Tag Archives: Highlands Ranch

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twelve Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing Take Action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Brittany Argo from Aurora, Cherokee Trail High School, built a prayer garden at St. Michael’s the Archangel and aided in the construction of a prayer garden at a church in the Philippines.
  • Evyn Batie from Loveland, Mountain View High School, led a team of students to create the Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide, an electronic compilation of some of the best youth mental health resources across the region.
  • Bryce Civiello from Evergreen, Conifer High School, designed a pamphlet for teens that can help them take the first steps toward getting help from a mental health professional.
  • Angela Foote from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, developed a relationship between the organizations Family Promise of Denver and Denver Tech for All to ensure low-resource students and families have ongoing access to computers.
  • Madeline Ford from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Boys & Girls Club to create a five-session literacy program, which promotes a positive reading environment and teaches children new ways to express themselves through books and poetry.
  • Littlepage Green from Breckenridge, Summit High School, created a lesson plan and video to educate students about food allergies. In-person lessons also included training on how to properly use an epi-pen.
  • Maya Hegde from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Mangala Seva Orphanage in India and Brydges Centre in Kenya to teach girls how to make reusable sanitary pads using materials they already have. The program she developed also taught the girls how to sell sanitary pads in their own communities to tackle the stigma around the menstrual cycle.
  • Grace Matsey from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, created a music tutoring program for elementary and middle school musicians, which was run by members of her high school’s Music Honor Society.
  • Annarlene Nikolaus from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon High School, oversaw the construction of a series of buddy benches for local K-12 public schools. Students also participated in age-appropriate lessons led by Annarlene about buddy benches and what they can do to be better friends.
  • Bailey Stokes from Buena Vista, Buena Vista High School, created outdoor-based lesson plans for the use of fourth grade science teachers across Colorado. Topics covered included investigations, habitat, and adaptations.
  • Emma Lily from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a website, created a podcast, and wrote a children’s book celebrating the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory and its historical significance.
  • Katherine Walden from Larkspur, Castle View High School, taught elementary school students about the importance of bees and how to install bee boxes that local bee species and other pollinators can call home.

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership is making the world a better place.”

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Brownie “Quest” Journey in a day

Submitted by Tiffany Baker

Metro Denver

Lone Tree – Highlands Ranch – Parker

Calling all Girl Scout Brownies! Cadette Troop 59 from Lone Tree – Highlands Ranch – Parker invites you to join them for the Brownie “Quest” Journey in a day event on Saturday, December 1, 2018 at Parker Library.

Brownies will discover their inner values and how this impacts their behavior, families, and community. All steps of the Journey, including a Take Action Project, will be covered during the event. Take Action projects will benefit the Denver homeless community and seniors at a local assisted living home.  Registration information is on the Girl Scouts of Colorado Events Calendar.

Troop 59 has received positive feedback for coordinating a recent Journey in a Day event:

“(Cadettes) very polite and inclusive of all the young girls.”

“The girls (Cadettes) did a great job leading, entertaining, and teaching the little girls. I’m very impressed! I like that each older girl had a specific job and executed it very well.”

“The troop ran an excellent event! I was impressed by the confidence and leadership of the Cadettes. Stations were very organized, and entertaining for the girls. Participation was great and the Cadettes did a great job of making all the girls feel included, and showing them that there was a way for all types of girls to be involved and have fun! Great job Troop 59! Thanks for having us!”

“The Cadettes did a FANTASTIC job! The event was well-organized and the communication received was excellent.”

“Location was great! Check-in easy. Organizers very affective.”

New! Our Cadettes are also following additional feedback and including the Brownie ‘Quest’ Journey patch set, within the registration price for chaperone pick-up at the Journey in a Day Event for volunteers’ convenience.

Troop 59 Cadettes are looking forward to seeing your Brownie Smiles in December!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Twisted Pine cookbook project

Submitted by Tiffany Baker

Metro Denver

Lone Tree – Highlands Ranch

Cadette Troop 59 of Lone Tree – Highlands Ranch invites Girl Scouts across Colorado to share their favorite camp cooking recipes.

Our girls are working on their aMaze! Journey this November, which focuses on multiple friendship topics. Coming together in the kitchen and around the campfire is something Girl Scouts have been sharing for generations. These 6th-7th graders have chosen to put together a camp cookbook for their Take Action Project to leave at Twisted Pine.

