Tag Archives: Littleton

Rainbow Alley honored as Hometown Heroes

Submitted by Laura Hopkins

Metro Denver

Littleton

Cadette Troop 60074 tries to think outside of the box when it comes to choosing Hometown Heroes, and pick organizations that don’t get donations from other troops. This year, they chose Rainbow Alley, a community center for LGBTQ youth in Denver. When we brought the cookies in, they gave us a great tour and explained all of the services they offer for young people. We hope that the staff, volunteers, and kids enjoy the cookies!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Troop 60678 earns “Musician” badge

Submitted by Melissa Sommers

Metro Denver

Littleton

Our troop went to Do Re Mi Lessons in Littleton and had a blast learning about a variety of instruments. We got to hear the violin, viola, and cello and give them each a try. Do Re Mi owners, Dean and Desiree Hirschfield, played an Irish jig using the violin, also known as a fiddle, and the cajon, which we learned was a percussion instrument. Charlotte organized the event. She and Dean composed a song together and taught it to the rest of the troop.

Charlotte learned about music from around the world! She was an innovator and risk-taker by composing a song and performing to her troop. She taught the song to her troop and they performed it at the end of the event!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Amanda Brown

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Amanda Brown of Westminster in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Amanda to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I was a Girl Scout and loved it!  My mom was one of my leaders and my grandmother was her leader when she was younger. My daughter expressed interest when we received a flyer at her school in kindergarten. After that, I knew it was going to be such a great opportunity for her and all of the girls in the program. I have since realized that the need for these girls to have this sense of sisters and empowerment is my drive in being their leader.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I began as my daughter’s troop leader almost seven years ago and have since helped start our service unit up again. I am on our service unit team and assist in recruiting, running our meetings, assisting leaders throughout the year with issues, questions, etc. I also serve as a service unit cookie manager. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned so much from being a volunteer. This stretches from realizing how many opportunities there are for girls all the way to realizing that these girls look up to me. Learning how much they depend on my leadership and how I have impacted their lives is truly the best experience. I have also learned throughout the years that girls from all different backgrounds and experiences can come together and grow and impact the lives of each other. I learned that starting this journey with my daughter was one of the best things I have done for her and with her. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope girls have learned that they can be themselves and that they all have a place and can be anyone they want to be and they will succeed. I have shown them that being a leader is important, not only as an adult but as a girl. They can grow up to be a Girl Scout leader themselves and help others the same way I have helped them realize their full potential. Not everything is easy and there are stressors along the way, but when you put your mind to something, you can do it and help others along the way. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I am a go-getter and work hard to reach goals and help the girls get where they need to be. I am an innovator by creating new ways to do things tailored to the needs and wants of the girls. I am a risk-taker and will go into a troop meeting with my head high even when I am unprepared. If the girls think something is unachievable, we go for it and see what comes about from it. That is when I lead them in the right direction while they set their goals and always end up achieving them. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Gold Award Girl Scout: Summer Gehman, Littleton, “The Roundup River Library”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I built a library at Roundup River Ranch. The camp is for children who have or have had life-threatening illnesses. Due to the children having these illnesses, they are missing school and their literacy rates are dropping. The library that was built at the camp to address that problem, along with giving the campers something to do.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

To measure the impact on my project, I went directly to the people who are going to be using it. I asked the campers for their feedback and also got families and camp staff to give me feedback. Through their feedback, I was able to see how my project was going to affect the campers.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

To make sure that my project would continue after I finished it, I asked my project supervisor to sign a letter of commitment. On top of a letter of commitment, I left extra supplies for the checkout system, so it would last them longer. Lastly, the camp helped me come up with the idea of the library.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

For my global connection, I ended up working with a non-profit organization located in Kentucky called the International Book Project. This organization works with third world countries to increase literacy rates.

What did you learn about yourself?

