Tag Archives: Littleton

Silver Award Girl Scouts work to ban disposable plastic bags

Girl Scout Cadettes Ella M., Amanda B., Mia J., and Giana A. of Troop 62458 from the Columbine area in Littleton waited for more than FIVE HOURS on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 to talk once again with Jefferson County Commissioners about why they should ban the use of disposable plastic bags. The girls are working to earn the Girl Scout Silver Award, the highest honor for a Girl Scout Cadette and the second highest honor in Girl Scouting. Even though Commissioners told the Girl Scouts they will not implement the ban, these Girl Scouts aren’t giving up. They now plan to talk with business owners and the public to encourage everyone to stop using disposable plastic bags.

The Cadettes first brought their idea to Commissioners on July 31 and made the following statement:

In Colorado, we see plastic bags littering our rivers and highways, and in trees all over our parks. The plastic bags degrade into our rivers, lakes, and reservoirs polluting our water, therefore damaging our ecosystem.

In addition, disposable plastic bags make our groceries more expensive. Stores pay anywhere from $1 to $6,000 per month on disposable bags. The stores then add that cost into groceries and products. The average hidden cost of bags that consumers pay is $37.50 every year. Consumers use 100 billion plastic bags per year. More than 90% end up in landfills where they are not exposed to elements that would degrade them. We cannot let this go on any longer. Plastic bags continually block drainage systems and put poisons into the water supply. Many animals mistakenly eat plastic bags and as more animals eat each other, the pollutants go up the food chain, and eventually end up on our dinner tables. It’s time we take control of the environmental impact of our actions by getting rid of disposable plastic grocery bags.

Commissioners wanted to recognize the girls’ hard work and dedication, so they presented them with a special coin on behalf of Jefferson County.

The girls talked with Dan Daru of Fox31/KDVR-TV after the second meeting with Commissioners: https://bit.ly/2Pa3Jtv

On Tuesday, July 31, the girls were interviewed by Ashley Michels of Fox31/KDVR-TV: https://bit.ly/2OAvfAo

G.I.R.L.s collect school supplies to earn Bronze Award

Submitted by Melissa Holmberg

Metro Denver

Littleton

Girl Scout Junior Troop 1631 from Highlands Ranch, which has 14 girls, is currently working to earn their Bronze Award by collecting school supplies for low-resource students. The girls identified a need for school supplies an elementary school in Evans. Next, they reached out to schools in their own community, and asked to place boxes in the lobby to collect supplies.  A dozen schools agreed to participate, and the girls worked with the schools to publicize their project through posters, an e-newsletter to parents, and the schools’ announcements.

On July 12, 2018, the girls met to merge and sort the donated supplies. They include pencils, markers, glue, scissors, binders, paper, and books. Additionally, some of the girls reached out to Office Depot in Highlands Ranch, which agreed to place another collection box in the front of the store. The girls hope people buy and donate additional supplies on the spot. On August 12, the girls will deliver the donated supplies to Union Colony Elementary School in Evans.

Earlier this summer, the girls completed their biggest girl-led project yet! Many of the girls were in the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) as babies, or have overcome some sort of medical challenge, so when completing the “Agent of Change” Journey, they wanted to do something to help children and families in the NICU at UCHealth. The girls assembled 20 NICU Care Kits and delivered them to the hospital in June. The full story, along with a few photos and thank you letters from parents who received the kits, is here: https://bit.ly/2usUFXc.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too

Silver Award project: Plastic bag ban

Submitted by Girl Scout Cadette Troop 62458

Metro Denver

Littleton

We are Girl Scout Cadettes Ella M., Amanda B., Mia J.,  and Giana A. from the Columbine area in Littleton. As part of our project to earn our Silver Award, today (July 31, 2018), we proposed a ban on the use of disposable plastic bags in Jefferson County before the Jeffco Board of County Commissioners. In Colorado, we see plastic bags littering our rivers and highways, and in trees all over our parks. The plastic bags degrade into our rivers, lakes, and reservoirs polluting our water, therefore damaging our ecosystem.

In addition, disposable plastic bags make our groceries more expensive. Stores pay anywhere from $1 to $6,000 per month on disposable bags. The stores then add that cost into groceries and products. The average hidden cost of bags that consumers pay is $37.50 every year. Consumers use 100 billion plastic bags per year. More than 90% end up in landfills where they are not exposed to elements that would degrade them. We cannot let this go on any longer. Plastic bags continually block drainage systems and put poisons into the water supply. Many animals mistakenly eat plastic bags and as more animals eat each other, the pollutants go up the food chain, and eventually end up on our dinner tables. It’s time we take control of the environmental impact of our actions by getting rid of disposable plastic grocery bags.

