I have tried to make sure all the leaders are repaid the money they spend for badges and supplies in a timely manner.  To do that, we had to raise our troop dues and explain why the increase was necessary.  I feel in a smaller single level troop that would have been much easier than explaining to the parents of 50 girls in a multi-level troop why we needed a 60% increase in troop dues to continue to provide and an excellent program without the volunteer leaders personally covering the fees and expenses.
Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Troop 60474 earns highest awards

Submitted by Cherie Piccone

Metro Denver

Littleton

In their quest for their Bronze and Silver Awards, the girls of Troop 60474 identified the need for a summer food bank for kids in their own community. The girls have always participated in community service projects at shelters by preparing and serving food. When planning for their award projects, they felt passionate about helping kids from their own community. They were shocked to learn that children from their own school struggled on weekends with access to food. The girls didn’t realize that without access to school breakfast/lunch programs during the weekend, the last meal low-resource children may have would be lunch on Friday until they returned to school on Monday morning. The girls were concerned about the obstacles these kids would face during the summer and decided to take action. They reached out to several food banks, but discovered limited resources during the summer and decided to create their own summer food bank.

With two Juniors and 11 Cadettes in the same troop, the girls broke off into smaller, more focused groups to make their goal a reality. Each small group addressed different aspects of establishing the food bank. For example, three girls were responsible for procuring sites for the food drives and organizing the sign-ups. Another small group was responsible for proper storage, sorting, and labeling of food. Another group was responsible for creating a well-balanced, weekly selection of foods. (i.e. three fruits, three veggies, three proteins). They also created a spreadsheet that organized what food, which families, and the dates. Another group worked with the procurement of the pick-up site and arranged the sign-up for weekly drop-offs.

They could partner with a local church to arrange for weekly drop-offs. It was important to the girls that the recipients and themselves remained anonymous. Because the church had limited space, the girls had to arrange for weekly drop-offs over the course of the whole summer. Not only were the families happy to have the weekly donations, they discovered that this church could help them longterm. Many of the families found another resource to help them. Because of this, their summer food bank continued to help these families even when school resumed.

As the leader for Troop 60476, it was difficult to take on the Bronze and Silver Awards with such a large and mixed level troop. I am confident that the work these young ladies completed made an impact in our community where needs are not always easily identified. I am amazed and proud of their accomplishments.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Silver Award presentation

Submitted by Sarah Benjamin

Metro Denver

Littleton

Cadette Troop 61353 from Littleton is presenting their Silver Award project on May 6, 2018 at 4 p.m. at the Columbine Library on why feeding ducks bread is bad for them and the environment.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Cassie Aymami

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Cassie Aymami of Littleton in the Metro Denver region is the manager of the South JeffCo Cookie Cupboard. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Cassie to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

A few years ago, my daughter was asking to join Girl Scouts. Unfortunately, there was not a troop at her school. So, I started a troop with a great co-leader. There are many girls who don’t get opportunities to try new things, explore, be brave, take risks, and go after their goals and dreams. I love the thrill of new adventures and thought it’d be fun and rewarding to share adventures with the girls. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Troop leader, cookie cupboard,  service unit fall sale and cookie sale manager. And anything else Girl Scouts of Colorado asks for help with.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

1. Everyone has a story. Each person has their own unique story and it’s important to respect, appreciate, and take the time to learn their story.

2. The smallest of things can have a big impact. One new opportunity or one kind message can open a whole new world to these young girls. They will see that what they thought was impossible is possible. They will know they can accomplish anything.

3. Gratitude. Being a volunteer has changed how I look at things. It reminds me on a daily basis what really matters: family, friends, health, and to remember the small things that give me joy.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope they learn what I have learned: everyone has a story, the smallest of things can have a big impact and gratitude. I hope they also learn making mistakes is okay. Mistakes mean you are trying and you are learning. Taking risks might mean a mistake along the way, but it’s okay. Take the path that is needed to get to your goal and to fulfill your dreams.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have always been these things and have raised my children this way. The G.I.R.L is part of being a strong, independent, honest, positive, respectful, loving, courageous, and successful young lady. All the qualities of the leaders we need and are making through Girl Scouts. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Amy Caperton

