Tag Archives: literacy

Cadette Book Club: Ghosts, Spells, and Spirits- Just in Time for Halloween

Things are getting spooky in the town of St. Augustine. Our leading lady, 12-year-old Lucely Luna has completely accidentally, conjured malevolent forces forth from an old spell book. With the help of her best friend Syd, Grandma Babette, and Chunk the Cat, Lucely must try to save the town before time runs out. Fans of “Ghostbusters,” “Goonies,” and “Coco” will love this frightfully fun adventure. Sensitive readers beware, there are some scary sections.

Join Girl Scouts of Colorado staff on October 8, 2020 at 4 p.m. for Cadette Book Club as we discuss “Ghost Squad” by Claribel Ortega. Please read the book in its entirety before the book club and come prepared with your brilliant thoughts, poignant questions, and outstanding opinions.

Register Here: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2020/october_2020_cadette.html

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: “The Cat in the Hat” by Dr. Seuss Book Craft

 

This easy craft is perfect for younger Girl Scouts (or younger siblings) and is a great follow-up to reading “The Cat in the Hat” by Dr. Seuss.

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Materials needed:

  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • White paper or colored construction paper
  • Markers

If you don’t have construction paper, draw the shapes on white paper and color them.

You will need:

  • One Top hat
  • Three Red stripes for the hat
  • One Large circle for the face
  • Ears, nose, and whiskers

Glue red stripes on your hat. Glue your nose and whiskers on the cat’s face. Draw the eyes and mouth on the cat’s face.

Last step, glue the hat on your cat’s head and add his ears.

Now, you can embellish your cat. Give him some freckles. Can your cat balance a tea cup on his head?

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at home: “One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish” Craft

This easy craft is perfect for younger Girl Scouts (or younger siblings) and is a great follow-up to reading “One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish” by Dr. Seuss.

Materials Needed:

  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Pen/Pencil
  • White paper or colored construction paper (If you don’t have construction paper, shapes can be drawn on white paper and colored)
  • Markers

You will need:

  • One Red fish
  • One Blue fish
  • Fishbowl

Place fishbowl on paper and lightly outline opening. Decorate opening with plants and small rocks/gravel on bottom. Once decorations are finished, glue fishbowl in place.

Add/glue down your fish!

Alternative

Glue clear plastic (old sheet protector or baggie) over opening. When fishbowl is glued down, leave top open so fish can be taken out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Alex Lanucha, Divide, “City Above the Clouds Satellite Library”

What did you do for your project?

In my small community of Divide, the elementary schools have started to see preschoolers starting school lacking the six early literacy skills. These skills are said to be the starting base of what kids need to make them successful readers. A group of reading experts have determined that these six literacy skills are the building blocks for later success in reading and writing. Researchers have explained that kids who enter school with more of these skills better understood the information they receive in school. These skills include vocabulary; knowing the names of things; print motivation; a child’s interest in and enjoyment of a book, print awareness; learning that writing in English follows basic rules, narrative skills; being able to tell and understand a story, letter knowledge; learning that letters have names and are different from each other, and phonological awareness; the ability to hear and manipulate the smaller sounds in smaller words. With my satellite library, I hope to get kids interested in reading again and choose a book over a device. In hopes of this happening, there are many people who benefit from it. The schools benefit from the kids that come in knowing and/or having exposure to these key literacy skills. The parents benefit, having their kids get a jump start in school, and being eager about reading. But most importantly, kids benefit the most. They now have something that they love and no longer have to potentially struggle with school and feel like they are behind their peers. They will have the confidence to succeed in school and develop a life-long love of reading.

How did you measure the impact your project made on your target audience?

To measure the impact my project has made on the kids, I created a log sheet asking for their name, age, and how many books they took. This was an easy way for me to keep track of my project, but also making it fun for kids. The idea of the log came from the ideas of geocaching. In this case, they were getting books as their prizes. When I was younger, my brother and I got really interested in doing geocaching and it was always fun to see who the last poeple were to find it and how long ago they found it. This is something that I wanted to incoperate into my project to add to the fun.

How is your project sustainable? How will it continue to impact after your involvement?

The Rampart Library District, Community Partners of Teller County, and Summit Elementary have committed to sustaining books and filling the library. Every three months, a volunteer from one of these organizations has agreed to check on the library, rotate books, and fill if necessary. The Rampart Library District has agreed to incorporate it into different programs throughout the year such as their summer reading program. Community Partners will promote it through its different programs and resources. Summit Elementary will promote it through their literacy nights, as well as putting a flyer out for homeschoolers. All organizations have agreed to donate books to the library with Rampart Library primarily managing donations.

What did you learn about yourself?

