Tag Archives: GSUSA

G.I.R.L. 2020 National Internship Opportunity for Girl Scouts in Grades 8-10

Every three years, Girl Scouts from across our Movement come together to make the most important decisions about Girl Scouting, and for a weekend of life-changing leadership experiences and fun! Girl Scouts’ 55th National Council Session and G.I.R.L. 2020 will take place in October 2020 in Orlando, Florida. Through inspiring activities and influential speakers, this event will provide thousands of Girl Scouts with the tools to empower themselves and to lead change in their communities.

G.I.R.L. 2020 will be planned by a team of 25 Girl Scouts called the G-TEAM. Members of this team will guide the overall direction of G.I.R.L. 2020 and have the opportunity to participate in field-specific internships in areas such as marketing, event production, governance, logistics, and more. The G-TEAM will spend two years planning for G. I.R.L. 2020, including in-person planning sessions in Orlando, Florida and New York City (all expenses paid by Girl Scouts). At the event in Orlando, the G-TEAM will be both the behind-the-scenes and on-the-stage leaders for this major event.

All Girl Scouts who are currently in grades 8–10 are eligible to apply. The application opens October 19, 2018 and closes November 19 at midnight eastern time.

Spread the word to Girl Scout Cadettes and Seniors for this national internship opportunity!

Apply Now

How to use the Global Action Days Toolkit

Every Girl Scout is part of a special group of girls that stretches not just across the United States, but around the world. Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) is a member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS), which includes 10 million girls in 150 countries. All those girls, in all those countries, are working to make the world a better place.

Throughout the year, girls have the opportunity to work together and participate in Girl Scout programming that relates to different global issues affecting women and girls. This toolkit describes nine international days and is designed to help volunteers engage with Girl Scouts on these global days of action.

The program for each global action day in the toolkit includes:

  •  A description of the day
  • Why Girl Scouts celebrate the day
  • Any program or content notes related to sensitive issues
  • Activities by program grade level (Daisy/Brownie/Junior and Cadette/Senior/Ambassador) and/or activities suitable for all ages
  • Journey and badge connections
  • Suggestions for community service or partnerships
  • Additional resources and references

As girls learn about and explore the issues surrounding a particular day, they may be inspired to engage in community service or even complete a Take Action project. Depending on the program grade
level of the Girl Scouts, these could be used as an option for a Journey Take Action project or lead to a highest award project.
Journey and badge connections are listed for each day of action.

Suggestions for community service are listed in each global action day section, and additional information on different community
service and Take Action projects on page 8. Some activities in this toolkit are applicable to multiple days. It is okay to use the resources
and activities for one day in developing a program for another, similar day.

In addition to this program toolkit, councils will be provided with partnership and social media  resources related to each day on a quarterly basis.

Many of the activities in this toolkit address issues that girls in Girl Scouts face. Be sensitive  to the challenges and experiences of the girls in your troop or group as you explore these topics.

TIPS AND TRICKS

Make sure you have a reasonable understanding of the issue or topic addressed by a global action day before sharing it with girls. We have you covered—you’ll find additional resources and background materials listed in the resources section for each global action day. You don’t have to know everything, but you should have a basic understanding of the topics you’ll be covering and the confidence to look up specific information if girls ask a question to which you don’t know the answer. This shows girls that it’s okay not to be “perfect” and encourages them to learn along with you.

You may also want to ask an expert to share their knowledge and experiences with your troop. Depending on the global action day you are celebrating, this may mean reaching out to a local company or nonprofit organization, university, or government office. For example, on World Environment Day, you might invite an environmental scientist to your meeting to discuss the environment in your community and the way global issues, such as climate change, habitat loss, or natural disasters, have impacted the environment where you live. You may even tap experts within your own personal or professional networks who would love to share their expertise with your troop.

This toolkit includes nine global action days. Don’t try to cover them all, at least not right away. Talk with girls about the days that are most interesting to them, and start with those activities. Some of the days fall quite close together, so you may also want to rotate days through different years. For example, this year you might explore information and communication technology (ICT) topics to participate in Girls in ICT Day, which takes place on the fourth Thursday in April, and next year, you might celebrate Global Action Week for Education, which falls on the third or fourth week in April. Infuse a global perspective in all your activities, not just on these days. Everything we do in Girl Scouts, we do as part of a global sisterhood, 10 million girls strong. When you go hiking or camping, talk with your girls about ways we can all enjoy and protect our planet. When you are volunteering at your local food bank, remember that hunger is a problem everywhere in the world and that by addressing it in your local community, you are helping to solve a global problem. Even when you are just playing, take a moment to remember that all girls enjoy having fun and all girls deserve the opportunity to play. These simple connections remind Girl Scouts that they are part of a community much bigger than themselves.