This project helped me learn a lot of good and bad things about myself. One of the main things that I was able to learn was that I am not a people person and like to have my alone time to work on my projects. I also got to see how much of a perfectionist I was and was able to learn that not everything has to be perfect.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The Gold Award will help me in the future because I was able to work on many of the skills that I needed. For example, I learned to be a team member, instead of doing it all on my own. Also, I grew to have stronger leadership skills that will help me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it let me go higher in Girl Scouts. Also, it helped me become an inspiration for the little girls in Girl Scouts to keep going.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Through this project, I have grown as a leader in so many ways. One way that I have grown as a leader is not being afraid to tell someone that they are doing something wrong. Before the project, I was afraid to talk to adults, but also to tell them they are doing something wrong since they are older than me. I also grew to be a risk-taker through the project. I took the risk of setting the final date of my project so close to my approval date. That was a risk because it was about a month to complete the library.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

STREAM Girls program in Longmont and Littleton

STREAM Girls

April 13, 2019- Longmont

May 11, 2019-  Littleton

$5/girl

Free for accompanying adult

STREAM Girls gives Girl Scouts the opportunity to earn a patch as they serve as citizen scientists, anglers, and artists, in order to build an appreciation for watershed conservation and the environment. This outdoor watershed experience employs STEM-education (science, technology, engineering, math) plus recreation and arts to explore a local stream.

Every person is a citizen of her watershed, and Colorado Trout Unlimited (TU) has partnered with Girl Scouts of Colorado so that girls will get the complete picture of what their stream could mean to them.

At this event, TU volunteers will lead Girl Scout Juniors and Cadettes in observing a stream, collecting flow data, sampling macroinvertebrates (aka aquatic bugs), fly tying, and fly casting. The day also gives girls time to explore the natural area and record their thoughts and observations in their handbooks. Each girl will receive a STREAM Girls patch at the end of the day.

Light snacks will be provided throughout the day and participants should bring a nut-free sack lunch with them. A detailed packing list, liability waiver for CO Trout Unlimited, and other pre-information will be provided for all participants via email two weeks before the event.

These are not a drop off events, all Girl Scouts must attend with a parent, guardian, or troop leader. Girls attending with a troop leader must complete a Parent Permission form for a Girl Scout Activity that troop leaders will retain for their records. Adult-to-girl ratios must be met for girls attending as a troop. Parents, guardians, and troop leaders will supervise girls and assist with activities as needed.

Capacity for each event is 24 Girl Scouts. Registration will close on Tuesday, April 2 for the April program, April 30 for the May program, OR when capacity has been reached.

Register online for April 13 in Longmont: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2019/stream_girls.html

Register online for May 11 in Littleton: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2019/stream_girls_2001653544.html

40963104_co_trout_unlimited_spring_2019_flyer

Power of cookie: Realizing her G.I.R.L. power

Submitted by Melinda Hess

Metro Denver

Littleton

Bella and Livie of Troop 65488 proved that hard work, dedication, organization, and excellent customer service are the keys to success! Bella’s brother fell ill and she was concerned she wouldn’t be able to fulfill her commitment to the booth and her Girl Scout sister, Livie. Her dad stepped in to help and Bella was thrilled, not only to feel safe, but to show the community that police officers love cookies too!

Bella has definitely shown and realized her G.I.R.L. power since joining her troop a year ago. She has learned, grown, and realized she can empower herself and others in many different ways and looking forward to the years ahead!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Daisy Deane, Littleton, “Mason Bee houses”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I built eight Mason Bee houses for the Carson Nature Center in Littleton. I also created a website with a map of the locations of the houses, more information onMason Bees, and instructions on how to build aMason Bee house.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

With the help of the Carson Nature Center, I created a sustainability plan that includes monthly counting of the holes that are filled in the bee houses, in order to see how many Mason Bees are utilizing them.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Mason Bee houses need very little outside maintenance, as the bees clean the holes themselves. The design of the houses are specifically attractive to Mason Bees, so every year they will return to lay their larva and the cycle of population and pollination with continue. The website allows people from all over to learn more about Mason Bees and even build their own houses for their communities, effectively spreading both awareness and population.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The website is available to anyone who has Internet access, and therefore people from all over the world can become aware of this species of bees and help foster the population. Furthermore, I reached out to several local, national, and international organizations, such as Planet Bee, and told them about my project and its impact on my community in the hopes that they would spread it as well.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I enjoy challenging myself and stepping out of my comfort zone. I was working with a group of people who were adults, so leading and delegating them was uncomfortable at first, but I learned that I can rise to challenges like these.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The experiences and skills I have attained are invaluable to me as I move forward in life and I will continue to use what I learned in the school and work environment. Skills like leadership, confidence, and even woodworking will benefit me in any environment and I am grateful I developed them throughout my Gold Award Project.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