You can help by emailing your favorite camp recipes to tiffanylbaker@hotmail.com.

Please include:

  • Your Girl Scouts’ name (first name only)
  • Troop number
  • Current Girl Scout rank
  • Favorite camp recipe
  • Favorite Girl Scout memory

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Grace Matsey, Highlands Ranch, “Got Music?”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a music tutoring program for elementary and middle school musicians run by members of my high school’s Music Honor Society to help emphasize and educate about the importance of music and music education.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I compared the enrollment numbers from the orchestra classes in 2017-18 school year and the 2018-19 school year.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable because it is run by the members of my high school’s Music National Honor Society. The president of next year will be in charge, and so on and so forth. It will continue to help increase the participation in music programs, as well as helping to educate the importance of music and music education.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I communicated with the Program Coordinator for the head of the National Music Honor Society, and they were able to obtain information about my project to post it on their websites and have workshops on how to effectively teach music. This enables it to now be a national music tutoring program.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I can communicate with large groups of people. I spoke in front of an audience of 300 people, and it was really inspiring to see how you can connect with so many people at once, and how you know that they can all feel your passion for a project.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award will help me step forward with confidence in the future. I know that I can do anything, if I set a plan and work towards it.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think that if I had not completed the Gold Award, Girl Scouts would not have been such an important part of my life. This project helped me spread the awareness of something that I am passionate about, while working with amazing people and creating connections.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

It helped me become a go-getter because I set a very aggressive timeline, while also working with lots of people. I completed the majority of my project in one semester, and was still able to see results.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

G.I.R.L.s deliver thousands of school supplies for low-resource students

Girl Scout Junior Troop 1631 from Highlands Ranch, which has 14 girls, collected thousands of school supplies for low-resource students over the spring and summer. They included pencils, markers, glue, scissors, binders, paper, books, and teaching materials.  On Sunday, August 12, 2018, the girls delivered the supplies to an elementary school in Evans.

They were able to collect the supplies by reaching out to schools in their own community, and asking to place boxes in the lobby to collect supplies.  A dozen schools agreed to participate, and the girls worked with the schools to publicize their project through posters, an e-newsletter to parents, and the schools’ announcements. Additionally, some of the girls reached out to Office Depot in Highlands Ranch, which agreed to place another collection box in the front of the store.

Through this project, the girls will earn the Girl Scout Bronze Award,  the highest honor for a Girl Scout Junior and the third highest honor in Girl Scouts.

All four major TV stations in Denver shared the story of the girls’ project.

Earlier this summer, the girls completed their biggest girl-led project yet! Many of the girls were in the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) as babies, or have overcome some sort of medical challenge, so when completing the “Agent of Change” Journey, they wanted to do something to help children and families in the NICU at UCHealth. The girls assembled 20 NICU Care Kits and delivered them to the hospital in June. The full story, along with a few photos and thank you letters from parents who received the kits, is here: https://bit.ly/2usUFXc.

Brownie badge workshop and mini-golf

Submitted by Cassidy C.

Metro Denver

Highlands Ranch

Hi! I’m Cassidy and my troop would love to have Girl Scout Brownies come and start their new school year by attending our workshop. Earn your “Brownie Fair Play” badge and learn about golf! The First Tee of Denver and Troop 62967 will host a “Brownie Fair Play” badge workshop at Aqua Golf in Denver (501 W Florida Avenue, Denver, CO 80223) on Wednesday, August 22, 2018.

Come join Girl Scout Ambassadors and girls from a local high school golf team to learn about the great sport of golf. Have fun, learn about The First Tee of Denver, and some golf basics and then go try your skills at mini-golf. The “Brownie Fair Play” badge will be earned and pizza will be served!

Cost will be $10 per Brownie and includes the badge, mini-golf, and pizza/drink. Adults are free unless playing mini-golf. Mini-golf is $5 per adult.

Space is limited to 30 Girl Scouts and is open to Brownies only. Please sign up to secure your spot: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0f4da9aa2d6-brownie

Leaders and parents, please plan to attend to maintain GSCO troop safety ratios.PLEASE no tagalongs. Reservation is not set until payment is received. Payment can be via PayPal to catandcass@aol.com or check can be sent to Cathy Christian c/o Troop 62967 10138 Astorbrook Lane Highlands Ranch, CO 80126. Check should be made out to Girl Scout Troop 62967 Questions can be sent to catandcass@aol.com.