BUILDING SAFE SPACE

Many of the topics addressed by the days of action in this toolkit can be sensitive and challenging for girls to learn about. At the same time, these issues can deeply motivate girls to take action and create positive change. So it’s critical that girls are able to explore these issues in a safe and supportive environment. Some suggestions for building this safe space within your troop or group meeting are:

  • Let girls and parents know ahead of time what’s on the table for discussion during the meeting. You don’t have to go into the full meeting plan, but it’s a good idea to give them a head’s up so that they can plan and prepare together and you can obtain the necessary permissions, especially if you’ll be addressing sensitive issues. A sample copy of a sensitive issues permission form is found in the appendix of this toolkit.
  • Begin with an icebreaker or trust game, even if group members have known each other for a while. It helps to reinforce a sense of group cohesion.
  • Set a group contract with the girls. This is a good idea to do with any group, regardless of what you’re doing, because it empowers them to discuss and agree on how to treat each other and to establish group norms. Let girls come up with their own rules and discuss them until there is consensus. Some questions you may want to ask girls are:
    • What would make this a safe and respectful place for us to be?
    • What would be good ways to treat each other?
    • What group rules do you have in other places, like at school or in sports? Which ones apply here?
    • How will we make sure we all follow this agreement?
    • Girl Scouts is a girl-led and challenge-by-choice environment.

Make sure girls can opt out if they are uncomfortable or if they need a moment to process. Let them know some good ways to do that, such as going to the bathroom or getting a drink of water. Come up with a signal that girls can use to let you know if they’d like
to talk to you privately about what they’re feeling.

THE ENTIRE GLOBAL ACTION DAYS TOOLKIT CAN BE ACCESSED VIA THE GLOBAL GIRL SCOUT SECTION OF ANYTIME ACTIVITIES: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events/anytime-activities.html

Juniors learn about cybersecurity and earn special patch

Submitted by Natalie Buike

Metro Denver

Aurora

We took a couple of our girls to a park to learn all about cybersecurity. The adults (senders) put together a message on cards that were sent down through the network (long strings of yarn) to each computer (each girl). Once the girls received the message, they had to send it on to the receiver (tree). Once the message made it to the receiver, we had the girls unscramble the message and put it all together. While doing the activity, we explained to the girls how the process works through a real network, just like how a train travels and makes several stops until it stops at its final destination. The parents also explained to the girls how important it is to be as safe as possible with what is sent through email, text, and other social media sites because you never know what information will stop at a computer that can be or has been compromised.

Some of the lessons our girls learned from this activity was that cybersecurity affects just more than a home computer. It is affects phones, tablets, and any other tech devices that can be connected to a network. One of the biggest lessons our girls realized through this is that nothing is really ever safe and that information can always have the potential to be compromised or stolen. The parents really worked on explaining to them that all of the modern day apps like Snapchat and Facebook are not safe and that whatever is posted will always be out there. At the age of 10, I would say that they now have a better understanding on the importance of doing their best to keep their information safe and to always be cautious about what is shared through email, text, social media, apps, etc.

Learn how you (or your troop) can earn this special cybersecurity patch. 

Get your troop outdoors and earn badges for FREE

Girl Scouts of the USA is looking for troops at each Girl Scout level to participate in a research study on the use of outdoor badges, made possible by the Elliott Wildlife Values Project.

What’s Involved

Selected troops will:

  • Be assigned to complete one, two, or three outdoor badges between November 16, 2018 and June 1, 2019. You choose the dates, we choose the number of badges. Troops will be able to choose from a menu of four badges, including camping, environmental stewardship, art in nature, and naturalist badges.
  • Complete and submit to GSUSA a pre- and a post-program survey, or a one-time post-only survey (girls only) after the completion of badge(s). Surveys can be taken on paper or online; survey type will be assigned by GSUSA.
  • Complete an online volunteer survey (leaders only) after the completion of badge(s).

