Tag Archives: Junior badge

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Junior Detective badge Part Three of Three

Do you want to try out the skills that make great detectives? Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team is here to help you earn your Junior Detective badge!

Now, let’s move on to Step Five! Watch this video for a fun scavenger hunt and follow clues to solve a real mystery. Here’s the print-out you will need to complete your scavenger hunt: Adult Handout for Final Scavenger Hunt

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Junior Detective badge Part Two of Three

Do you want to try out the skills that make great detectives? Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team is here to help you earn your Junior Detective badge! For Steps One and Two, we practiced the power of observation and used a special code to write a secret message. Steps Three and Four are to fingerprint for fun and try out detective science. Watch this video for some activities to do just that! For the “fingerprint for fun” activity, you can also print this fun handout, or you can draw it yourself: Fingerprint Printable Handout

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Junior Detective badge Part One of Three

Do you want to try out the skills that make great detectives? Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team is here to help you earn your Junior Detective badge! Watch this video for some fun activities to help you complete Steps One and Two, which are to practice the power of observation and communicate in code. You can also check out Smithsonian Magazine for their daily “Spot the Difference” activities.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Badges Through the Power of the Internet

Submitted by Brennah D.

Metro Denver

Highlands Ranch

I led my Girl Scout troop through the Scribe badge on Zoom. With my PowerPoint presentation, we were able to get everything checked off. This was my first time making a PowerPoint presentation and being a leader through online learning. It was fun!

I love Girl Scouts and everything it has let me do!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge Part Five of Five

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has five fun activities to help you complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge, which is to grow your own garden. Over the next few days, we’re going to share our favorite tips and tricks to planting a great garden, no matter how little space or money you have. So far, we have learned about sourcing seeds, windowsill gardens, container gardening, and companion gardens. For the last part of this series, we are going to learn about square root gardening.

If you have access to bigger pots, a raised bed, a bit of yard, or a plot at a community garden, you can practice square root gardening in order to get the most veggies for your space.

Different types of plants need different amounts of space. For example, you can plant 16 carrots or radishes in one square foot of soil, but one zucchini needs at least two-square feet to itself. To help make sure your spacing is correct, you can make your own seed tape!

Seed Tape Activity

Materials Needed:

  • Square root gardening chart
  • Toilet paper/Facial tissue/Tissue paper/Paper streamers (white is ideal, but any color is fine)
  • Cornstarch
  • Water
  • One Pot
  • One Wooden spoon
  • Seeds
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Paintbrush
  1. Gather your materials. We used crepe paper streamers, but any thin, easily dissolvable paper is fine (toilet paper, facial tissues – so long as there’s no lotion or aloe, tissue paper, etc.)
  2. Make the cornstarch paste. Add one cup of water and one tablespoon of cornstarch to a pot and place on your stove over medium heat. Whisk until boiling, then turn off water, and let it cool completely. It will be thick and gel-like when finished.
  3. Once your paste is cooled, we can make the tape. I am using carrot seeds, as they are super tiny and ideal for seed tape, but feel free to use whatever seeds you have. Refer to the square root gardening chart to determine how far apart to space your seeds.                                       .
  4. Measure out one foot of your paper. If you’re using something wider, cut it in two-inch wide strips.
  5. Measure the distance you want your seeds and mark it on one side of your strip .              
  6. Using a clean paint brush, dab a dot of your cornstarch paste on each dot.                                  
  7. Place one seed on each dot of paste. 
  8. Line the edge of your strip with a thin layer of paste, enough to stick, but not so much that you dissolve the paper. 
  9. Fold the strip in half and let dry. 
  10. Plant in your garden at the depth recommended by the seed packet.

