Tag Archives: Lakewood

Accenture Hour of Code event

Submitted by Kari Sue Tornow

Metro Denver

Denver

We live in a world surrounded by technology. And, we know that whatever field our children choose to go into as adults, their ability to succeed will increasingly depend on understanding how technology works.

In celebration of Code.org’s global Hour of Code event, you and your family are invited to join Accenture and mindSpark on Friday, December 6, 2019 for a night filled with engaging STEM activities, from an hour of coding to experimenting with robots, drones, and electronic boards to the chance to win robots and exciting books. It will be a night your family won’t want to miss!

When: December 6, 2019

Where:

mindSpark Learning

455 S. Pierce St., Lakewood 80226

Time: 

5:30– 8:30 p.m.

Dinner will be served!

Don’t delay! Join in on the fun and get your family registered here!: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScqNAJehXCiisPXubQir4-j1Owwrio5rwV3UjDOAE0jFYpjVw/viewform

Click here to try one of the tutorials and for more information: http://hourofcode.com/us

I was a Girl Scout for more than 12 years, way before STEM was around, but Girl Scouts gave me the confidence to succeed in the male-dominated computer industry for more than 35 years.

Now, I share my knowledge and reach out to help girls and young women to dip into the world of computers.

This is an international event and we are very excited to bring it to Denver/Lakewood.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Abby Kennedy, Lakewood, “Band Buddies Music Mentorship”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my project, I created a program where Lakewood High School students go to local elementary schools once a week to work with the elementary school band students on their instruments. In these after school mentoring sessions, the high schoolers work with elementary schoolers who play instruments in the same family (brass, woodwinds, etc.). The aim of this was to help the elementary schoolers improve more rapidly to show them the benefits of music and how rewarding it is to play an instrument, to ultimately increase the likelihood that the would continue with music into middle school and high school. In order to make this project long lasting and to spread it, I created a basic curriculum, as well as a website to both share my project and provide a framework for future students in my school to continue the project.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The main component of my measurability was a survey for the elementary school students asking if they planned on continuing with band into middle school taken at the beginning and end of the tutoring program last year. In the initial survey, only half the kids were sure that they would continue, while by the final survey all of them were sure they would continue, which was a great success. I also made qualitative observations about the student’s general attitude towards the program and music, as well as their skills throughout the year, and they all ended more excited about music and better at their instruments.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

At the level of my school, I am working with students who are currently tutors and underclassmen so that they can take over when I graduate at the end of this year. I am providing my school with instructions on how to run the program, to make sure the core ideals and basic method of running the program don’t get lost over time. My advisor, the band director of the elementary schools in my area, has also stated that he is dedicated to keeping the program running as well. He will be a key component in sustaining the program at my school for years to come, being a constant as kids come into and graduate from high school. On a larger scale, my program will live on through my website and the instructional resource I created to help guide others to start and run programs in their own areas, which I am sharing with other students who are passionate about music.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project is based on a topic that people is applicable to anywhere in the world in addressing music and music education. This is dealt with on all sorts of levels depending on the country and area you consider. Some countries in Europe have subsidized arts programs, while this varies a lot throughout the United States., and then some underdeveloped countries rely on outside organizations to bring in any music education at all. With this, I helped to address music education as it was most applicable to my area. In order to expand my project to a global scale, I reached out to Tri-M Music Honor Society, an organization with more than 6,000 chapters of dedicated music students globally, about publishing a link to my website and curriculum on their website as a potential service project idea. This would apply my project to students all over the globe, and I am eager to keep working on establishing this connection.

What did you learn about yourself?

