Tag Archives: Lakewood

Volunteer Spotlight: Linda Fuller, MCC member

I joined Girl Scouts as a snaggle-toothed second grade Brownie (which was the age at which Girl Scouting began, back in the olden days of the early ‘60’s).  I’m not aware of any burning desire to be a Girl Scout.  At the time, there were few after-school activities and perhaps, my mother was glad to have me participate in one of them.  But, oh what a difference it made in my life!  Girl Scouting provided consistency and a safe place from a chaotic home life.  We moved a fair amount and I could always count on Girl Scouts to provide me an opportunity for new friends and adventures.  And soon after I relocated to Colorado with my husband and children, signing up as a Girl Scout allowed me to make friends quickly.  After nearly 30 years in Colorado, my friends are mostly Girl Scouts, with whom I gather, meet and greet, and travel.  Retiring from the staff of the former Mile Hi Legacy Council ten years ago, I continue to lunch with my former colleagues.  Now, who else can claim such a long-lived, inspiring network of former co-workers as friends?

I was retired, however, not willing to be left out of the loop of Girl Scout doings, hence my interest in the Membership Connection Committee (MCC).  What’s kept me involved with the MCC for the last 10 years?  Kept in the loop, indeed, with an understanding of the current direction and efforts of Girl Scouts in Colorado.  Able to make a small contribution on matters of governance and membership.  Meeting other Girl Scouts, girls and adults, with a responsibility to inspire, educate, and support.  My term will soon come to an end and I hope I’ll be welcomed back after the required hiatus.

I’ve served as a troop leader, trainer, service unit manager, event organizer, and now board member in my nearly 50 years of Girl Scouting.  I’m a Lifetime Member of GSUSA.  I currently support two troops and continue to train in leadership and outdoor skills.  Serving as an MCC member gives me a great deal of satisfaction since it allows me to share my skills and opinions in ways that influence the future of our organization and our members.  I have two sons [“huge, handsome and handy”, former Boy Scouts and “Girl Scout boys (until they became too distracting at Girl Scout events)”] and had, at one time, 26,000 ‘daughters’.  A terrific experience that enriched my world, provided me with adventures (around the state, the USA and the world) and made me a better person, trying to live by the Promise and Law.  Through my mentoring of young Girl Scouts, I know I’ve made a difference and that feels good.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is lucky to have a unique governance system with the Membership Connection Committee as the centerpiece of our democratic process and a way to give our members a strong voice in the issues they care most about. Would you like to be a voice for Girl Scouts of Colorado? Speak up and contribute our success together! To reach the MCC, e-mail GSCO.MCC@gscolorado.org

 

60 years of Girl Scouting with Edna “Skipper” Hollis

Submitted by Ann Thacker

Metro Denver

Lakewood

Edna “Skipper” Hollis led Girl Scout Troop 362 during my growing-up years. Who knew she would still be leading us, as adults, 60 years later?

Troop 362 was a big troop with three different age-groups. I was in the middle. That was nearly 60 years ago. And, we’ve kept in touch all those years… reuniting the last Saturday of every July at Skipper’s rustic cabin on the shores of Lake Eldora. She left this place on Thanksgiving 2016 at 104 ½ years old. As we gather at the cabin for one last time, we reminisce and bask in her love. She was a remarkable woman whom I deeply loved and admired.

Her energy was limitless. Even though she was nearing 50 back then, she taught us to: swim, canoe, hike, snowshoe, mountain climb, toboggan, ice skate, and chop ice from a deeply encrusted mountain spring. We learned to dip our buckets in the cold, clear water for drinking and bathing. She filled our days and nights with songs, swimming, cooking on a wood-burning stove, wildflower hikes, bird walks, campfires, and scary stories that went “boo” in the night.

She demonstrated kindness, compassion, unconditional love, and even taught us to “date young men.” To this day, my best date was the one she arranged for us (and chaperoned) with Air Force Academy Cadets. She showed us nature in its authentic purity, tender beauty, raw power, and rugged grandeur…all the while keeping us safe and secure.

More than anyone I’ve known, she trusted the goodness and abundance of life. Knowing that nature is God-made-manifest, she revealed a natural world, full of miracles that live forever in my heart and imagination.