On Tuesday, July 31, 2018, the girls were interviewed by Ashley Michels of Fox31/KDVR-TV. Use this link to watch the story. https://bit.ly/2OAvfAo

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too

 

Elitch Gardens patch contest winner

Congratulations to Brianna, a Girl Scout Junior from Littleton, for submitting the winning patch design for our Elitch Gardens patch contest! Brianna’s design will be featured on the event patch that will be given to each participating Girl Scout during our Girl Scout Days with Elitch Gardens July 27-29, 2018.

All Girl Scouts, friends, and family are invited to Girl Scout Days. Cost is $25.99/person. Tickets can be purchased at https://goo.gl/Ekz6Hx. Not able to make it? No problem. Elitch Gardens is offering a Girl Scout discount for a daily ticket all season long that can be purchased through the same link. A portion of all tickets sold will be donated back to GSCO.

Questions? Please contact Lori Thompson at lori.thompson@gscolorado.org. We hope to see you there!

Help needed: Constructing a solitary bee hotel at Denver Botanic Gardens-Chatfield Farms

Update as of June 25, 2018: Thanks to everyone that responded to Philip regarding the Solitary Bee Hotel project at Denver Botanic Gardens-Chatfield Farms in Littleton.  Philip received a lot of replies from interested Scout Leaders.  He’d like to limit the responses to the groups that have responded so far, and will begin contacting them with specifics for the project.  Thanks again!

Submitted by Philip Cuka

Metro Denver

Littleton

Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield Farms (DBG-CF) in South Littleton is interested in having a solitary bee hotel on site.  The hotel would serve as a nesting location for a variety of solitary bees, and other pollinators, which are needed for the variety of flowers and vegetables in the area.  The hotel will also serve as an educational piece for raising public awareness about the important role of pollinators in the food chain, and threats to their livelihood.

In late summer/fall 2018, the DBG-CF staff is planning to hold a volunteer event for creating individual solitary bee houses.  The houses will then be placed in the solitary bee hotel.  The event will be similar to last Fall’s event at Waterton Canyon (https://denverwatertap.org/2017/08/07/naturegoers-abuzz-new-bee-hotel/), and is being directed by some of the same members.

For this year’s event, the DBG-CF staff is looking for a Girl Scout or troop to assist with the construction of the bee hotel.  A design has already been decided on, and materials are being gathered by several groups.  The Girl Scout/troop would will have the opportunity to (learn to) use a variety of hand tools in the construction of the hotel.  No experience is necessary.  The construction of the hotel is currently planned for late July/early August.

For more information, please contact Philip Cuka at SolitaryBeeBandB@yahoo.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Hometown Hero donation to Colorado Parks and Wildlife game wardens

Submitted by Laura Hopkins

Metro Denver

Littleton

The Cadettes of Troop 60074 decided to make game wardens (wildlife officers) in the Colorado Parks and Wildlife division one their Hometown Heroes this year! Since most of the game wardens don’t work out of an office, the girls delivered the Girl Scout Cookies as a surprise during their monthly regional staff meeting. The game wardens were so happy to get cookies! Their supervisor told us that no one had ever given them cookies in the 14 years she’d been there! We were so glad the girls chose to give them some cookie love! The game wardens loved them back with goodie bags filled with stuffed animals in Colorado Parks and Wildlife t-shirts, prairie bird identification books, Colorado wildlife identification books, and calendars. It felt so great to pick some Hometown Heroes that don’t get much recognition!

The girls also donated cookies to the park rangers and volunteers at Barr Lake State Park, and the staff at the Colorado Parks and Wildlife SOLE (Schools & Outdoor Learning Environments) program. All these Hometown Heroes were great choices, especially since our troop is busy working on our “Outdoor” Journey!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

G.I.R.L.s build fence for Silver Award project

Submitted by Laura Smith

Metro Denver

Littleton

Over this last year, Troop 3227 planned, designed, and built a fence around a 30’x 60′ garden at Goddard Middle School in Littleton. This was no easy task! The six girls divided the tasks so they could meet with the school, finalize a design, get a supply list, work on getting donations from Home Depots, Lowes, and the Elks in Littleton, and then building the fence over two weekends with the help of their families and parents. The girls learned how to coordinate such a huge project with so many players and they learned how to use tools safely as they built the fence. It was hard work that paid off. This fence will last the school around 25-30 years and it’ll be a legacy the girls can be proud of passing on.