This project pushed me way out of my comfort zone. I had to do some things that I have never been comfortable doing and take on something bigger than ever. I learned that I could do anything that I set my mind to even when things don’t go the way things are planned. Over the time it has taken me to complete this project, I have run into numerous things that have set me back and didn’t nearly go the way they were planned to go. But, that’s the thing about life, things rarely go smoothly or in a straight line. I think this project showed me the kind of leader I can be. I love helping people and making things better. I wanted to be able to inspire people about my passion and I was able to do that.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Something this project has taught me is how to take lead. We can’t always stand back and wait for someone else to take the lead and tell us what to do. I think one of the hardest parts of these projects was having to do everything on my own. There were a lot of roadblocks that were hit and it was up to me to get past them and enroll others to support. There was no one telling me what to do or how to fix things when they didn’t work out. Basically, I couldn’t have someone help me and hold my hand the entire way. I think this has helped grow my leadership skills immensely. I am no longer intimidated by adults and asking for support. I am okay with leading people that are older than me. For a long time, I have always been used to being told what I am supposed to do and following their leadership. This has helped me become a better leader. I can take this into my future and college. Additionally, this project has helped with my public speaking skills. I am a better public speaker because of the number of times I needed to get in front of people and groups to promote my project.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your girl scout experience?

I feel the the Gold Award was a huge key piece in my Girl Scout experience and my leadership skills as a whole. I will tell you it is not an easy task, but when you finally reach the end, you get to say that you made a mark that is huge. I wanted to make a mark on my community and leave something behind to better my community. My Gold Award taught me so much about myself and the world. It taught me that helping others was a huge part of what I valued in my life and I wanted to further that into college and eventually my career.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I became a G.I.R.L. in expanding every one of these skills- one of the biggest things being a go-getter. I learned that if you want something to happen or you want to see change happen, you can’t stand around and wait for it to happen. If you really want something to change you, have to be willing to step out of your comfort zone and take the risk. You have to be a go-getter and get what you want. There were a lot of roadblocks that stood in my way from making this project possible, but I learned very quiclky that I wasn’t going to let that stop me.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award candidate builds StoryWalk Trail

Over the past year, Girl Scout Gold Award candidate Avery H. has developed, planned, and constructed a StoryWalk Trail for the Town of Parker. It is permanently installed at McCabe Meadows, a nature trail located just off the Cherry Creek Trail. A StoryWalk Trail is a type of nature trail with signs installed along it, displaying the pages of a children’s book. A story can be read as the trail is walked.

“I pursued this project because it perfectly intertwined my love for both the outdoors and reading while also engaging children in my community. I wanted to be able to help other kids discover the love I have for books and nature,” Avery wrote.

Special thanks to Reporter Jeff Todd of CBS4/KCNC-TV in Denver for sharing  Avery’s story!

 

The Little Children That Could and their Teachers: Inspiring Children and Adults through my Gold Award

Submitted by Madeline F.

Metro Denver

Englewood

This past month, I was invited to participate in the CCIRA’s (Colorado Chapter of the International Reading Association) annual reading conference. More than 1,500 principals and teachers from all over Colorado came and went throughout this conference to learn how they can impact children’s lives through new reading and writing techniques. Their vision is that all people will be empowered to critically engage in our changing world by developing and utilizing literacy skills throughout life. As an advocate for reading and writing, I was very grateful that I got to share my Gold Award project to help CCIRA spread their message. At this conference, I got to create a display to show my Gold Award, as well as attend different sessions with authors who gave me new ideas to add to my project.

My Gold Award is a hands-on program to help children read more, learn from what they read, and inspire them to use the lessons they learn in their everyday lives. I used interactive games and activities to help children comprehend the book and also increase their love for reading. By showing how characters in books can be role models and by making their own books, I want children to gain confidence and excitement from reading and writing. With the knowledge they learn from this program, they can make an impact in their own communities. During this conference, I got to talk to several teachers, who had the same goal as I did, about this program. I talked with them about implementing my program in their classrooms because I saw an increase in popularity for reading sessions at the Boys and Girls Club. Sharing my display was really inspiring to me because it showed me that there are others with the same passion with whom I could share ideas. It also showed that I can take action in my community and spread a program that will impact a very common problem in our community.

To learn more about my project go to www.thelittlechildrenwhocould.weebly.com.