Because of her, I remember to pause and drink in a sparkling dew drop, or inhale the scent of a soft, pink rose. I hug trees, speak to crickets, and sing duets with meadowlarks. I stand tall when lightning splits the clouds and thunder rolls. And all the while, I feel her presence, sense of wonder, and joy; as I take in the awe of each moment.

She embodied all that is good and continually expressed gratitude for life itself. She stood as a pure reflection of the divine, an illuminated mirror in which we could see our own souls.

How intimately she knew and loved the One Creator! And, how generously she loved each of us!!! I’m profoundly grateful for the privilege of opening the gift that she was… and I celebrate her; for she enriched my life.

Thank you, Skipper, for being who you are… a blessing to us all!

Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to celebrate the legacy of one of our most cherished alumnae, Edna “Skipper” Hollis. In 2016, Skipper passed away at the age of 104, leaving a 94-year history of Girl Scouting as a girl and an adult volunteer.  Skipper touched the lives of hundreds of girls, families, and volunteers and will be remembered for her love of the outdoors and the annual troop gathering she hosted at her Colorado cabin for more than six decades.

To make a gift in honor of Skipper, which will support opportunity grants to ensure any girl is able to attend camp, or  to honor an alum who has made a difference in your life, go to the Girl Scouts of Colorado website: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/support-us/alumnae.html 

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

A Girl Scout Memory for Edna “Skipper” Hollis

Submitted by Ann Thacker

Metro Denver

Lakewood

Remember the little women
in a one-room cabin
in winter
learning cooking
on a wood-burning stove?

Every morning
a sleepy Jill
would climb the hill
for buckets of well-water
to wash the fog
of dreaming
from her shining face —
And the days were full of discovery.

With ink of night
spilling across the sun,
the magic of snowdrift slides
and ice skates on the long black lake
grew dim
as tired giggling Girl Scouts
followed the reflections of stars
in the snowshoe paths toward home
to fall in a joyous heap
around the cabin fire.

Later, with the dishes clean
and bedrolls spread,
Skipper would lead them
in song
then soon to sleep
secure within the Sandman’s hand
and a scout leader’s love.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to celebrate the legacy of one of our most cherished alumnae, Edna “Skipper” Hollis. In 2016, Skipper passed away at the age of 104, leaving a 94-year history of Girl Scouting as a girl and an adult volunteer.  Skipper touched the lives of hundreds of girls, families, and volunteers and will be remembered for her love of the outdoors and the annual troop gathering she hosted at her Colorado cabin for more than six decades.

To make a gift in honor of Skipper, which will support opportunity grants to ensure any girl is able to attend camp, or  to honor an alum who has made a difference in your life, go to the Girl Scouts of Colorado website: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/support-us/alumnae.html 

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Cookie money has awesome rewards

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Submitted by Kathi Agnes

Metro Denver

Lakewood

Troop 942 sold 5,000 packages of Girl Scout Cookies this year. We used the cookie money for fun and for good! We have so many animal lovers in the troop, we decided to go hang out with them. We went to Cheyenne Mountain Zoo as a troop for their Wild Night. We had an educational zoo tour, which included feeding the giraffes. We learned how zoos across the U.S. work together to protect animals.  We have an awesome troop!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scouts receive Youth Heroes award from Red Cross

Congratulations to Senior Girl Scouts Haley Bolen of Denver and Annabelle Schaeffer of Lakewood! They received the Youth Heroes award from the American Red Cross Mile High Area. Haley and Annabelle were among seven local heroes recognized at the organization’s 2017 Heroes Soiree event on March 10. The Heroes Soiree is an annual event to celebrate the community and honor local heroes and first responders.

During a camping trip at Sky High Ranch in Woodland Park, Haley used skills which she learned during her week-long Red Cross babysitting course previously this year, to recognize the signs of a stroke and inform the parent volunteers at the camp what the emergency was. Haley recited the FAST rules to the parents and told them the Girl Scout leader was having a stroke. Haley’s quick thinking and fast action helped to save a life that day. Once the EMTs arrived, Haley assisted in giving information of symptoms to the medics. Annabelle was also instrumental in assisting Haley, and gave the emergency information needed to notify the leaders’ family of her condition and the hospital she was being taken to. These young ladies showed great lifesaving skills by keeping everyone calm, not panicking, and knowing what to do in an emergency.

