Tag Archives: Highest Awards

Bronze, Silver and Gold Awards

Congratulations to the Bronze Award Recipients December 2014!

Bronze_Award_Starburst_HRAll of the Colorado Girl Scouts who have achieved Girl Scouts Highest Awards this year have done amazing things! With your accomplishments, you have shown yourselves to be leaders in your community and advocates for others. Girl Scouts of Colorado is very proud of you all and the example you set!

Individual or combined Service Units are encouraged to plan celebrations honoring the highest awards recipients. Please contact your local Program Support Specialist for additional support.

Bronze Award Recipients December 2014

Troop41105 – Colorado Springs
Alexandra Shemon
Evelyn Opps
Kirra Suba
Naomie Daugherty
Zerelda Daugherty

 

Congratulations to the Silver Award Recipients December 2014!

Silver AwardAll of the Colorado Girl Scouts who have achieved Girl Scouts Highest Awards this year have done amazing things! With your accomplishments, you have shown yourselves to be leaders in your community and advocates for others. Girl Scouts of Colorado is very proud of you all and the example you set!

Individual or combined Service Units are encouraged to plan celebrations honoring the highest awards recipients. Please contact your local Program Support Specialist for additional support.

Silver Award Recipients December 2014

Troop41105 – Colorado Springs
Nichole Carano
Troop42393 – Colorado Springs
Emily Clark
Troop43360 – Fountain
Breanna Maxcy
Jordan Hensley
Natalie Unger
Troop62967 – Highlands Ranch
Cassidy Christian

Girl Scout creates STEM Day for Gold Award project

Submitted by Katherine

Western Colorado

Girl Scouts is the absolute most amazing experience and opportunity. Not only can you meet amazing people, experience new or abstract activities, pursue values and endeavors you love, but you can also change the world. My greatest goal in life is to improve the world in all ways. I’ve been working towards my Gold Award and my project has impacted me and my community greatly, which has begun my goal of helping people.

I’ve lived in the same rural, isolated town my entire life. In my town, I find education severely lacking. In fact, I went the first seven years of my school life without STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics), that explains my love and obsession with it in grade school, the first time I was exposed to it. I’ve taken every science class offered in my school and compete in extra science activities. I love science and plan on pursuing it in the future. I’ve had many friends that didn’t experience this though. STEM has the reputation of being challenging and frightening. Having never been exposed to it previously, they avoided it completely. My belief is that if they were exposed to it earlier, then they would be more interested in it now. Reviewing the school district’s lack of STEM education, I took the initiative and enacted a STEM day at the elementary school.

It took a lot of coordinating, leadership, planning, and communication. But, I arranged two full days, timing from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., where every class grades first through fourth would experience three different branches of science for thirty minutes. They spent seven minutes learning about physics, chemistry, and biology. At each station the students made a project to keep. This made the learning more fun and interactive. Not only did the students enjoy themselves, but they learned a lot too. They learned about air resistance and parachutes for physics, paint and food chemicals for chemistry, and DNA for biology. More importantly, they learned about possible career options and of the amazing world of STEM.

In order to know what was learned and enjoyed most for future STEM Days that will be continued by the teachers in future years, a survey was distributed to the students. These results showed that no students heard of STEM before that day, but most wanted to learn more about them and possibly pursue that as a career. The survey also compared the numbers of those who liked science in the beginning to those who liked it by the end of the day and there was a seven percent increase. This supports my idea that STEM education at a younger age will result in more students interested in those subjects. I have introduced over 500 students to the wonderful world of science. My hope is that by being introduced to science at a younger age, the classes will appear less intimidating, encouraging students to take science classes and to pursue such careers. Society is reliant on STEM and the related careers. By encouraging and educating the younger generations in STEM they will be more likely to pursue it and to benefit society through their expanded knowledge.

I took the first initiative to educate and offer the students scientific opportunities. Girl Scouts granted me this opportunity to encourage others in exploring my interest in STEM. Through this project I worked with a variety of ages, from the young elementary school students, to the high school volunteer helpers and educators, and to the adults that permitted such a day in the elementary school. Through this I expanded my interpersonal communication ability between all ages. Through this project, coupled with being the oldest and most experienced Girl Scout in Gunnison, I have evolved into being an excellent leader. Girl Scouts is extremely valuable to me and allows me to pursue my interests, achieve my greatest potential, and become a better person.