This event has helped me embrace being a G.I.R.L. Being a go-getter allowed me to talk to teachers about my project and my ideas. As an innovator, I was able to create a Gold Award project that inspired children to read more and use what they read to make a difference. Also, being a risk-taker caused me to come out of my shell and be confident about my project and my passions. Because I am a leader, I took the initiative to create innovative ideas and I shared them with the world so that the issue that I was passionate about can be reduced.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Spare a Book event

Submitted by Meredith Locke

Metro Denver

Lafayette

Come join us for bowling fun with your troop or family! We want everyone to have a good time and bring a book to donate. Literacy is important to all school age kids and should be accessible to them. The books you bring will be given to a local Title 1 school. Kids in these school don’t have as much access to what many other schools in the district have. Without exposure to the same materials, they won’t be quite as prepared to go into middle school and that may transfer to high school and the rest of their lives. With the help of everyone donating picture books and books for kids in second – fifth grades, we’ll be able to impact a few kids’ lives. This simple act of donating a book can help them tremendously. Helping people out is what our troop strives to do and you can help us help these kids advance and grow!

Please join us on March 17, 2019 for a great cause!

Time: 2 – 4 p.m.

Place: Chippers Lanes, 100 Nickel St, Broomfield, CO

Price: $15 per person + $2.50 for a specially designed patch

Please bring a picture book or chapter book for second – fifth graders (one per person)

To register, follow this link: https://bowling-party-event.cheddarup.com

Questions? Contact Meredith at mltlocke@gmail.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Madeline Ford, Englewood, “The Little Children Who Could”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Most children are uninterested in reading, so they lack the understanding of why reading is important. They do not like reading because they lack support and encouragement to read. Because of this, I created a program at the Boys and Girls Club that is a five-session literacy program to promote a positive reading environment by teaching books with good values and morals and then teaching the children about different authors and poets to show new ways to express themselves. I brought in several volunteers to create a small volunteer to child ratio, so children could get the attention they need to work on their reading skills. I also noticed that they do not like to read because it lacks physical activity, so I made hands-on activities to keep the children engaged and active. Afterwards, I created reading tool boxes that consist of 15 to 20 books and reusable activities that can be used alongside them. Through a book drive, I was able to collect more than 400 books that allowed me to make 22 tool boxes that were passed out to organizations that serve at risk children around Colorado. By encouraging a positive reading environment at an early age, children will develop a lifelong love for learning which will cause a positive impact in their future.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I created a survey the children filled out before and after the five-session program to get a sense of how they feel about reading. Overall, there was a 45% increase for the statement “Reading is Important” and an 18% increase for the question “Do I learn new things in my books?” Also, I interviewed the teachers from the Boys and Girls Club and they were very happy on how the program turned out. At that moment was when I felt like my project was coming together. I knew I had made a difference in a child’s life and that they learned ideas that will help them in the future. Seeing these results gave me motivation to write a program manual with all the activities so other children can be impacted as well.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The children of Godsman Elementary School brought home several projects that are reminders for the children to embrace themselves and show their best selves and to motivate them to read and write more. My school’s National Honor Society will continue my program using my step by step instruction manual in my school district so over one hundred children each year can experience this program.

I created 22 tool boxes that had 15 to 20 books inside of them with several comprehension activities from my five-session program to understand books better and gain excitement from them. They allow children who were unable to experience my five-session program to be able to try my activities and be inspired by them.

My five-session program and book tool boxes can be accessed on my website: www.thelittlechildrenwhocould.weebly.com

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Reading affects children everywhere. There are several reasons why children do not take reading seriously, which is why it is important to look at each reason and find a solution to fix it. I shared my project to several national organizations such as Reach Out and Read, National Honor Society, and the Boys and Girls Club. They can do my program anywhere and affect children around the nation. I put all of the materials and templates on a website that organizations could easily access to make the program successful and efficient.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned to embrace my creativity. Before my project, I was afraid to share my ideas because I believed no one would like them. However, having free reins on this project let me create whatever I wanted to promote reading literacy and I became very open with promoting ideas. I enjoyed bouncing off ideas with other people and receiving constructive criticism because it helped my ideas be more successful. I gained critical thinking skills that allowed me to create new and innovative ideas that made my project more appealing.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Working on this project helped increase my self-confidence. While working on this project, I began to branch out more in my community. As a result of this increase, I decided to apply for more leadership positions at my school. I became a board member for National Honor Society and Big Sisters and through these organizations, I am able to promote the values of this project to a bigger audience.  My Gold Award will always remind me that I take action and am able to create a better community.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was a perfect way to show my abilities and strengths that I developed through my years in Girl Scouts. Through Girl Scouts, I was able to create a stronger version of myself that pushed me to make my voice heard. Girls in a safe space gain confidence in themselves and they allow others to see their personalities and their abilities and I think that the Gold Award is a perfect way to challenge a girl in that way.  I gained knowledge and skills that will help me accomplish with any of my future endeavors.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning my Gold Award helped me become an innovator. I had to come up with new ways to keep children engaged and involved while reading and writing.  I talked to several literacy aides and teachers to learn more how children focus and with their help I was able to create an interactive project. I enjoyed bouncing off ideas with other people and receiving constructive criticism because it helped my ideas be more successful.  I gained critical thinking skills that allowed me to create new and innovative ideas that made my project more appealing.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Silver Award project: Free Little Library

For their Silver Award project, Girl Scouts from Troop 14013 Megan T. and Hailey T. in Grand Junction designed, built, and installed a Free Little Library at Lincoln Park. The girls love reading and wanted to share that love with their community. The library was immediately used by children and adults.