The six girls exemplified what being a G.I.R.L. means. They took on a project that was not easy to accomplish and their go-getting attitude helped them get there. The skills the girls learned will go a long way in helping cement their leadership, risk-taking, and innovation. It was amazing to see the girls grow over this last year as they worked on this project!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scouts deliver cookies to Buckley Air Force Base

Submitted by Cassie Aymami

Metro Denver

Littleton

On May 10, 2018, three Girl Scout troops from the Denver Metro region delivered more than 18,000 packages of Hometown Hero Girl Scout Cookies to military and personnel at Buckley Air Force Base in Aurora. While three troops helped with the delivery, the cookies themselves were donated by at least a dozen troops, including: 62589, 65412, 61281, 60900, 65486, 13461, 61414, 65478, 60238, 65431, 64522, and 61053. Some of the cookies will also be delivered to Military Family Assistance programs.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Laurie Stragand

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Laurie Stragand of Littleton in the Metro Denver region was nominated by her daughter as a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Laurie to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a volunteer first to help with the Brownie group in our troop.  They had a lot of girls and the leaders seemed stretched thin. I thought I could make a difference with the group my daughter was in.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

My volunteering started with the Brownies and during my daughter’s second Brownie year. I have continued being a leader during my daughter’s time as a Junior and will carry on as a Cadette leader. I became our troop cookie mom in 2014-15 and have served as our cookie mom every year since.  Last year, I also volunteered for the treasurer position. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Girl Scouts has given me a surprising benefit from being both cookie mom and treasurer; with both of these positions my skill with Excel has increased dramatically.  On a serious note, I have learned that you get out of Girl Scouting what you put into it and my daughter’s experience, along with the other girls, is better for my being actively involved.

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

I hope the girls have learned from me while helping them with the badges.  As second year Juniors, the girls worked in groups and presented a badge for the rest of the Junior group.  I hope this helps the girls learn to be more independent, purchase within a set budget, take the initiative to research and lead the badges, and practice public speaking skills to overcome the fear of presenting to a group.  I also hope my own daughter has personally learned that it may not be easy to volunteer but with the right group/troop support it can be very rewarding.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Before taking on the roles I have in our troop, I was not used to being out in front of people. I am very comfortable doing things in the background.  As TCM for a troop of over 50 girls, I have created spreadsheets for booths to account for physical sales and the new digital side, for planning the initial cookie order, organizing cookie pickup times, and to schedule the last day for cookie return/settlement.  Holding parents and girls accountable for money and the schedule forces you to be assertive to achieve a better outcome for the whole troop. 

As treasurer, I have tried to make sure all the leaders are repaid the money they spend for badges and supplies in a timely manner.  To do that, we had to raise our troop dues and explain why the increase was necessary.  I feel in a smaller single level troop that would have been much easier than explaining to the parents of 50 girls in a multi-level troop why we needed a 60% increase in troop dues to continue to provide and an excellent program without the volunteer leaders personally covering the fees and expenses.
Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Troop 60474 earns highest awards

Submitted by Cherie Piccone

Metro Denver

Littleton

In their quest for their Bronze and Silver Awards, the girls of Troop 60474 identified the need for a summer food bank for kids in their own community. The girls have always participated in community service projects at shelters by preparing and serving food. When planning for their award projects, they felt passionate about helping kids from their own community. They were shocked to learn that children from their own school struggled on weekends with access to food. The girls didn’t realize that without access to school breakfast/lunch programs during the weekend, the last meal low-resource children may have would be lunch on Friday until they returned to school on Monday morning. The girls were concerned about the obstacles these kids would face during the summer and decided to take action. They reached out to several food banks, but discovered limited resources during the summer and decided to create their own summer food bank.

With two Juniors and 11 Cadettes in the same troop, the girls broke off into smaller, more focused groups to make their goal a reality. Each small group addressed different aspects of establishing the food bank. For example, three girls were responsible for procuring sites for the food drives and organizing the sign-ups. Another small group was responsible for proper storage, sorting, and labeling of food. Another group was responsible for creating a well-balanced, weekly selection of foods. (i.e. three fruits, three veggies, three proteins). They also created a spreadsheet that organized what food, which families, and the dates. Another group worked with the procurement of the pick-up site and arranged the sign-up for weekly drop-offs.

They could partner with a local church to arrange for weekly drop-offs. It was important to the girls that the recipients and themselves remained anonymous. Because the church had limited space, the girls had to arrange for weekly drop-offs over the course of the whole summer. Not only were the families happy to have the weekly donations, they discovered that this church could help them longterm. Many of the families found another resource to help them. Because of this, their summer food bank continued to help these families even when school resumed.

As the leader for Troop 60476, it was difficult to take on the Bronze and Silver Awards with such a large and mixed level troop. I am confident that the work these young ladies completed made an impact in our community where needs are not always easily identified. I am amazed and proud of their accomplishments.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.