*** Earn your Gold Award by Feb. 28, 2015 and you could win the $1,000 Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize! It will be awarded to a Girl Scout who has received her Gold Award in the current year and whose project is selected by an independent panel as an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. To learn more click here.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Nina Asher, Greenwood Village, “Gates Summer Camp Hike”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Took inner-city Denver kids at the Boys and Girls Club on an education hike up near Boulder, CO.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I wanted to take the opportunity to make a positive impact on the kids at the Boys and Girls Club.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

I was able to teach the children about a topic they never would have learned about otherwise.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I became a better leader and more comfortable leading others. I was in charge of a group of counselors, who were older than I was, and I was forced to learn to interact and lead a group of people I was unfamiliar with leading.

How did you make your project sustainable?

I created a Hike Manual that will be passed down from summer to summer at the camp. It is for the counselors to use and teach from. Along with that, I created a Hike Activity Book for the campers to keep them engaged in what was being taught.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

Wherever these kids go in their life they always will keep the knowledge they learned at camp. This information will help them in many aspects including respecting nature and staying safe in circumstances of natural disasters common to Colorado.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

The most fond memory I have about my Gold Award project is working with the kids at Gates Camp and getting to interact and teach the children.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

This experience has taught me many things, but most importantly, about teaching children and what a difficult, but rewarding task that can be. In the future, I will keep the skills I learned from this project and apply them when I hopefully become a teacher.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award is a culmination of all my hard work over the years. Over everything I have learned when I was Brownie up to doing the actual project, everything I did lead up to my project and prepared me for that as well as for the rest of my life.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kirsten Brandes, Parker, “Beauty Is…”

Kirsten Brandes

Parker

Chaparral High School

“Beauty Is…”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I designed the curriculum for a series of workshops that fostered self-worth and self-esteem in teenage girls. I then presented the workshops to groups around the state.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I spent the last seven years attending, then aiding, and most recently instructing at Girl Scout water camps. I spent my summers surrounded by preteens in swim suits, and it’s never easier to read a girl’s insecurities in public than when she’s in a swimsuit. I watched confident, carefree 11-year-old girls become self-conscious at 13, and self-hating at 15-years-old. So, I decided to dedicate my project to teaching girls to be kind to themselves, that they are capable of so much more than being looked at.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?
It started girls on the long journey towards self-love, and gave them the tools to face down insecurity with optimism.

How did you make your project sustainable?

I had scouts volunteer to take over the presentation for older girls at future recruitment events and leadership workshops. I’ve trained them in how to run and present it, and will leave with them a condensed guide to the workshop.

What was your connection to the national or global community?
My project began in Parker, Colorado, with four high school freshman and me in my living room. At this first workshop, a family friend was impressed with the presentation and its message, asking me to present it again in Arvada, which I did two weeks later. At the Arvada presentation, a separate scout leader was present and she has asked if I could present it at statewide recruitment events. I have no doubt that, even without my direct involvement, the project will continue to grow, expanding its influence.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?
While I’ve never been one to shy away from crowds, I’ll be honest: I was nervous about presenting in front of teenage girls. I’d been a teenage girl; I know how they think, and more importantly, I have intimate knowledge of the year or so when they convince themselves it’s not cool to care, where insensitivity is synonymous with strength. But for my project to work, that barrier had to fall, and I found the easiest way to do that was to lead the way, and systematically deconstruct my own. Allowing them into my struggle with self-esteem and admitting my own insecurities was difficult, but effective. It created the necessary environment to address issues of such a personal nature. Leaders aren’t strong because they’re impervious, leaders are strong because they wear their insecurities like armor, acknowledging that it is not our faults that weaken us, but a failure to accept them and grow. I won’t soon forget that.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?
In the literal sense, the accomplishment of my Gold Award will allow me to enter the Air Force a rank higher, as an Airman, as opposed to the standard Airman Basic. Thanks Girl Scouts.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?
I feel as if I’ve achieved ultimate Girl Scout status, like the Gold Award is a cape tied around the neck of my scouting experience. And I spent so much time promising myself I was going to put on that cape someday, so to finally be able to feels absolutely super.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award project focuses on the awesomeness of Color Guard

Submitted by Rebecca

Colorado Springs

Greetings Girl Scouts!  My name is Rebecca.  I’m a Girl Scout Ambassador in 11th grade in Colorado Springs.  My Gold Award project “Guard is Great!” focused on informing the community (and the world) about the awesomeness of Color Guard.

Earning my Gold Award was important because I know it will help me in many ways for the rest of my life.  Once I earn the award, I will automatically have benefits for colleges and job opportunities, and younger girls will be more inspired to make a difference in the community. Earning the Girl Scout Gold award is an achievement that culminates my Girl Scout experience.  I wanted to earn my Gold Award because it is part of being a lifelong Girl Scout.  I also wanted to make a difference in the community by educating people about Color Guard.

