Tag Archives: Healthy Living

Gold Award Girl Scout: Kaitlyn Ketchell, Monument, “Eating Disorder Education”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

The main issue I tackled in my project was lack of education and awareness about eating disorders; namely, warning signs and seeking treatment, as well as general education about eating disorders. The old curriculum used in the health classes at my high school didn’t provide the right kind of education about eating disorders that would allow students to better understand and handle eating disorders, so I created a new curriculum for the middle and high schools in my district. I also created informational pamphlets about eating disorders, which I distributed to local medical establishments (clinics, pharmacies, etc.) and some of the schools in my district.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

In order to measure the impact of my project, I created two surveys with questions about eating disorders: one for students to take before watching my presentation on eating disorders, and one for students to take after watching my presentation on eating disorders. Then (with the help of a friend), I analyzed the results and found that scores were much improved on the post-survey.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable through the continued use of my eating disorder lessons by the high school health teachers. Additionally, my lessons are available for free on the Teachers Pay Teachers website and can be used by anyone.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global/national connection is through the Teachers Pay Teachers website, making my lessons available to anyone for free (teachers, home-schoolers, and more) to use any time.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I’m more resilient than I previously thought. When COVID-19 shut down the schools in my district, I thought that would be the death of my project. However, I worked with the members of my team and was able to record myself teaching my lessons, which the health teachers were able to use in their virtual classes.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award has increased my confidence, my leadership skills, and my ability to navigate bureaucracies. This has taught me that I am capable of persevering through whatever challenges I may face in the future. When I face roadblocks in the future, I will draw upon the things I learned from my Gold Award project to persevere through them.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award is Girl Scouts’ highest achievement. Earning this was important to me as a Girl Scout because I set the goal early on and was able to achieve it. I first learned about the Gold Award when my troop leader introduced us to the Bronze Award. Earning the Bronze and Silver Awards inspired me to continue toward my goal of earning Gold.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning my Gold Award helped me become an innovator because I had to come up with new ideas and unique solutions to new problems (like COVID-19 shutting down our schools).

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Wren Murzyn, Fort Collins, “Guidebook to Healthy Eating and Living”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a guidebook to assist individuals who are wanting to get healthy, but don’t know where to start. More than 70 percent of the United States is considered overweight and many who are don’t understand why and don’t know how to start to change their lifestyle.  My family was part of this statistic – growing up we didn’t have money or time to focus on healthy eating and setting healthy goals.  In creating this guidebook, I wanted to provide a resource that offered information on creating uncomplicated healthy habits that could easily be incorporated into a busy lifestyle or one that is on a budget.  My goal was to provide a resource to encourage a focus on overall health and well-being, making sure individuals gained healthy habits, and not just focused on losing weight.  The guidebook is divided into six sections and includes the latest information available to start the journey and also includes a lot of recipes and tips.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I wanted to make sure my guidebook was available to a variety of people, so I set it up as a PDF and as a website. I sent flyers and business cards to doctors, nutritionists, hospitals, food banks, and even my school district and school board and asked that they pass them out to their patients, clients, and students.  I also promoted it on social media.  I requested feedback and suggestions and enabled web analytics to track how many people were looking at and using the information.  I made sure that the information presented was clear, concise, easy to use, and was from trusted sources and had been reviewed by nutritionists so that anyone using the information would find benefit.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

By making sure the guidebook was broadly available I was able to receive feedback from multiple contacts. The fact that my guidebook is on the web and on social media will help sustain it and encourage it’s use.  I am also updating the content based on the feedback I’m receiving and, as part of my International Baccalaureate work in high school, I’m continuing to add information to provide even more context around the issue like the correlation between early education and a healthy lifestyle.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

As part of my efforts to promote the guidebook, I contacted the agencies whose information I had used for parts of my project. Several got back to me and, based on web analytics I can see that others, like the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland reviewed my work.

What did you learn about yourself?

Starting my Gold Award prior to the pandemic and ending it during the virus crisis taught me to be flexible, resourceful, open-minded, and how to truly be a leader. I had to revise my plans multiple times in order to change with the conditions we were all facing.  Many of the ideas I had needed to be revised after I was well into the project and my leadership skills were tested by having to ask for resources and assistance virtually.  My team was made up of health and nutrition specialists at doctor’s offices and schools who had their own issues with the virus. So, I had to make sure that my project didn’t impact the work that they were doing, with this in mind I kept moving forward which really allowed me to develop as a leader and helped me feel comfortable asking for help and directing people older than me.  I’m very proud of my finished product and am looking forward to continued feedback from people who use it.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The Gold Award allowed me to grow in project management, leadership, and creative problem solving, as well as letting me gain in depth knowledge on a subject that was impactful to my family and my community. I feel that being able to refine these skills while I’m in high school will help me in college and my career where I’ll often be asked to do research, lead groups, and make sure I’m heard in professional groups.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience? 