Photos from the 2017 event can be found here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/redcrossmilehighchapter/albums/72157676703776674

 

 

Lakewood troop delivers cookies to Fire Station

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Submitted by Michelle Tellez

Lakewood

Denver Metro

Troop 66460 delivered almost 4 dozen boxes of cookies to our heroes at West Metro Fire Station #10. We toured their station last fall and learned a lot about fire safety, types of trucks and what fire fighters do to help people who have emergencies.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Christina Bear, Golden, “Project S.T.E.M. Student Mentors”

Christina Bear pic

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I initiated a S.T.E.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) introduction course for minority students at the Horizons Summer Program, a non-profit enrichment summer program, at Colorado Academy. I taught 3rd grade minority students Scratch programming for games and animations, Robot construction/programming, and mini-science experiments.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

In the United States, there is a shortage of minorities in S.T.E.M. education and careers. The goals of my Gold Award project were two-fold:

  1. To introduce minority children to S.T.E.M. topics, specifically technology and computer programming.
  2. To explore the role of high school students as S.T.E.M. Mentors for elementary school students.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

With pre- and post-questionnaires, the students reported a two-point increase on a five point scale for their ability to program a game, how to program a drawing pen, and their ability to make and program a robot. It is my hope that the students I taught have access to further enrichment throughout their schooling and to develop positive attitudes to S.T.E.M. education and careers. I wanted to leave a legacy for my school and for my community in developing Project S.T.E.M. Student Mentors. As a result of the project, Horizons Summer Program is working to incorporate S.T.E.M. into their yearly summer program curriculum, both locally and nationally.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I learned valuable life-skills of collaboration with my mentors and with experts in the S.T.E.M. field which enhanced my communication skills. Time management of juggling my Gold Award project, my academics, and sports sharpened my organization skills. I learned confidence and the value of preparation in planning the course. I had to use emotional intelligence skills of interfacing with diverse cultures, genders, and races and learned to appreciate diversity and inclusivity in my school and community.

How did you make your project sustainable?

I developed a web site (www.projectstemstudentmentors.com) and compiled an in-depth manual to guide future high school S.T.E.M. student mentors desiring to pursue this project. There are many S.T.E.M. volunteers, but most are adults. This project is unique because it encompasses a mutually beneficial guiding and teaching relationship of high school students and elementary students. I obtained a Proclamation from Governor John Hickenlooper proclaiming January 2015 as S.T.E.M. mentoring month. I donated $500.00 from my prior scholarship awards to cover future expenses for science experiments, instruction guides, posters, and folders. This donation is intended for Horizons to continue my vision for S.T.E.M. enrichment for minority students for at least the next five years.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

My project addresses a national problem, which specifically is a lack of adequate graduates in S.T.E.M. fields needed to maintain America’s economic success and national security. An aim of my project was to help lessen the achievement gap and S.T.E.M. disparities all across the United States for race, gender, and socioeconomic status. From a global perspective, a diverse work force in S.T.E.M. leads to creativity and collaboration, which ultimately leads to innovation.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

Three things come to mind. I discovered the scope of my project was too large when I initially planned it. Focusing on a smaller slice helped to contain the project and make it impactful. I also learned the impact in a project to create change in my community can be measured objectively (via questionnaires) and subjectively (teacher commendation). Lastly, the challenge of making a project sustainable is subject to many variables and therefore an in-depth manual and web site are reasonable methods for sustainability.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

The leadership skills I learned of collaboration, time management, adaptability, and inclusivity will help me to manage future projects with resilience and confidence. Knowing that I can scale a project to a small slice and still be a change agent for something I believe in is empowering. After reflecting on the impact of my pilot project, I envision scaling up the project for greater utility in S.T.E.M. mentorship. The process of the Gold Award, with the guidance of dedicated and nurturing mentors, has taught me to communicate with respect and accountability. I am grateful to the Girl Scouts of Colorado for inspiring me to become a leader in my community.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award teaches valuable concepts of impact and sustainability that are not usually a part of projects that I do. As a result, I believe I can create lasting change that can improve my community. My coming of age has been dramatically and positively affected by the responsibilities required to complete a Gold Award. Most importantly, the Gold Award unexpectedly helped me to establish a lasting legacy to my school and community.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Heidi Hufford, Lakewood, “Heidi’s Dresses for Haiti”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I made and organized others to make pillowcase dresses and collected underwear for girls living in tent cities in Haiti. I made directions for people to sew dresses, collected materials, and organized sewing parties.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I pursued this Gold Award project because I wanted to help people in Haiti. I started
brainstorming when my Dad was planning on going to a mission trip to Haiti. I asked the coordinator of the mission team if there was anything I could do to help the Haitians, and he suggested making pillowcase dresses. I liked this idea because I enjoy sewing.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

578 dresses have been made and 664 pairs of underwear have been collected for my Gold Award project.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

• Sewing—I learned to sew dresses in order to make dresses and teach others how to make the dresses.

