Tag Archives: Liberty High School

Gold Award Girl Scout: Brooke Eshbach, Colorado Springs, “Service Dog Training Aids”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award Project, I researched, designed, and built training aids for service dogs in training with an organization called Paw Pals Assistance Dogs (PPAD). PPAD specializes in training mobility dogs to help people in wheelchairs or with stability issues. There is a lack of advanced trainers in the program, so my training aid will assist puppy raisers in teaching advanced skills, and advanced trainers in focusing on specialized skills for the service dog recipients. My aid incorporates six training skills, is light weight and transportable, and will be used to develop the highest quality service dogs for people in need.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I was able to measure the impact of my project the first time I saw it in action! I took the training aids to a PPAD class and got to watch all the dogs and puppies work with the tool. Some were using the shelf and touching the light switches; others were opening the door and retrieving through the hole. It was exciting to listen to the trainers talk about plans for my aids in upcoming training sessions. At that time, I was able to imagine the global impact my training aid will have on service dogs, their trainers, and recipients around the world.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The training aids will be passed on to puppy raisers and advanced trainers for many years to come. Currently, there are PPAD advanced trainers in Colorado, California, and Florida. An electronic design/blueprint of the aid is available to be replicated in case of the wearing down of the aids or demand for more.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

PPAD has the blueprint of the training aid attached to its website. This makes it easy for other trainers within the Paw Pals organization, as well as other service dog training organizations, to find instruction on building an aid of their own. I created a YouTube video that is linked to the blueprint explaining how the training aid is to be used. Because of the widespread scope of the Internet, my training aid is available both nationally and globally.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I can lead a major project and accomplish it by an established deadline. I was able to build a great team with the skills needed, and to consider and accept others’ ideas and suggestions along the way. I learned I’m able to manage my time, prioritize, and overcome challenges.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Through the Gold Award experience, I became aware of how much support I have around me. I’m much more comfortable speaking in front of a group and teaching others. It also showed me how much my time and effort can affect others’ lives. The leadership skills required to lead a team and earn my Gold Award will stay with me for the rest of my life.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Earning my Gold Award brought together everything I have been learning in Girl Scouts such as leadership, teamwork, patience, determination, and success. It was a really big factor in continuing my Girl Scout journey throughout high school.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning my Gold Award made me an innovator. I took an original idea, designed and built it, and used it to make a difference in my community and the nation.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

 

 

 