I have been a member of both Girl Scouts and The First Tee since kindergarten. I’m not a great golfer, but I love the sport. I’ve been on my high school golf team for the past two years. I have a lot of fun at practice and at the tournaments with my teammates. I’ve had one moment of glory…I did a hole-in-one at a high school tournament this spring! I would like to have other girls try the sport and see if it’s something they would like to do. Golf is a life-long sport and an amazing skill. There are many opportunities open to girls that play golf. The First Tee of Denver offers classes for all skill levels and they have leadership and scholarship opportunities for older girls. I’ve been fortunate to go to two national leadership conferences sponsored by The First Tee. Take a risk, try something new and come have a good time.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scout Juniors create NICU Care Kits

All 14 Girl Scout Juniors of Troop 1631 from Highlands Ranch recently completed their biggest girl-led project yet! Many of the girls were in the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) as babies, or have overcome some sort of medical challenge, so when completing the “Agent of Change” Journey, they wanted to do something to help children and families in the NICU at UCHealth. During the Journey, the girls talked about ways that they could make a difference individually, but with the help of their community, they could make an even bigger impact.

The project started with the intent of helping babies, and the girls invited a labor and delivery nurse to a meeting to talk with them about what happens when a baby is in NICU and what parents might experience.  Afterwards, the girls decided they wanted to make NICU Care Kits with the hopes of providing comfort to the parents, so they could focus on caring for their babies, and this nurse served as a consultant through the process.  The girls broke into three committees. One group was in charge of researching hospitals, and working with staff to coordinate logistics.  Another group researched items a parent might need and made suggestions on what should be included in the kits.  The third brainstormed ways to fund this project and obtain the items.

Once they narrowed down logistics, they delegated items for each girl to be responsible and were challenged to go out to the community and let others know what they were doing and ask for donations. Many businesses respectfully declined, but the girls were persistent and 85% of the items in the kits were donated.  This included pillows, toothbrush/toothpaste/dental floss, shampoo/conditioner, preemie clothes, snack bars, note pads (so parents could journal the experience), and a few other comfort items.  The girls even found someone to knit and donate preemie hats.  They also chose to use a portion of their cookie money to purchase items they felt they were missing from the kits and still needed.  In the end, the girls assembled 20 NICU Care Kits, and had about 30 more partial kits of extras.

In alignment of the “Agent of Change” Journey, not only were the girls able to get their community involved, but they also learned more about the community. For example, some of the snack bars were donated by Don’t Go Nuts, a local company that produces snacks that are completely nut-free, from the moment the ingredients are grown until they are produced in the facility.  They learned that this company was founded by a 14-year-old girl, not much older than them. Because she had life-threatening peanut and tree nut allergies, she wanted wholesome snacks that you didn’t have to fear were contaminated.  This was relatable to the girls, and an opportunity for them to see another girl not much older or different from them making a difference.

The girls began this project in November 2017, but between research and planning, participating in the Girl Scout Cookie Program, and other troop events, they completed it when the kits were delivered to UCHealth on June 20, 2018. The girls have already received thank you letters from parents who received their kits.

Hello, 

I have a baby in the NICU in Denver. I received the sweetest care package from Junior Girl Scout Troop 1631 out of Highlands Ranch. It was amazingly thoughtful and practical. Thought you should know about the awesome work they’re doing. 

I’m also staying at the Ronald McDonald House Aurora while my baby is in the NICU. Every time we see the Girl Scouts on the volunteer list we get excited. They are always great dinners that you can tell the girls were helping to create ( not just adults doing it all). The troops I know about serving us dinner are Troop 2246 and Troop 3687. There was another and I’m sorry I don’t know what troop they were with. They made kabobs that were cooked to perfection. 

I just wanted to reach out so you can tell them we really do appreciate all they have done for us during this time. 

Sincerely, 

Annie and JD (and baby Joey)

Hello,

I received the sweetest care package today from your Girl Scout group and I just wanted to say thanks. I wasn’t able to meet the girls because I was holding my baby, but I was truly blessed by their effort and thoughtfulness. It really made my day. Please let them know that I’m so thankful they were here today, and to keep caring for others. 

Thank you!

Krisangela

 

Girl Scout Gold Award candidate gets hole in one

Girl Scout Gold Award candidate Cassidy C. of Highlands Ranch recently accomplished something most golfers only dream about. She got a HOLE IN ONE! GSCO asked this G.I.R.L. to describe the experience in her own words.