I am a reserved and shy person, and I have never been super comfortable putting myself out there, public speaking, and working with new people. Going into this project, this made me very unsure of my ability to be a leader and a teacher. Throughout this process, I have found myself facing and conquering these obstacles, showing myself that I am capable of both leading and teaching, as well as overcoming my fears.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

As I go into college next year, the skills I acquired in terms of leadership, communication, and working with new people will be incredibly important. From becoming practiced at reaching out to new people who could potentially help my cause, to figuring out how to lead a team, these are all skills I can use for the rest of my life. I am certain that I would have not gained these skills had I not completed this project, and I am grateful to have these skills to help me succeed in the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Having been a Girl Scout since kindergarten, the Gold Award has been a valuable experience in wrapping up my time as an active member of Girl Scouts, as I graduate from high school this year. The project combined many things I had learned through Girl Scouts throughout the years, and with this I think the Gold Award was a remarkable opportunity to enact everything my Girl Scout experience gave me. Overall, the Gold Award has in many ways been the culmination of the Girl Scout career, solidifying and amplifying everything I have learned since I began 13 years ago.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Completing my Gold Award has definitely helped me become more of a go-getter. Having faced many obstacles, tried many solutions, and accepted a few instances of failure with my project, I am much more open to trying new things and tackling a situation head-on. I am less afraid of facing obstacles and can focus on working towards solving an issue, instead of focusing on how an idea could fail even if it has great potential for success. This has made me much more willing to go for something even if I have inhibitions, hence more of a “go-getter.”

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Taylor Sich, Lakewood, “H.O.P.E.” (Hold On, Pain Ends)

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I created “H.O.P.E” (Hold On, Pain Ends) for teenagers who need help with suicidal thoughts and need support. I also established many peer-facilitated groups at school, as well as created a website for parents and children to find resources and read about the stories of others that are going through the same thing as they are.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

While the project is new, I was able to talk to the leaders of the groups to see about the attendance rate of each of them. I have received feedback from outside sources about the groups and parents being glad that the groups are available. I also established analytics for the website I created.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is being sustained by the counseling centers in the schools that are committed to keeping H.O.P.E. alive. In addition, the local businesses who have placed my posters in their businesses continue to drive people to my website, where additional information can be found.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project has been shared through social media, as well as the resources I have met with, including the CEO of Centura Health, which is connected to 14 hospitals.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I am stronger than I thought. I was able to overcome obstacles. I was able to grow emotionally and I learned how to be more sympathetic. I learned people skills, who to talk to, and how to truly understand someone.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I think that earning my Gold Award will help in many ways. Not only is it very beneficial for me to be able to put on my resumé and scholarship applications, it will also help me inspire others. I tackled a huge challenge and helped others while doing it, which I will forever enjoy sharing with younger Girl Scouts.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think that my Gold Award was the cherry on top. I was in Girl Scouts for 13 years and I did everything I could, from Journeys to earning my Bronze and Silver Awards, now my Gold Award.  It was the perfect way to close a chapter that was so large in my life.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I think that my Gold Award made me a risk-taker. I am different than I was before. I will now pick up the phone and talk to someone who I would have been too nervous to talk to before.  And lastly, I will try, try more than I ever did before, to meet every challenge, regardless if I may fail.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Celebrate Juliette Gordon Low’s birthday with a skate party

Submitted by Michelle Pierce

Metro Denver

Lakewood

Girl Scouts of all ages, plus guests, are invited to join us as we celebrate Girl Scouts founder Juliette Gordon Low’s birthday at Roller City Skating Rink!

When: Tuesday, October 29, 2019 5 – 8 p.m.

Where: Roller City: 6803 W Alameda Ave, Lakewood 80226

Cost: $10 per skater

Prepay by Monday, October 27. Venmo money to @Kim-Dillard-12 or send checks to Rosewood Service Unit (13050 W. Cedar Dr. Apt. 50 Lakewood 80228). In memo put names first and last initial, so we can validate they have paid when they arrive.

Sponsored by Rosewood Service Unit #632 for the Metro Denver region

Pizza and cake will be provided at no extra charge. Other food or drink items may be purchased through Roller City.

This is not a drop off event. All Girl Scouts must attend with a parent, guardian, or troop leader.