• Communication—I emailed, talked, and made Facebook posts in order to communicate with people.

• Knowledge about spreadsheets—I made my plan, kept track of the time I spent on my project, made a list of volunteers and people who donated, and kept track of my progress in spreadsheets, which helped me stay more organized.

How did you make your project sustainable?

Beyond my direct involvement, my project will be sustained through continued dressmaking. I donated the leftover materials from my project to Spiritual Threads, a sewing group that makes pillowcase dresses for Haiti. Also, I taught a lady going on a mission trip to Haiti how to make a pillowcase dress so that she could teach three girls at an orphanage to make dresses so that they can clothe themselves.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

The dresses were made for girls in Haiti.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I will most remember making dresses.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

Because I did my Gold Award, I learned about management and the steps it takes to complete a big project.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award is the most prestigious award a Girl Scout can earn, so earning the Gold Award is the biggest project I’ve ever done as a Girl Scout.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Megan Dirksen, Lakewood, “A Dog’s Eye View”

Megan Dirksen

Megan Dirksen
Lakewood
Bear Creek High School
A Dog’s Eye View

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project I created an informational video about Freedom Service Dogs. This organization trains and gives service dogs to people with disabilities or veterans. Here is the final video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWZ_oJamgII.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I pursued this Gold Award project to improve my skills in video, increase my communication skills, increase my interpersonal relationship skills, and to support a great organization that makes life better for both dogs and people.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My project made a difference by helping me learn new abilities and giving me the confidence to do a project of this scale. Also, this video was posted on social media sites and is helping increase awareness of the importance of service dogs.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

The skills I gained through earning my Gold Award were video and filming skills, communication, organization, patience, how to work with a team, be a leader, and see a project through to completion.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I will most remember the appreciation and thanks that I received from people who I filmed and people who have viewed the video too.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

Earning my Gold Award will help me in my future by helping my confidence, ability to possibly get scholarships or jobs, and working in a team environment.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel like the Gold Award is an important part of Girl Scouts because many of my previous Girl Scout skills were incorporated in finishing this project. It also gives me such a feeling of accomplishment and reward that I have enjoyed sharing with people.

Countries and Cultures day camp takes girls to new, intriguing places

Submitted by Daffodil
Bear Creek Lake Park

Countries and Cultures, Bear Creek Lake Park, Lakewood

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This week Day Camp brought us to many new and intriguing places. Countries and Cultures week at Bear Creek Lake Park in Lakewood gave campers the unique chance to travel the world and learn about new costumes and cultures. The week began with a brainstorm session as girls talked about where they would enjoy traveling. Destinations that the girls were able to visit included parts of Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Polynesian Islands.

Girls were immersed in these new places through food, music, and crafts. Snack time brought a chance for girls taste cheese from around Europe, and also featured an English-style tea party. Lunch was another creative way that campers experienced new places. Units prepared everything from a hearty poutine to Asian stir fry. Lunch was a fun and interactive experience for the girls every day this week.

Along with food, campers delighted in creating arts and crafts from different countries and cultures. Campers made sarongs, Chinese lanterns, African drums, Mexican piñatas, and so much more. For two days this week camp had the pleasure of hosting Sara, a foreign exchange student from Spain. Sara is a Girl Guide back home and jumped at the chance to be a part of Girl Scouts on her visit to Colorado. It was a learning opportunity for both Sara and campers to talk about the differences in our culture, and we loved having her around.

The week ended with a global buffet followed by interactive presentations from each unit. The buffet featured the classic all American hot dog, an eclectic fruit salad, a hearty helping of paella, and delicious dumplings. Presentations were presented camp wide and taught us about the culture of Kenya, China, and deaf culture. Girls walked away from camp with new knowledge and a new excitement for learning about our world.

This story was submitted via the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.