Tag Archives: Journeys

Pollinators and citizen science

Submitted by Robin Hill

Metro Denver

Aurora

Ruth and Aspen from Troop 60035 worked on their Think Like a Citizen Scientist Journey. For a field trip, they participated in a pollinator workshop at the Denver Botanic Gardens. They learned that National Pollinator Week was celebrated in June. Because of COVID-19, the usual events surrounding National Pollinator Week could not be held. That’s when their Take Action Project was born. The girls did a presentation about National Pollinator Week, common pollinators in Colorado, and ways to help pollinators through citizen science. Their presentation was shared with their troop, other troop leaders, and family and friends. They also enjoyed their Scistarter project, an ant picnic, where they examined what “foods” attracted ants. Pictures are from one of the citizen scientist observation games and from their ant picnic.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: “Think Like a Citizen Scientist” Challenges Part Four of Four

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has developed a series of “Think Like a Citizen Scientist” Challenges for the week of June 1, 2020. These activities aren’t Girl Scout level-specific. However, they would probably be best for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors. Each activity correlates with the Think Like a Citizen Scientist Journeys and are weather-related.

For your last challenge, you are going to make your own wind vane! Using a paper plate, cup, pencil, and string, girls will create their own wind vane, so they can tell which direction the wind is blowing.

Previous Challenges:

  • Use common household kitchen items to make your own hurricane! Girls will learn about the formation of hurricanes and will be able to see how they form.
  • In the “Climate around the World” experiment, girls will use items in the house and found outside to model different climates around the world and conduct an experiment on how the sun effects the different climates. Girls will learn the difference between weather and climate and explore climates all over the world!
  • Make your own sundial, using a paper plate and pencil. Girls will learn about the rotation of the Earth and how they can use that to tell the time!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: “Think Like a Citizen Scientist” Challenges Part Thee of Four

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has developed a series of “Think Like a Citizen Scientist” Challenges for the week of June 1, 2020. These activities aren’t Girl Scout level-specific. However, they would probably be best for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors. Each activity correlates with the Think Like a Citizen Scientist Journeys and are weather-related.

For your next challenge, you are going to make your own sundial, using a paper plate and pencil. Girls will learn about the rotation of the Earth and how they can use that to tell the time!

Previous Challenges:

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

 

Girl Scouting at Home: “Think Like a Citizen Scientist” Challenges Part One of Four

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has developed a series of “Think Like a Citizen Scientist” Challenges for the week of June 1, 2020. These activities aren’t Girl Scout level-specific. However, they would probably be best for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors. Each activity correlates with the Think Like a Citizen Scientist Journeys and are weather-related.

Watch this video to learn how to use common household kitchen items to make your own hurricane! Girls will learn about the formation of hurricanes and will be able to see how they form.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges Part Four of Four

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has developed a series of “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges for the week of May 11, 2020. These activities aren’t Girl Scout level-specific. However, they would probably be best for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, and younger Cadettes. Each activity correlates with the Think Like an Engineer Journeys as each Journey asks girls to do three design thinking activities, and that’s basically what these are.

Today’s challenge is to build your own parachute to explore air resistance vs. gravity! You will need cups, a coffee filter, shopping bag, and string. Watch this video to see this challenge in action!

Previous Challenges:

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges Part Three of Four

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has developed a series of “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges for the week of May 11, 2020. These activities aren’t Girl Scout level-specific. However, they would probably be best for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, and younger Cadettes. Each activity correlates with the Think Like an Engineer Journeys as each Journey asks girls to do three design thinking activities, and that’s basically what these are.

Today’s challenge is to create your own boat using foil, water, and coins. Watch this video and see how many coins your boat can hold before it sinks. What did you learn about buoyancy and gravity?

Previous Challenges:

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges Part Two of Four

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has developed a series of “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges for the week of May 11, 2020. These activities aren’t Girl Scout level-specific. However, they would probably be best for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, and younger Cadettes. Each activity correlates with the Think Like an Engineer Journeys as each Journey asks girls to do three design thinking activities, and that’s basically what these are.