I have been a Girl Scout since I was a Daisy in Kindergarten. I’ve earned my Bronze and Silver Awards and have been looking forward to doing a large, impactful project where I was the leader.  Girl Scouts has prepared me for the Gold Award by allowing me to plan, lead, and budget for meetings, badge requirements, service projects, and even parts of trips we took as a troop.  The Gold Award was a way for me to take all my Girl Scout experiences and use them to develop something that will continue to benefit the community.  I am very glad I chose to complete it and am proud when I tell people that I have earned the award.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

The Gold Award definitely developed my leadership skills – working with, directing, and managing a group of professional adults which was challenging and rewarding and allowed me to realize that I am very capable of managing a team. Earning the Gold Award also helped me be a go-getter – from developing a concept to dealing with a pandemic and having to redo and revise the project as a result – I was constantly working to make sure my project was able to move forward and that I could finish it.  As a risk-taker, I tackled a subject that I had a very personal connection to but I didn’t have a lot of knowledge about.  I knew I wanted to make something that would be helping people get healthier and I took a risk that I would be able to create something that would inspire and motivate my audience.  Finally, I also got to be an innovator by sampling recipes, working with nutritionists to revise them, and thinking up tips and tricks to help people with little free time to eat healthy and take a chance on trying and experimenting with home cooking.  I feel the Gold Award definitely helped me become a well-rounded G.I.R.L.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Healthy lives = happy lives

Submitted by Staci Calderon

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Troop 4636 ventured out to Natural Grocers and learned how to shop healthy and prepare lunches to maintain healthy bodies and even use good supplements for this as ultra omega burn that burn fat faster. Great experience!Thank you to Natural Grocers for taking the time with our girls.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Healthy Living Conference on Western Slope a huge success

 

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Submitted by Allison Ellington
Grand Junction
Western Slope

Troop 33 from Grand Junction had some great ideas on what they wanted to learn about at an older girl conference. I met with them, we brainstormed and this Healthy Living Conference was the result. Thanks for the fantastic ideas! We had so many community partners ready to come to this and share their expertise, it was fantastic. We also had a great turnout – 35 Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors and Ambassadors from all over the Western Slope.

We started the day off with some Crossfit training and dancing with some coaches from Kaia Fitness. The girls learned about healthy skin and how to protect themselves from the harsh sun from Rodan and Fields representative, Kristin. We had a psychologist come in and do a workshop on dealing with emotions and stress. They followed that up with making stress balls and doing some meditative relaxation. Thanks for that, Dr. Amy.

The girls loved making their own healthy lunch together while trying out some fun tools from Pampered Chef helper, Laura. Lunch was all purchased at Natural Grocers who also sent their Nutritionist, Dustin. The girls had a ton of questions for him! We ended the day with some relaxing and centering yoga with our favorite yoga instructor, Maegan. What a blast! I have heard back from girls and parents that this was a very impactful day – they had a great time and learned a ton. All of our community partners can’t wait to do this again.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Hundreds enjoy Girl Scouts Healthy Living Expo

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Hundreds of Girl Scouts and their families and friends joined Girl Scouts of Colorado for our Healthy Living Expo at the DaVita World Headquarters in Denver on Wednesday evening, July 10. The event was sponsored by DaVita, ZisBoomBah, Anthem, Waterpik, Garbanzo Mediterranean Grill, Delta Dental, Sports Authority and Big 5 Sporting Goods.

Participants discovered more about healthy living through hands-on activities in a fun carnival setting. Activity booths included information about nutrition, exercise, strong bones, heart health, self-esteem, fitness and more. There were also prizes given away, including iPods and restaurant gift cards. Booths and activity stations were courtesy of Girl Scouts of Colorado and our community partners, including ZisBoomBah, Live Well Colorado, Rocky Mountain Youth Clinics, DaVita, United States Olympic Committee, Mary Lee Chin – Dietician, BYOU “Be Your Own You!” Magazine, Juice Plus+, MELT Bath & Skincare, and Body & Brain Holistic Yoga.

Recognition was also given to Girl Scouts who had completed Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Live Healthy, Lead Healthy Challenge during the past year.