A startlingly small statistic of Girl Scouts reach their Gold Award, so I think it is very  important that I persevered. I learned so much in my experience and I hope that I can inspire  other young Girl Scouts to continue in Girl Scouts. My Gold Award was important to my experience because it tied together everything I have learned and developed over the years and was the final task I needed in order to be ready for the world after high school.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award particularly helped me be a risk-taker. When I first began working with wood and older adults, I was totally out of my element and I wasn’t sure my idea would even be approved. However, I’m so glad I stepped out of my comfort zone and took those risks because it made earning my Gold Award so much more rewarding and satisfying.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Alice in Wonderland ballet performance

Submitted by Ali Jaramillo

Metro Denver

Littleton

Littleton Youth Ballet, the non-profit youth ballet company associated with Littleton Ballet Academy, will be presenting Alice in Wonderland. Performances are presented with beautiful backdrops, full sets, and costumes at Lone Tree Arts Center. Follow Alice down the rabbit hole as she encounters such characters as the White Rabbit, Mad Hatter, Cheshire Cat, and Queen of Hearts. This production is family friendly and is the perfect way to introduce your children to the ballet.

When:

Saturday, March 16, 2019 at 6 p.m.

Sunday, March 17 at 12 p.m. and 5 p.m.

Where:

Lone Tree Arts Center

10075 Commons St Lone Tree, CO 80124

Parking is free

Ticket prices range from $25 to $36 and can be purchased at www.littletonyouthballet.org or (720) 509-1000. ***DISCOUNT for a GROUP OF GIRL SCOUTS by calling Littleton Youth Ballet at 303-794-6694***

Littleton Youth Ballet is a non-profit youth ballet company designed to give the talented dancers at Littleton Ballet Academy more performance opportunities. Each year our dancers perform a Storybook ballet in the fall and spring, The Nutcracker in December, and a separate ballet performance in June. Our dancers also learn the value of community service by bringing dance into the Denver metro area through community outreaches. Dancers have placed in ballet competitions (including two first place awards at Denver Ballet Guild last year) and received numerous scholarships to prestigious summer ballet schools. This year there are 120 dancers taking part in Littleton Youth Ballet.

Littleton Youth Ballet is a performing ballet company comprised of 105 young dancers between the ages of 7 to 18. Our mission is to maintain a first-rate non-profit youth company of dancers, enriching their lives and those of their families, schools, communities, and beyond. We also aim to provide a caring and respectful environment that offers each dancer quality performance experience to enable them to reach their fullest potential, not only as dancers, but in all areas of life. We strive to encourage and promote dance with dynamic, full-length productions and diverse outreach programs throughout the Denver area.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Troop 2624 at My Own 2 Hands makerspace

Submitted by Trista Smith

Metro Denver

Littleton

The Girl Scouts of Troop 2624 came to My Own 2 Hands makerspace to earn their “Woodworking” badge! Together, they learned how to use many tools: hammer, screwdriver, drill, impact driver, level, handsaw, miter saw, clamps, and a nail gun! Using these newly learned skills, they were able to make picture frames. They each were able to make their frame unique and custom to their taste by using stain and paint. Each project turned out amazing!

The girls were able to work together as a team to help each other understand the tools. Though some were initially nervous with some of the power tools, others helped to encourage everyone to take a risk and do something they had never done before!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

TRY IT Days: Explore Like a G.I.R.L. – Columbine Library

You’ve heard about Girl Scouts – now try it for yourself!

Join us for an afternoon of sample activities from our new Girl Scout Space Science badges!

Are you new to Girl Scouts?

Please join us to learn all about what it means to be a Girl Scout, and the wonderful volunteer opportunities available. Inviting K-12th grade girls and an adult to learn more. New troops are forming today!

As a Girl Scout, your girl will practice leadership with grit like a go-getter, problem solve like an innovator, embrace challenges like a risk-taker, and show empathy like a leader—in an all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment where she can feel free to let her full, magnificent personality shine through every single time.

Are you a current Girl Scout member or volunteer?

You’re invited to complete hands-on activities toward your Space Science badge in the comfort of the library. Bring a friend or prospective volunteer to share the wonderful world of Girl Scouts!

To start your girls’ membership with Girl Scout of Colorado visit: www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/join