Square Root Gardening Chart:

TYPES OF PLANTS NUMBER OF PLANTS PER SQUARE FOOT
16 carrots, beets, radishes, leaf lettuce, green onions
9 onions, turnips, spinach, peas, snap peas, parsnip, bush beans
4 pole beans, head lettuce, garlic, romaine, asparagus pea, corn
2 cucumber, celery, basil, potatoes, swiss chard, kale
1 peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage
½

 (THESE PLANTS NEED AT LEAST 2 SQ FEET EACH)

Summer squash, pumpkins, winter squash, melons, zucchini

 

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge Part Two of Five

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has five fun activities to help you complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge, which is to grow your own garden. Over the next few days, we’re going to share our favorite tips and tricks to planting a great garden, no matter how little space or money you have. In Part One, we learned all about sourcing seeds. Now, we are going to learn about windowsill gardens.

If you don’t have a yard or a balcony, there are plenty of plants you can grow right inside your home! Some plants need lots of light, and some don’t need very much at all! Herbs, like basil, oregano, dill, thyme, rosemary, parsley, and cilantro, are plants that do well in a windowsill garden! African violets are a plant that does not like a lot of direct sunlight and thrives in a windowsill garden.

Windowsill Garden Activity

Materials Needed:

  • Small containers like pots or cups (make sure they have holes in the bottom, and something to catch water that spills out)
  • Soil
  • Seeds/Seedlings
  • Water
  • Sunny window

The examples are building an herb garden, but you can use any seeds/plants you want.

Step One: Gather your materials.

Step Two: Poke holes in the bottom of your cups and label each cup.

Step Three: Fill your cups with soil. We used an organic garden soil from a hardware store.

Step Four: Plant your seeds according to the directions on the packet. Most herbs don’t need to be very deep.

Step Five: Place your cups in a shallow water tight container, and place on your windowsill.

Step Six: Don’t forget to water your new garden!

Step Seven: Keep the soil moist until the seeds sprout, then water according to the directions on the seed packets.

Step Eight: Enjoy your windowsill garden!

Here are some more examples of windowsill gardens.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: Complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge Part One of Five

 

 

 

 

 

 

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has five fun activities to help you complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge,, which is to grow your own garden. Over the next few days, we’re going to share our favorite tips and tricks to planting a great garden, no matter how little space or money you have.

There are four basic parts of a garden: plants, soil, water, and sunshine. You can achieve this with as little as one cup, some dirt, a few seeds, and a windowsill; or you can plant a raised bed garden in your backyard, your own plot in a community garden, or in pots on a porch or balcony. There are endless combinations that make great gardens!

Seeds are usually available for purchase at your local grocery or hardware store or garden center. If your family cannot afford seeds, there are still a few ways to get them, including seed libraries. You check seeds out from the library, plant them, and save seeds from the fruits and vegetables you grew and return those seeds to the library. To find a seed library near you, visit the Seed Library Database. With the help of your caregiver or troop leader, you can also participate in a seed swap with other Girl Scouts across the country. Additionally, there are a lot of seed swap groups on social media, just be sure to take Girl Scouts of the USA’s Internet Safety Pledge first.

Did you know that you can grow new food from food you buy at the grocery store? GSCO Media Star Myla shows you how to regrow vegetables from scraps!

Here are the steps to regrow vegetables from scraps:

  • For vegetables that still have an attached root or stem, you simply cut off roughly one to two inches from the bottom (or top). These are then placed in a container with water covering around half of the plant. The root should be placed down in the water. If it has a stem coming off the top, then the spot where you cut goes in the water.
  • Change the water every few days until you see a few inches of new growth and roots, then plant in soil.

Some examples of scraps you might do this with are celery, carrots, onions, beets, romaine, or bok choy.

Another way to regrow things is to save the seeds from them. After you cut open the vegetables, scrape the seeds into a bowl, and save them for later. Simply treat these like you would a pack of seeds you bought. Plant them in some soil and water when necessary. If, like me, you planted them in a small starter container like an egg carton, then you will need to transfer them to a larger container as the roots develop and the leaves get bigger. Because they are coming from seeds, these will need a little more time and patience to grow. Please also know that many vegetables from grocery stores are something called a hybrid plant. Hybrids are two species of a plant that have been combined to make a new plant. Most hybrid seeds will not sprout, but that is okay because it’s all about trying! Some things you can try this with are peppers, tomatoes, cucumbers, melons, or pumpkins.