Gold Award Girl Scout: Mackenzie Block, Colorado Springs, “Treasure Closets and Boredom Buster Kits”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a treasure closet and toy check-out system at the Ronald McDonald House to give residents a more positive and developmental atmosphere.  The pre-assembled kits directed towards different age groups in the treasure closet and gifts new residents receive, provide long term entertainment, comfort, and growth. These systems made the Ronald McDonald House more home-like to scared residents. I also painted the area with fish and marine life to display a kid-friendly under-the-sea feeling which gave immediate comfort to new residents.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The Ronald McDonald House has handed out 463 toys since my project began.  The kits are checked out daily.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is being sustained at the current Southern Colorado Springs Ronald McDonald House.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project is addressing the comfort of patients and the healthcare crisis currently happening in the United States, as millions are insecure with constant care and comfort in their daily lives. To reach others across the country, I had my advisor at the Ronald McDonald House send the brochure of my project to all RMH volunteer coordinators across the nation in order to show how this project made a big impact to her location.  My project is also currently being implemented into the new North Colorado Springs Ronald McDonald House and at TESSA, a battered women’s shelter in Colorado Springs.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned many things about myself and how to differently approach the world through my project. I had to think critically to overcome the storage issues in the treasure closet, as well as gained time management skills, and how to relate my time management skills to my team in order to complete the “construction” phase of my project.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award will continue to impact my life until I can no longer remember my project. I have proved to myself what I am capable of, and how to find and to address the needs of anyone and everyone I can.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I believe that the Gold Award was essential to my Girl Scout career, applying all the principles I had learned about from Daisies to Ambassadors. I also felt it necessary to give back to my community, and found that my Gold Award was the perfect opportunity.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My Gold Award has helped me become a go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, and a leader as I worked through my project. I became a leader on day one as I lead my team of over 20 people in order to complete my project. I became a go-getter on that same day as it was a huge leap of faith I was taking. Innovation was essential to the logistics and “construction” of my project and was gained as I worked through my project. I was a risk-taker through those innovations as well, using non-conventional solutions, proving myself a Gold Award recipient.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award: Cheyanne Bridges, Colorado Springs, “Cans can help”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I created a program within high schools. This program is both a recycling and donation program. The students’ empty soda cans and other aluminum cans are placed in the collection bins placed throughout the school. Once the collection bins are full (approximately every two weeks but differs for every school), a volunteer for the local animal shelter picks them up and brings them to the shelter. The animal shelter then recycles the aluminum cans for profit. I also created a program guide, educational posters, and wrote morning announcements to develop and implement the program.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The aluminum can profits will go directly to the Pikes Peak Humane Society Animal Medical Fund. In 2016, the shelter medicine expenses were $1,393,781. This amount includes $10,431 spay/neuter operations, emergency surgeries, and medical attention from cruelty and neglect cases. In 2013, the aluminum cans generated $7,573.30 for the Humane Society. Over a course of two weeks, the high school gathered $1.05 in aluminum cans. Within a year that will add up to $27.30 for the Animal Medical Fund.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Cans Can Help will be sustained at Liberty High School through the active participation and management of the student council class through an agreement made with the student council advisor. This class will continue to collect the aluminum cans and prepare them for pick up by a volunteer from the humane society at regular intervals.  The pick-up schedule is managed by communication between the humane society and student council management team. The student council will continue to promote my program by creating a class competition to paint the collection bins. The competition will bring awareness to the collection bins and hopefully decrease the amount of trash found in them. The competition will have an animal theme to promote the cause that the aluminum cans are for.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have created a program guide which was distributed to multiple schools in the community and in a different state. I have distributed my program guide to Rampart High School, Pine Creek High School, Air Academy High School, and Orange High School in North Carolina. I have distributed the program guide by email and presentation. I have emailed Pine Creek, Air Academy, and Orange High School. I have gotten a response from the building managers at Pine Creek and Air Academy. I have also gotten a response from my cousin from Orange High School. I presented my program guide to Rampart High School and have gotten a positive response in return.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I have a passion to pursue a college degree and career that helps animals. I also learned that I know a lot more about animals than I had previously thought. I learned that my leadership can help save animals in the future and the present. I’ve developed leadership skills such as communication and relationship skills.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The many presentations that I have conducted have strengthened my confidence and preparation skills and therefore will help my leadership skills in the future. These skills will help me in college and eventually in my career. This experience has changed me as a person by helping my confidence grow. It helped my confidence in presenting and confidence for making new friends. This experience has challenged me to ask for help. Asking for help has never been easy for me especially when it comes to academics or anything related to academics. However, this project has helped me see that asking for help isn’t as hard as I have always thought.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Earning a Gold Award is a perfect representation of my life in Girl Scouts. I believe my program is worthy of a Gold Award because it has helped me grow as a person and helped me realize more things about myself than I would have never seen. Earning this award also means a lot to me since it has helped me learn what I love most in this world. The Silver and Gold Awards introduced me to parts of the humane society I would have never been a part of without participating in these awards.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award project helped me become an innovator. I introduced a new program into a high school that links both the high school and local animal shelter and I innovated a way to make that program benefit the humane society with items high school students use every day and end up throwing away.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Jordan Wilson, Colorado Springs, “Operation Digital Divide”

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What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

For my project, I aimed to make senior citizens more connected with their communities through learning about technology in a safe, easy, fun, and cost-efficient manner. I created a website, Facebook page, and many print resources that were used for the education of seniors. Additionally, I presented to large and individual groups of seniors about creating and using Facebook and email. The website with all my materials and more is available at: https://sites.google.com/site/operationdigitaldivide/

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I initially began with a group of around 15 seniors, and due to my first group presentation many reported in surveys I had given them that their comfort and knowledge of technology increased to the point that many felt more secure and safe with their own Facebook pages and emails. Those who didn’t, I helped out individually to create Facebook pages and emails.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

My project is sustained through a working website and Facebook page containing all my project materials as well as a binder which is placed at the Palisades location and Union Printers Home, where my mom used to work and where I originally got the idea for my project. Additionally, Jennifer Richardson, who is located at the Palisades location, recently informed me of new renovations where a technology center will be available to residents and where she will help residents out with the help of my binder.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Because of the Facebook page and website attached to my project, senior centers around the country and globe can access my materials and use them to educate other senior citizens. I also have the manual I have made up there, so other senior centers can use it. You can find the website here: https://sites.google.com/site/operationdigitaldivide/

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned much more about perseverance and sticking with a project through it’s completion, even when I encounter struggles and have other things going on. I also learned how much I love interacting with people and being able to communicate and teach them.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Through my Gold Award, I discovered my own personal talent and passion for teaching others. That has since become the new direction I would like to take with my life, and my project really was the catalyst of all that.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

My Gold Award really took all the skills I’ve developed through Girl Scouting and put them to the test. Every leadership, communication, and problem solving skill I’ve gained through scouting was used in the process of completing my project and generally was a good summation of the work I’ve put into Girl Scouts.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org