Mandy Beilman was at the girls’ event because she has been visiting Free Little Libraries around the country. GSCO asked her a few questions about her personal connection to Free Little Libraries.

When did you get started doing this?

I remember seeing Little Free Libraries in online articles, but never seeing one in person. I saw my first one in the summer of 2016 in Homer, Alaska. My family was there for a deep sea fishing trip and I spotted one with a mermaid on it. I swapped out the book I had brought along for the trip with a new read. After that, I started noticing them more places and being intentional about seeking them out.

Where have you experienced these?

In many places! I’ve visited several in Anchorage, AK, as well as the one in Homer. The farthest east I’ve gone is Topeka, KS. I plan to continue seeking them out whenever I got to a new place. My daughter and I like to take photos of them and I have an album on Facebook. My favorite ones so far are the ones that I find by accident. There’s a bit of magic in finding one and seeing what books it holds!

What is your interest in LFL?

I’m a high school English teacher, so literacy is important to me. I love the idea of giving out free books, it’s a great community service! Plus, I think the libraries are cute; I enjoy seeing all of the different styles. I can’t wait to put one in my front yard.  (As soon as I sign the closing papers on my first home).

What made you come to this one?

I saw the girls putting it together and thought I’d come over and visit! I’ve never been the first patron before, my daughter and I really enjoyed that.  The one the girls designed is beautiful, and it has a perfect location, right next to a park.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Emma Kerr, Monument, “Learning to Read, Enjoy, and Discover (READ)”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My Gold Award project included two components. One aspect of it was building a bookshelf/reading center, and collecting pillows for a corner at Lewis Palmer Elementary School. The purpose of this was to create an inviting book nook that would draw kids to literature. The second aspect of my project was a Read-A-Thon program at the same elementary school. With the help of LPES, I was able to involve over 300 students in a fun, competitive reading program. High school students volunteered their time by reading with/to students of all ages.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

After building and implementing the bookshelf in the library, I heard only positive comments from the librarian on the relationship between picking up a book and the new nook. Students were drawn by the comfortable pillows and funky bookshelf/reading center to go straight for a novel and curl up with it.

Through the numerous reading hours logged by the students from the Read-A-Thon, it was obvious that putting a fun twist on the idea of reading can encourage a student to pick up a book more often. The Read-A-Thon ended with computing the hours logged and providing students and classes with prizes for outstanding participation.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Lewis Palmer Elementary School has picked up the Read-A-Thon to continue with it beyond the initial year. The bookcase and pillows are both very substantial and will be reusable for years to come. They were handmade by many local women’s organizations in the Monument Community who were happy to help. The pillows have coverings so they can be washed and used for many years.

It is my hope that the students that participate in years to come have the same experience that these initial students were granted. The goal of the project is to create a more familiar relationship with reading and give students something that they can improve on for their personal benefit.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Beyond Lewis Palmer Elementary School, I am helping a high school in another area implement the same project at one of their feeder schools. They won’t be building a bookshelf/reading center, but through a simplified Read-A-Thon plan they can use high school volunteers to implement the program.

The amazing part of my project is that the group of children that will be impacted are those that still have their whole lives ahead of them. My goal was to focus on those still developing so that they can form and build upon reading skills – skills that can help in almost any area of learning or life skills.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I need to set written goals for myself in order to ensure things get done. I also learned that I really enjoy working with younger kids.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Reaching my Gold Award was a lot of hard work and required lots of determination. From this process I have acquired new skills in communication, project planning, and presentation. These will be useful in almost any area of my future.

Also, now I can say that I have my Gold Award! Which is a connection to thousands of other girls and also is an avenue to earn scholarships for college!

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

My Gold Award was the “cherry on top” for my experience with Girl Scouts. I have been a Girl Scout since I was six (And I am fortunate that it my leader has been the same my entire Girl Scout years!) and have always dreamed of reaching every level of scouting. I know this is marking the end for me being a member of a troop, but I will always be a Girl Scout. The morals of a strong work ethic and a compassionate heart I will retain forever and I can thank Girl Scouts for developing them into what they are today.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning my Gold Award has shaped me towards an innovative mindset. Now, I look around my community and instead of just seeing problems I also see possible solutions. I may not have combated the most pressing issue in my community, but I was passionate about it and that’s what made the process a whole lot more fun.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org