Some other fun things you can try regrowing from scraps could be:

  • Potatoes: Simply peel a two-inch section of a potato that has at least three eyes on it. Let them dry out overnight before planting at least four-inch deep in soil. An eye on a potato is a spot where you can see a root sprouting. They kind of look like white growths on the potatoes.
  • Ginger: This amazing root is full of flavor. Just take a small section of the root and plant it with the small buds facing up.
  • Garlic: To grow more of this flavorful bulb, simply take a single clove and plant it root down in some soil. Soon, you will have some new shoots. Trim these back and soon you will have a new bulb. Repeat for endless garlic.

For a real challenge, try some fruit trees! Please keep in mind these will take a few years before producing any fruit. They are also trees, so make sure you give them space.

  • Cherries: Clean off the pit from a cherry. Plant in a small lidded container with nutrient rich soil. Cover it and place it in the fridge for around 12 weeks. Then, plant this in the ground.
  • Apples: Let the seeds from an apple dry out. Plant outside. Please note that seeds from the same apple can produce different types of apples.
  • Peaches, Plums, and Nectarines: Dry out the pit and plant them in nutrient rich soil that gets plenty of sunlight.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Junior Staying Fit badge Part Three of Five

For the week of May 4, 2020, GSCO Outreach Program Coordinator Amanda is helping Girl Scout Juniors earn their Staying Fit badge! Watch this video for an introduction to the badge. In Step One, we learned how to get our bodies moving. For Step Two, you learned how to keep your fit body fueled. Moving on to Step Three, let’s know how to stress less. GSCO staff members shared different ways they like to relieve stress in this video. You can also relieve stress by using a stress ball. Watch this video to learn how to make one at home.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Junior Animal Habitats badge Part Four of Four

Girl Scout Juniors can earn their Animal Habitats badge at home– thanks to Girl Scouts Colorado’s Outreach Program team! Be sure to check out all of our videos and blogs to learn more about where animals live, how they play, and how humans can help them. Step One was to find out about wild animals. In Step Two, Girl Scouts investigated an animal habitat. For Step Three, we created an animal house. Step Four had us exploring endangered habitats. Step Five, the last step of this badge, is to help protect animal habitats! In this video, we will learn about solitary bees, their importance to humans, and how we can help improve their local habitats by creating a bee bath and/or a bee nest.

For the bee bath, you will need:

  • A shallow dish
  • Smooth rocks or marbles
  • Water

For the bee nest, you will need:

  • A clean, empty plastic bottle
  • Paper grocery bag
  • Scissors
  • Tape or glue
  • String
  • A ruler
  • Pen or pencil

To learn more about solitary bees in Colorado, check out this fact sheet (https://extension.colostate.edu/docs/pubs/insect/05615.pdf) from Colorado State University.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story her

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Junior Animal Habitats badge Part Three of Four

Girl Scout Juniors can earn their Animal Habitats badge at home– thanks to Girl Scouts Colorado’s Outreach Program team! Be sure to check out all of our videos and blogs to learn more about where animals live, how they play, and how humans can help them. Step One was to find out about wild animals. In Step Two, Girl Scouts investigated an animal habitat. For Step Three, we created an animal house. Moving on to Step Four, we are going to explore endangered habitats. We’re going to simulate an oil spill clean-up to learn more about how humans can impact the habitats of some of the world’s most vulnerable animals. To complete this activity, you will need:

  • A pan or bowl
  • Water
  • Cooking Oil
  • Tools for cleaning up the oil; such as a spoon, string, paper towel, cotton balls, or any other item you have handy (don’t be afraid to experiment!)

Watch the video to learn more!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.