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Amy Caperton of Littleton in the Metro Denver region has served as a troop leader and Product Program volunteer for many years. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Amy to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a leader when my younger daughter started kindergarten. My older daughter was already involved in Girl Scouts, so I wanted to be sure my younger daughter also had an opportunity to do so. I was not sure I would have time to do it with working full-time and having three children, however it has been a great experience that I have thoroughly enjoyed. I would not change it for anything.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started as troop cookie manager for my older daughter’s troop. I did that for 12 years. I was also my service unit’s cookie cupboard for two years. I moved on to service unit cookie manager, a role which I have done now for eight years. I have also been fall product program manager for my service unit for the last three years. Finally, and most importantly, I have been a leader for my troop since kindergarten, so this is my 11th year as their leader.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that it is important to listen to what the girls have to say, be patient and understanding, and have lots of resources available to accomplish our troop goals.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls in my troop, wether presently or not, have learned to stand up for what they believe in, speak for themselves, be accountable for their words and actions, not be afraid to take risks, think outside the box, and be kind to others– truly live by the Girl Scout Law.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have become a go-getter in figuring out what I needed to do to accomplish my troop’s goals. I had to be an innovator by rolling with the punches. When things don’t go as planned, I’ve learned you have to adapt.  I’ve had to be a risk-taker by trying new things and getting outside my comfort zone at times. My role as leader has benefitted me by helping me be more outspoken in other aspects of my life as well. I think overall it has benefitted me to know I can accomplish what I set out to do and also be more confident in myself.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Best Cookie Dad contest: Why my Cookie Dad is the best

Submitted byJosie O., Junior Troop 61631

Metro Denver

Littleton

My dad (people call him Patrick) is the best Cookie Dad because he uses his truck and trailer to pick up our troop’s cookies every year. This is a big deal because our troop picks up 5,000+ packages at the first pick up. He also supports me by eating packages of Tagalongs secretly in the garage (without Mom knowing). He gives me funny phrases to say to my customers, like, “Excuse me? What time is it?….It’s Girl Scout cookie time!”

He brings me to the neighborhood where he grew up to sell cookies door-to-door to his old friends and neighbors. He helps me make yard signs, counts my inventory, and then eats more Tagalongs. My dad is my number one customer and my number one sales trainer. He helped me sell 1,031 packages this year. He’s the best Cookie Dad out there!

I’m a G.I.R.L. because I’m a risk-taker. This summer I’m moving out of my comfort zone by going to Girl Scout Camp without anyone from my troop. I know I’ll make new friends. I’m a little nervous, but hey, I’m a risk-taker!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form and is part of the 2018 contest for Best Cookie Dad.

Best Cookie Dad contest: My dad is a cookie rockstar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted by Leah

Metro Denver

Littleton

Hi! My name is Leah and I am a 6th grader. My dad is a cookie rockstar. I’ve been selling cookies since kindergarten and he helps drive the cookies to the cookie booth and helps me set up my table and chairs. He likes to sing songs and dance around our cookie booth!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form and is part of the 2018 contest for Best Cookie Dad.  Is your Cookie Dad the best? Tell us about him and he’ll win a cool prize!

BeHerd: Equine-assisted activities program

Submitted by Catherine Berra

Metro Denver

Littleton

Hello! What began as a new adventure in my own life, one of adopting and riding a rescue horse, has transformed into a program to assist others in finding their path to self-confidence. Horses are magical and magnificent creatures and offer a wonderful partnership in our journey as humans. One of the truly important parts of any successful endeavor is to assess our own herds, the people we choose to be in our life. The BeHerd program partners with horses and offers a forum for conversation regarding our own choices in our lives. Partnering with a horse on the ground, we discuss the herd mentality, vision and respect. Participants are able to verbalize their thoughts while grooming the horse and discussing their current and future “herds.”

This program will help Girl Scouts earn requirements toward their Junior Horseback Riding badge!

Contact BeHerdllc.com 720-421-5033

Amazing girls do amazing things! I believe our self-confidence stems from our choices. Horses listen and reveal to us like mirrors and I’m excited to share these lessons!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteers needed: Cookie delivery day 2018

Delivery Day for the 2018 Girl Scout Cookie Program is fast approaching. The delivery sites are always needing more support and your help would be appreciated. If you haven’t already signed up for a time to support the delivery site, there is still time.

Broomfield **NEEDS VOLUNTEERS

1025 Eldorado Boulevard

Broomfield, CO 80021

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-level1

*This is our largest site with the least volunteers signed up.

Red Rocks Community College

13300 West Sixth Ave.

Lakewood, CO 80228

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-redrocks

Castle Rock- Castle View High School

5254 N. Meadows Dr.

Castle Rock, CO 80109

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-douglas

 Summit Ridge Middle School

11809 W Coal Mine Ave

Littleton, CO 80127

Sign UP:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-redrocks1

Elitch Gardens

2000 Elitch Cir,

Denver, CO 80204

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-summit1

Baileys Moving

11755 E. Peakview Ave

Englewood, CO 80111

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-baileys

Buehler

16456 E. Airport Cir #100

Aurora, CO 80011

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-buehler

Northern Delivery/Loveland

5296 Harvest Lake Drive

Loveland, CO 80538

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0f4fafa923a75-cookie2

If you are wanting to go to a delivery site that isn’t listed please reach out to the PPS for that region, to find out how to sign up. Don’t know who that is? Email inquiry@gscolorado.org.