“I’m still flying high on the hole in one. It was a 190 yard, par 3, hole #4 at Highlands Ranch Golf Club. It was during a high school varsity tournament (I’m a sophomore at Mountain Vista High School) and I used a nine iron. I couldn’t believe it got in the hole!

Gold Award Girl Scout: Justine Monsell, Highlands Ranch, “Remembering the Forgotten”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I wanted to give back to the veteran community. For my project, I provided emblem veteran grave markers to all of the veterans who were laid to rest in the Elizabeth Cemetery. In the cemetery, there were over 150 veterans. I was able to provide every single one with a plastic marker. For the oldest 24 veterans as well as the KIA.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

At first, I measured it by how many emblem markers I was able to provide for these veterans. After getting them all, it was about who showed up. I wanted not only for the families to feel like someone cares about what their loved one did, but also for the veterans to feel like there was actually someone there to support them. After my ceremony, I had the opportunity to talk to different veterans. They all talked about where they served and for how long. Some of them ended up thanking me. This baffled me since I should be the ones thanking them for their service to our country. They did something that not everyone could do.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I have developed a how-to guide to be able to continue my project in any cemetery. This project guide is a step-by-step guide to how I was able to provide emblems to the veterans. The guide explains what I did as well as what they can do. Each community is different. If one of my events doesn’t work, they can always conduct a similar event. As for the Elizabeth Cemetery, the American Legion will take on my project. In the cemetery, each veteran has an emblem, the 24 oldest ones have bronze markers while the rest have plastic. Each year, some of the plastic ones will be replaced with bronze ones.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Veterans have been serving our country since our ancestors claimed independence from England. Everyone knows, is, or has known a veteran. There is an abundance of people who are serving our country. Once they come home, they have a hard time connecting with people and some don’t feel as if they are supported in their community. Our soldiers are fighting overseas, so other people don’t have too. No one forced them to join. They are doing this willingly. My manual was sent out to people in different parts of the states so that they can recreate the project there if they would like too. I want my project to spread as far as it can go. Veterans are a big part of our society, and they deserve to feel like they are recognized even after they passed. The veterans who are still alive should know that there are people out there who do still thank them for what they’ve done. This also helps the families feel like they are not alone. No one wants to feel like they are alone.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that this community bettered my view of the world. There are more veterans out there and I want all of them to be remembered. Veterans aren’t always going to tell you who they are. They are humble and it has taught me to be more humble as well. The veterans that I met, want to make other people’s lives better even after they are done serving our country. This project connected deeper than I ever thought it would. At first it was for my grandparents and to pass on their tradition, but after it was for all the veterans out there. I have connected with the veterans and I know I want to continue to stay involved.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My Gold Award helped me gain a perspective on what is actually happening to our veterans as well as how the little things may not make a big change, but someone will notice a small change. The Gold Award can help me in the future to inspire others to make a change no matter how small. The Gold Award has also connected me to the veteran community. I know that if I need support I can look to them for it.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been in Girl Scouts since I was five-years-old. When I first heard about them forming a troop in our school, I got so excited that I told my mom to sign me up that night. The Gold Award was my final goal of Girl Scouts. In previous years, I have seen others get their Gold Awards and make changes and I wanted to do the same. The Gold Award wasn’t just another award, it was a project that made a big difference.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

After this project, I have become a go-getter. There were multiple times where I was told, that I would never be able to do what I want. When I first started, I did not have a lot of support from some people in my community. After being told in one cemetery that, “[I am] never going to be able to do this anywhere, in any cemetery, ever.” I decided to switch cemeteries. I connected with the Elizabeth Cemetery. Some people also told me that I would not be able to achieve my Gold Award in such a short time period. I put all my effort into it and proved them wrong. My project has spread across the veteran community and in fourth months, I hosted multiple events to provide emblem markers for over 150 veterans. I placed all of those emblem markers as well with the help of a supportive community.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Celebrating Girl Scouts’ 106th Birthday

Submitted by Tiffany Baker

Metro Denver

Highlands Ranch/Lone Tree

Girl Scouts’ 106th Birthday is March 12, 2018. Troop 59 of Highlands Ranch/Lone Tree celebrated a few days early with a cake decorating contest! Categories included STEM, superheroes, camping, patriotic, flowers, and of course, Girl Scouts!

Girl Scout Junior Diana B. created this volcano cake!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.