Questions? Email unitmanager@rosewoodsu.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scouts build and test roller coaster cars with the LEGO Group

17 Girl Scout Daisies had the unique opportunity to build and test an awesome roller coaster car and ramp with the LEGO Group at Colorado Mills Mall in Lakewood on  Sunday, September 15, 2019! With the help of parents, caregivers, troop leaders, and LEGO Store employees, these Daisies learned about mechanical engineering and motion. Girls also explored how roller coasters work by designing, building, and testing their cars. As part of the event, the girls got to keep their LEGO cars and even earned their “Daisy Roller Coaster Design Challenge” badge. This event is all thanks to a national partnership between the LEGO Group and Girl Scouts of the USA! GSCO hopes to offer more events like this in the future.

A special thanks to CBS Denver who joined GSCO for the event and shared the story with their viewers!

Xcel Energy Day of Service

More than 100 Girl Scouts, including Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, and Cadettes, along with their troop leaders and parents, joined GSCO and Xcel Energy employees on Saturday, September 7, 2019 for Xcel Energy’s annual Day of Service. Girls learned important lessons about energy safety; built solar-powered cars and took them for a test-drive; and made cards for veterans. All Girl Scouts also earned a special “Utility Safety Ambassador” patch from Xcel Energy and the activities they completed can also help them earn their next badge.

Thanks again to Xcel Energy for hosting Girl Scouts for this great event! We are already looking forward to next year.

Troop 65455 Girl Scout Kickoff Meeting – Kendrick Lake Park

K-7th grade girls and their families are invited to learn more about what it means to be a Girl Scout in Troop 65455 at our Kickoff Meeting. We will share information about our plans for the upcoming year, introduce our troop leaders, and help new families register to join our troop. Troop 65455 is building girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place through hands-on, outdoor, out-of-the-ordinary activities.

 

Girl Scouts is a place where your girl is free to try new things and just be herself! As a Girl Scout, your girl will practice leadership with grit like a go-getter, problem solve like an innovator, embrace challenges like a risk-taker, and show empathy like a leader—in an all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment where she can feel free to let her full, magnificent personality shine through every single time. And now there’s even more to explore, with new badges in robotics, outdoor adventuring, cybersecurity, and environmental stewardship—to name just a few!

 

Learn more and meet our troop on Tuesday, September 10th from 6:00 P.M. – 7:15 P.M. at Kendrick Lake Park located at 9351 W Jewell Ave, Lakewood, CO 80232.

Xcel Energy Day of Service

Girl Scouts in grades K-6 are invited to spend the morning with Xcel Energy employees to unravel energy mysteries and work on requirements for energy badges. Xcel Energy Day of Service is Saturday, September 7, 2019 from 8 – 11 a.m. at the  Xcel Energy – Kipling Service Center in Lakewood. During the morning, you will also participate in a service project as a way to help others in your community. It will be a special day of learning and caring, designed just for Girl Scouts.

Register now! https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2019/xcel_energy_day_of_s.html. Please make sure to click “Girl Scout Registration” to sign up to participate.

All Girl Scouts will receive their “Utility Safety Ambassador” patch from Xcel Energy.

Girl Scouts in grades 6 and up are also welcome to attend, but content is aimed toward a younger audience.

Build-a-Roller-Coaster adventure: Design challenge for Daisies with LEGO

UPDATE AS OF AUGUST 1, 2019: THIS EVENT IS FULL.

Girl Scouts of Colorado invites 15 Girl Scout Daisies to come build an awesome roller coaster car and ramp with LEGO Bricks! Your Girl Scout Daisy will explore learning through play as she builds, tests, and races her very own roller coaster car and ramp with a team of Daisy friends to support her every step of the way! She’ll even earn an awesome “Daisy Roller Coaster Design Challenge” badge to fuel her growing sense of skill-building, goal-crushing, barrier-breaking Girl Scout pride—SWEET.