Posted by Amanda Kalina, PR Director with Girl Scouts of Colorado, with help from Rachelle Trujillo, Chief Marketing Officer with Girl Scouts of Colorado, and Sloan Gonzales, Program Support Specialist with Girl Scouts of Colorado

ZisBoomBah is calling all Girl Scout Daisies

Attention, Attention, Attention… ZisBoomBah is calling all Girl Scout Daisies. Did you know that ZisBoomBah is for Daisies too, they have quests designed just for them! ZisBoomBah is a Daisy friendly online gaming site where girls can learn all about healthy living and have a blast while doing it. ZisBoomBah has lots of quests for girls to do but they also have Daisy specific quests. Quests are what ZisBoomBah calls their online games and activities. Girls will learn about how their bodies need energy, what foods give them energy, how to have fun with fitness, and many more. Here is a great example of a Daisy quest called The ABC’s of Eating…

What we’re learning:
Goal 1 – How do vitamins keep your body strong and healthy?
Goal 2 – Why is it important to eat a variety of foods?

Boom pulls Bah out of the kitchen and into the sun.

“Thanks for all the cooking, Bah, but it’s good for you to be outside!” says Boom.

“Why is that?” asks Bah.

“You get vitamin D powers for strong bones when you stand in the sun or drink milk,” explains Boom.

“Don’t forget all the vitamin powers you get from eating fruits and veggies, too!” adds Zis as she joins them.

“What kinds of powers?” asks Bah, who likes cooking very much.

“Leafy greens like spinach, meat, and eggs give you vitamin B energy power,” says Zis. “Vitamin B has a big family—B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B7, B9, and B12!”

“That’s a good one to know,” replies Boom as he jogs in place.

“Oh oh! Fruits and veggies like carrots and sweet potatoes give you vitamin A, which makes it easier to see at night in the dark!” says Zis excitedly.

“Ooo, I like that one,” says Bah.

“And fruits and veggies like oranges and broccoli have vitamin C. It helps your body heal if you get hurt!” adds Zis.

“Oranges are my favorite. Good thing, because I get a lot of scrapes,” says Boom. Zis and Bah laugh.

To check out this quest and more at http://www.zisboombah.com/. To sign your Girl Scout troop up or for more information, please contact sloan.moore@gscolorado.org. If your troop signs up by November 30th and completes two quests, they will receive the Brand New ZisBoomBah Patch for FREE! What are you waiting for? Sign up today!

Girl Scouts honor 2012 Denver Women of Distinction at Thin Mint Dinner

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A capacity crowd of 550+ joined Girl Scouts of Colorado at the Sheraton Denver Downtown for an exciting Thin Mint Dinner to honor the 2012 Denver-metro class of Girl Scout Women of Distinction. The event raised $200,000+ for Girl Scouts of Colorado.

The event spotlighted Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Live Healthy, Lead Healthy initiative, focusing on self-esteem, good nutrition, exercise and reducing childhood obesity. Premiering at the event was a video on healthy living created by Colorado Springs Girl Scout Troop 3810. (View the video here.) Lead sponsor for this initiative is the Thiry O’Leary Foundation.

Emcees for the event were Cheryl Preheim, 9News anchor, and Marcelo Balboa, Hall of Fame Colorado Rapids player and Monarch High School coach. Troop 3449 opened the event with a flag ceremony and instrumental musical assistance provided by Girl Scouts of Troop 1472, Victoria Shead (violin) and Melissa Cardenas (cello). The emcees also led an inspirational panel discussion at the event with this year’s Women of Distinction honorees on women’s leadership. (View the video here.)

The three-course dinner featured the creative use of Girl Scout Cookies. (View the recipes here.) Honorary event chair was Former First Lady of Colorado Jeannie Ritter (2009 Woman of Distinction). Event co-chairs were Susan Knox with Cricket and Katherine Peck (1998 Woman of Distinction) with The Gill Foundation.

Girl Scouts of Colorado honors top women leaders in our community as Girl Scout Women of Distinction. These women have reached remarkable levels of achievement as business, philanthropic, government, education and community leaders. They are committed to making the world a better place for the girls of today and tomorrow. They donate their time, talents and experience to Girl Scouting and also support Girl Scouts financially. Since 1997, 387 women have been named as Women of Distinction in the Denver-metro area and raised more than $1.5 million for Girl Scouts of Colorado.

2012 Denver-metro Women of Distinction are: Dr. Jandel Allen-Davis, Peg Bradley-Doppes, Juanita Chacon, Tricia Downing, Melba “Mel” Johnston, Denise O’Leary, Maren Stewart (Learn more about these women here.)

Special thanks goes to the following major sponsors of this event: DaVita, Comcast, UMB Bank, Wagner Equipment Company, Anthem BlueCross and BlueShield, FirstBank and Delta Dental of Colorado.

For more information on the Girl Scouts of Colorado Women of Distinction program, visit our website at girlscoutsofcolorado.org/donors/women-of-distinction. And watch the local press in the next few weeks for articles about this event (we will post links to the stories here too).