Color Guard is an activity where we dance and spin flags, rifles, and sabers (all fake) to music, either performed by a marching band in the fall, or to recorded music in the winter. It is an activity where we accept those who are willing to give all of their time, effort, and love into what they do. Color Guard is an activity that is very demanding of time and talent.

I have been doing Color Guard since I was in seventh grade, and it was probably one of the best things I have ever done. In middle school, kids are finding out what their passion is and by the time they get into high school, they already know what sports or activities they are going to do outside of school. The problem with Color Guard being a high school sport is that nobody knows what it is until they are in high school, and by then it is too late to leave whatever activities they have decided to do.

Speaking as someone who has been doing this activity for the past five years, I want to make sure that when I graduate, I leave behind an amazing legacy that keeps up our reputation for being a state champion. In the last two years, our guard has had only eight people march during the fall. Of those eight people, five of them would be graduating within the next two years. I wanted to save our guard so that we would never have to worry about having enough people who really wanted to be in the activity.

I knew that advertising to high school students who already have enough on their hands wouldn’t be helpful, so instead I targeted middle school students. Since middle school is all about trying new things and figuring out what you want to do with your life, I figured that this would be a perfect audience for the cause I was trying to save.

The first thing I did was figure out what exactly I wanted to do to advertise the activity. I remembered from my first two years in Color Guard that our old coach would set up a mini day camp to teach middle school students the basics of spinning and invite them to join. It was very effective (it’s how I joined), and I decided that I could do the same thing again.

I emailed the Mountain Ridge Middle School athletic director to ask him if I could reserve a few dates in the gym for my clinic. Every month leading up to the clinic, I emailed him back to make sure that the gym was still open for my event. Once I knew for sure that I would have space to put on the event, I made a flyer to be put in the main office at Mountain Ridge Middle School with all of the details needed for the participants. A few of the members in my guard were in middle school, so I asked them to talk about it on the morning announcements. I figured that I would need something to remember the clinic, so I asked someone in my guard to design and order T-shirts for everyone who showed up. I also sent information to other Middle Schools in the district.

On the first day of the clinic, I introduced the attendees to what Color Guard is by teaching them warm-ups and some basic routines. Most of the attendees got pretty excited. Neither of my coaches could make it, so I taught along with my teammates by separating everyone into small groups and teaching individually.

One of the problems I faced was a lack of enthusiasm on the part of the attendees. Even though I knew they were enjoying themselves, I noticed that everyone was surprisingly quiet. Nobody said a word during the first day of practice, so I made a note to bring up conversation on the second and third days.

The next two days were a lot more comfortable and efficient in teaching. One of my coaches was able to make it to the second day, but the other coach got caught in traffic on the way to the third day. As far as I could tell, everyone was happy to be there. We invited the eighth graders to come to our winter practices to see if they really wanted to join. A few of them are now a part of the guard, and are improving at a great pace because of their prior knowledge from the clinic.

Where we’ve only had eight guard members for the past two years, we now have 21!  Because this event was so effective, I put all of the information that I needed to organize the event on a flash drive so that I can give it to anyone who wants to repeat the event.

In organizing this three week event, I learned that it takes a lot of work and pressure to make something happen, and that you need to be okay with things not going right. It is important to deal with issues like coaches not being able to attend, and there always needs to be a backup plan in case something goes wrong. In the future, I plan on putting on this event at least once every year so that we can keep the numbers of fresh spinners high on our list of people who want to join. I also created a manual for other schools to follow so they can put on a similar clinic as well, complete with permission slips, equipment needed, jobs for staff, how to reserve gym space, sample daily schedules, and instructions for ordering t-shirts.  I gave this manual (on a flash drive) to captains of several other high schools, and I made a Facebook and YouTube page with similar information and instructional videos so guards all over the world can take advantage of the event.

This project really helped me see how big of an impact I can create on the community and that issues that nobody knows about really can be fixed. Yes, it takes a lot of dedication and work, but the final result of my project was worth it. I am content in knowing that I have made the future of my Color Guard better, and I hope that everyone can get the chance to feel like they have made a difference in the community, no matter how big or small the issue is.

*** Earn your Gold Award by Feb. 28, 2015 and you could win the $1,000 Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize! It will be awarded to a Girl Scout who has received her Gold Award in the current year and whose project is selected by an independent panel as an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. To learn more click here.

Congratulations to the Silver Award Recipients November 2014!