Sunday, September 15, 2019

LEGO Store

Colorado Mills

14500 W Colfax Ave #482

Lakewood, CO 80401

Event time: 9:45 – 11:00 a.m.

Cost: FREE

Please note the following for this special event:

  • Capacity is limited to 15 Girl Scout Daisies and four parents/guardians/troop leaders.
  • All Girl Scouts who sign up must have renewed their Girl Scout membership for the 2019 – 2020 membership year. Haven’t renewed yet? That’s OK! Sign your girls up for another year of unmatched fun and adventure with Girl Scouts NOW!
  • Registration will close on Tuesday, August 13 OR when capacity is met.
  • Do not register Girl Scouts unless you know they are able to attend this event.
  • Each girl will be required to submit a signed parent permission form (with emergency contact information), GSUSA photo release, LEGO photo release, and LEGO in-store liability waiver. Forms will be emailed out prior to the event and must be returned via email by 5 p.m. on August 16.

To register, email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org with the information listed below for each individual Girl Scout Daisy. Do not register Girl Scouts unless you know they are able to attend this event.

  • Parent/caregiver first name
  • Parent/caregiver last name
  • Email address
  • Zip code
  • Girl Scout Daisy’s first name
  • Girl Scout Daisy’s lase name
  • Girl Scout Daisy grade

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org

 

Girl Scouts celebrate 15th anniversary of Yule Marble Initiative

2019 marks 15 years since Girl Scout Troop 60357 of Lakewood petitioned state lawmakers to designate the Yule Marble as the Official State Rock of Colorado. The girls embarked on the project to make Colorado the most geologically patriotic state in the union, with red, white, and blue geologic symbols (mineral: http://bit.ly/2HuK7P2, rock: http://bit.ly/2EmmZjW, and gemstone: http://bit.ly/2M1Ysqv). The project also enabled them to earn the Girl Scout Bronze Award, the highest honor for fourth and fifth grade Girl Scouts.

Now, Girl Scout alumnae are reflecting on what the project meant to them and the impact Girl Scouts has had on their lives.

“Now, in 2019 looking back over the last 15 years, I realize that this project did more for me as an adult than I ever could have imagined.”

“It’s pretty awesome to say that I was part of a group of young, ambitious women that took on the seemingly impossible and succeeded.”

MiKayla Loseke

“The most important lesson I learned from all this hard work is you can achieve anything you   put your mind to. A group of young girls with the help of a few very strong women were able to pass a bill into law in the state of Colorado. We weren’t experienced in the way governments work. We had no idea what we were doing. (The help we received from Senator Betty Boyd was incredible, we wouldn’t have been able to do it without her.)”

“I learned to be proud of my accomplishments. Our troop is going to be a part of Colorado’s history forever, and having that accomplishment, knowing that I was part of something great, gives me the courage to continue doing great things.”

Laura Eckhardt 

“The Yule Marble Initiative gave me a sense of hope for my own life and for the lives of those around me. My 12-year-old self was bold enough to go in front of a room of politicians and tell them that ‘even the smallest citizen can have a voice,’ and what was amazing was that those intimidating politicians listened and also agreed with us. What an empowering feeling for a bunch of pre-teens! I try to carry that feeling with me throughout my life and let it be a reminder when I doubt myself or the world around me, that change is possible and even the smallest, most seemingly insignificant of us are capable of making great changes in the world around us. That gives me hope.”

Emily Cameron

“I like to use this event as an example when I am working with fourth and fifth graders who are just starting to want to make their marks on the world. I share with them that a group of kids just like them, from their own neighborhoods, were able to make such a large and lasting change in their community, and that if they see a need, they too can reach out and do something about it.”

“Yule marble has become so much more than our Bronze Award project, it laid the foundation for the kind of people we grew up to be, and the kind of power we all have to make a difference in our world. If a bunch of little girls can change their world and make it just a little bit better, imagine what the rest of us can do if we set our minds to it.”

Caitlin Corenblith