Media placements on this event:

Girl Scout ‘goes for the Gold’ in Hungary

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In mid-September, Girl Scout Paige Witter from Denver traveled to Hungary to compete for Team USA in the Modern Pentathlon Youth World Championships. Pentathlon includes competitions in fencing, running, shooting and swimming. A total of six USA athletes competed.

Paige’s journey to Hungary only began in the summer of 2011.

“I started pentathlon last summer when I began fencing,” said Paige. “My fencing coach heard that I had been swimming for seven years, so she sent me down to the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs for a Pentathlon camp. I competed in Nationals that summer, and continued to train throughout my junior year of high school. This past summer I again competed in the National Competition, and placed 2nd, and qualified for the Youth A World Championships in Tata, Hungary.”

Paige says she trains five to six times a week. Her training routine includes swimming three to five times, fencing and shooting three to four, and running every day she trains.

“I really like pentathlon because you can never get bored. By training for multiple sports, every part of your body is tested,” said Paige. “Swimming is very physical, but in a different way than running or fencing. Fencing is also very mental, while shooting requires concentration.”

Paige has also managed to find time for Girl Scouts in between school work and her pentathlon training. She got involved in Girl Scouts as a Brownie in first grade. Her troop is very active in service projects to benefit her community. In fact, in October Paige will be completing the highest award in Girl Scouts, the Gold Award, which she earned by organizing a tutoring program between her high school, George Washington, and Smiley Middle School.

“I really like my troop and troop leaders,” said Paige, who is a senior in high school this year and been with the same Girl Scout troop since 3rd grade. “Through my Gold Award I have worked to not only help kids succeed in middle school, but to provide role models and examples of success in high school and beyond.”

Paige placed 60th at the 2012 Modern Pentathlon Youth World Championships in Hungary. For more information on Pentathlon visit pentathlon.org.

2012 Girl Scouts Women of Distinction honored in Colorado Springs

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Last Thursday evening, Sept. 13th, Girl Scouts of Colorado honored their 2012 Pikes Peak Women of Distinction and Women to Watch at the Thin Mint Dinner at Cheyenne Mountain Resort in Colorado Springs. A group of nearly 225 gathered at the event, which raised money for local Girl Scouting programs as well.

This dinner event spotlighted Girl Scouts’ Live Healthy, Lead Healthy initiative, focusing on self-esteem, good nutrition and exercise that will help prevent health issues and other serious ailments that affect girls and women. Premiering at the event was a video on healthy living created by Colorado Springs Girl Scout Troop 3810. View the video here.

Nancy Saltzman, who recently published Radical Survivor: One Woman’s Path Through Life, Love, and Uncharted Tragedy, was the keynote speaker, and Craig Eliot from KOAA-TV and Katie Carroll from the Better Business Bureau of Southern Colorado were the emcees. U.S. Olympic bobsledding athlete Emily Azevedo, who placed 5th in the 2010 Olympics, signed autographs and posed for photos with guests as well as spoke about healthy living and the impact Girl Scouts had on her life. The event was a three-course dinner featuring the creative use of Girl Scout Cookies. Event chair was Mary Lou Makepeace, the 2002 Girl Scouts of Colorado Mary Jean Larson Community Service Award recipient.

Girl Scouts of Colorado honors top women leaders in our community as Girl Scout Women of Distinction or Women to Watch. These women have reached remarkable levels of achievement as business, philanthropic, government, education and community leaders. They are committed to making the world a better place for the girls of today and tomorrow. They donate their time, talents and experience to Girl Scouting and also support Girl Scouts financially. Since 2000, 43 women have been named as Pikes Peak Women of Distinction and raised more than $300,000 for Girl Scouts of Colorado.

2012 Girl Scouts Pikes Peak region Women of Distinction are: Claire Garcia, Rosemary Harris Lytle, Dee Vazquez Sabol, Mary Thurman and Linda Weise

2012 Girl Scouts Pikes Peak region Women to Watch are: Liz Denson and Amanda Mountain (This was a new honor in 2012 recognizing emerging women leaders under 40.)

Special thanks goes to the following sponsors of this event: FirstBank, Cricket Communications, The Gazette, Ent Federal Credit Union, Mido Printing, Delta Dental of Colorado, El Pomar Foundation and BKD LLP.

For more information on the Girl Scouts of Colorado Women of Distinction program, visit our website at girlscoutsofcolorado.org/donors/women-of-distinction. The Colorado Springs Gazette also did a nice post event article with photos in their Sunday, Sept. 30th, edition. There was also an article in the Oct. 12th Cheyenne/Woodman Editions.

Posted by Amanda Kalina, Director of PR, Girl Scouts of Colorado