Today’s challenge is to plan, design, and build a sturdy bridge using items from around your home! Watch this video for some ideas.

Check out yesterday’s challenge: Structural engineering

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges Part One of Four

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has developed a series of “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges for the week of May 11, 2020. These activities aren’t Girl Scout level-specific. However, they would probably be best for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, and younger Cadettes. Each activity correlates with the Think Like an Engineer Journeys as each Journey asks girls to do three design thinking activities, and that’s basically what these are.

Watch this video for your first challenge, structural engineering. You will need three pieces of paper, tape, and books. Your challenge is to build three different structures to find out which one is the most sturdy.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Multi-level Troop 65659 starts blog for and by people experiencing homelessness

Submitted by Jessica Spangler

Metro Denver

Denver

Girl Scout Cadette Elizabeth completed the “Think Like an Engineer” Journey with the help of her multi-level troop. She planned a blog to help improve the lives of people experiencing homelessness in the Denver Metro area. First, they used the Design Thinking Process (identify the problem, brainstorm, design, and test) to make a life vest for a dog,  camp cabin, and model elephant prosthetic. Next, they identified the causes of community problems with the question “But why?” They identified the problem they wanted to address: people experiencing homelessness . The girls came up with many questions about the problem. They learned that in 2019, 5,755 people were living in shelters or on the streets in the seven-county region and 946 people were staying in “unsheltered” locations, such as outside in tents, parks, vehicles, or underpasses.

Elizabeth and her troop thought making a blog and a comic to educate and inspire were both good ideas, so they chose to do both. They chose to make a blog with their comics to advocate for the un-housed in our community to help create understanding and compassion. Her idea was that if people learned more about how homelessness can happen, why it continues, and what is needed, the whole community, including people experiencing homelessness, will benefit from the knowledge being shared.

To make the project sustainable, the girls wanted individuals experiencing homelessness themselves to be able to contribute to the blog. The troop leader contacted The Delores Project, which provides safe, comfortable shelter and services for unaccompanied women and transgender individuals experiencing homelessness. The Delores Project staff was delighted to learn about the blog and how individuals could share their experiences and feelings anonymously. Individuals can contribute by commenting on one of the girls’ comics, or by working with a staff member to submit a blog entry of their own.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

 

 

Participate in a national textile project: The Violet Protest

Submitted by Ann Morton

Phoenix, AZ

The Violet Protest is a public effort to send 50 hand-made textile squares to each and every member of the 2021, 117th Congress in support of these core American values: civility and respect, citizenship, compromise, country over party and corporate influence, courage, candor, compassion, and creativity.

The call for the Violet Protest is for makers from across the United States to make 8″ x 8″ squares using a variety of textile techniques. Girl Scouts could sew, crochet, knit, quilt of embroider their squares, but specifically, the Violet Protest can provide a tutorial for a workshop on how to make a “no-sew” square using re-purposed jeans, iron-on adhesive, and scraps of blue and red fabrics. Learning includes whatever textile technique they might employ to make their squares. For the “no-sew” technique, girls will learn color composition, collage, and possibly embroidery techniques. Machine or hand-stitched embellishments are optional.

Participation in the Violet Protest aligns with the Journey Series “It’s Your World-Change it!” Specifically, Brownie Quest for Brownies, Agent of Change for Juniors, and Your Voice, Your World for Ambassadors. Potential badges to be earned are “Artist” or “Craft” under Life Skills – specifically Collage or Textile Artist under the Senior badges. Also, this project could align with the “Girl Scout Way” series of badges for all levels of Girl Scouts because as part of the making activity of the squares, Girl Scouts will review the project’s core values for which their square is being sent to Congress to support.

Leaders can visit the project website:
www.violetprotest.com Through the website, leaders can sign up and then receive an information packet and tags that Girl Scouts will attach to each square they make.

For further questions, leaders should connect directly with the artist organizing this project, Ann Morton at ann@violetprotest.com.

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This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.