Silver AwardAll of the Colorado Girl Scouts who have achieved Girl Scouts Highest Awards this year have done amazing things! With your accomplishments, you have shown yourselves to be leaders in your community and advocates for others. Girl Scouts of Colorado is very proud of you all and the example you set!

Individual or combined Service Units are encouraged to plan celebrations honoring the highest awards recipients. Please contact your local Program Support Specialist for additional support.

Silver Award Recipients November 2014

Troop19113 – Glenwood Springs

Carily Cook

Troop33359 – Wiley

Emily Smith-Sena

Kalie Black

Kari Mosier

Kimber Robbins

Troop42393 – Colorado Springs

Alyson Serio

Troop50257 – Golden

Cameron Preston

Zoi Johns

Troop50516 – Thornton

Carissa Lobb

Troop60100 – Highlands Ranch

Abby Barnes

Jessica Sweeney

Katherine (Kate) Bleyle

Troop60470 – Aurora

Abby Klopfer

Adriana Joga

Averi Eisaman

Troop73488 – Longmont

Isabella Karina Mendoza

Congratulations to the Bronze Award Recipients November 2014!

Bronze_Award_Starburst_HRAll of the Colorado Girl Scouts who have achieved Girl Scouts Highest Awards this year have done amazing things! With your accomplishments, you have shown yourselves to be leaders in your community and advocates for others. Girl Scouts of Colorado is very proud of you all and the example you set!

Individual or combined Service Units are encouraged to plan celebrations honoring the highest awards recipients. Please contact your local Program Support Specialist for additional support.

Bronze Award Recipients November 2014

Troop13542 – Glenwood Springs

Abby Cook

Troop33359 – Wiley

Audrie Black

Troop42166 – Colorado Springs

Alessandra Dotson

Troop44179 – Colorado Springs

Kaylee Brown

Troop52129 – Golden

Emily Reid

Jade Preston

Katy Radcliffe

Raine Lee-Findling

Troop54386 – Lakewood

Avery Wilson

Juliana Hebel

Kayli Langan

Laura Bunetta

Lucy Carney

Zoe Hafner

Troop71748 – Fort Collins

Evelyn Henning

Kanyon Hardle

Keira Gillespie

Kya Tracy

Sierra Barkau O’Connor

Congratulations to the Silver Award Recipients October 2014!

Silver AwardAll of the Colorado Girl Scouts who have achieved Girl Scouts Highest Awards this year have done amazing things! With your accomplishments, you have shown yourselves to be leaders in your community and advocates for others. Girl Scouts of Colorado is very proud of you all and the example you set!

Individual or combined Service Units are encouraged to plan celebrations honoring the highest awards recipients. Please contact your local Program Support Specialist for additional support.

Silver Award Recipients October 2014

Troop10094 – Montrose

Loveann Cox

Troop40444 – Colorado Springs

Erin Kitchenka

Troop51866 – Morrison

Callie Grawe

Casey Johnston

Cecelia Kronemeyer

Rachel Shirlaw

Riley Morgenthaler

Troop53301 – Golden

Sarah Haban

Troop61772 – Aurora

Ally St John

Brittany Stadler

Hannah Carey

Madeline Crespo

Madison Leeper

Mikayla Algeo

Troop61951 – Highlands Ranch

Emily Jones

Troop62847 – Castle Rock

Cassie Unruh

Troop80925 – Hugo

Jaidyn Knutson

Congratulations to the Bronze Award Recipients October 2014!

Bronze_Award_Starburst_HRAll of the Colorado Girl Scouts who have achieved Girl Scouts Highest Awards this year have done amazing things! With your accomplishments, you have shown yourselves to be leaders in your community and advocates for others. Girl Scouts of Colorado is very proud of you all and the example you set!

Individual or combined Service Units are encouraged to plan celebrations honoring the highest awards recipients. Please contact your local Program Support Specialist for additional support.

Bronze Award Recipients October 2014

Troop14643 – Grand Junction

Felicity Eli

Troop41736 – Colorado Springs

Hailey Decker

Jadzia Brown

McKenzie Costa

Troop43944 – Colorado Springs

Katherine Pierce

Kayla James

Troop61046 – Aurora

Anna Carpenter

Anna Kriss

Avery Echols

Danae Johnson

Ella Mahaffy

Gabriella Black

Kira Heidebrecht

Lauren Linnebur

Lekili Hodge

Malayne Perry

Megan Hutchinson

Molly Morello

Talia Rosales

Troop71043 – Longmont

Anna Sallee

Emily Wiggins

Janice Newton

Laney Miller

Libby Burton

Madison Capezzano

Makayla Allman

Tess Northcutt

Vera Schmutz

Wiley Denesha