Who Can Participate

  • We are looking for troops at all Girl Scout levels (multi-level welcome).
  • Troops with any level of outdoor experience welcome. No outdoor experience required.
  • Troops that participated in the 2018 outdoor survey pilot study are not eligible.

Benefit to Troops

Participating troops will have the opportunity to help Girl Scouts of the USA understand how our programs benefit girls. Participating troops will also receive all earned badges free of charge!

How to Apply

Interested troops can apply here. A troop leader must complete the entire application by October 31 to be considered.

Brownies earn cybersecurity patch

Submitted by Sheri Wanamaker

Metro Denver

Denver

Girl Scouts from newly formed Brownie Troop 67615, from Denver’s High Tech Elementary School, were introduced to the concept of cybersecurity earlier this month. The girls drew castles and designed security systems. The girls were very creative and included modern biometric security features, such as facial recognition and fingerprint scanning. The girls combined medieval security concepts such as, moats with alligators, dragons, knights, and tall walls with digital security that included usernames, passwords, motion sensors, and video cameras. The girls discussed ways that security affects their daily life when using computers, tablets, smartphones, and keyless entry. The girls are looking forward to more STEM related activities!

Learn how you (or your troop) can earn this special cybersecurity patch. 

Introducing the Global Action Toolkit

Every Girl Scout is part of a special group of girls that stretches not just across the United States, but around the world. Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) is a member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS), which includes 10 million girls in 150 countries. All those girls, in all those countries, are working to make the world a better place.

Throughout the year, girls have the opportunity to work together and participate in Girl Scout programming that relates
to different global issues affecting women and girls. This toolkit describes nine international days and is designed to help volunteers engage with Girl Scouts on these global days of action.

What Is Global Girl Scouting?

Global means relating to the whole world. A global organization is worldwide and international, and from our very beginning, the Girl Guide and Girl Scout Movement has been international in nature.

In 1909, Sir Robert Baden-Powell, founder of the Boy Scouts in the United Kingdom, held the first Boy Scout rally at a park in London called the Crystal Palace. As they gathered, a group of girls marched onto the Crystal Palace and demanded to be able to participate. Seeing the passion and commitment of these girls, Baden-Powell turned to his sister Agnes Baden-Powell to begin the Girl Guide/Girl Scout Movement. Soon after, groups started in the United
Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, New Zealand, and South Africa.

A few years later, in 1912, Juliette Gordon Low met Baden-Powell and discovered her life’s purpose in Girl Scouting. She founded three troops of Girl Guides in London and Scotland before returning to the United States to found Girl Scouts of the USA, and start the first Girl Scout troop in Savannah, Georgia, on March 12, 1912.

From that first meeting of 18 girls, Girl Scouts pushed boundaries—welcoming girls across class, cultural, and ethnic lines to ensure all girls, including those with disabilities, had a place to grow and develop their leadership skills. They played basketball. They hiked, swam, and camped. They learned to read the world around them for instance, earning badges by studying a foreign language or learning to tell time by the stars.

Girl Scouting continued to expand its reach to more and more girls, with the first Girl Scout troops launching outside the United States in China, Syria, and Mexico. Lone Troops on Foreign Soil (now called USA Girl Scouts Overseas) registered its first Girl Scout troop in Shanghai, China, with 18 girls in 1925.6 Today, Girl Scouts of the USA includes 2 million Girl Scouts in 92 countries around the world.
Juliette Gordon Low said it best when she declared, “Girl Scouting and Girl Guiding can be the magic thread which
links the youth of the world together.” For over 100 years, the Girl Scout and Girl Guide Movement has brought girls
together in a global sisterhood to make the world a better place.
There are many ways for girls to engage with this global sisterhood throughout their Girl Scout experience. Whether it
is exploring global issues through a Girl Scout Journey, earning their Global Action award, or traveling with a Girl Scout
Destination, girls can engage with global issues at every program grade level.

This toolkit—for learning about or taking part in nine global action days—is a resource for councils and volunteers to help girls connect to our global Movement and to the issues that affect girls around the world.

Stay tuned for more blog posts about the Global Action Toolkit! Information such as how to use the toolkit and how to celebration each Global Action Day is coming next.

You can access the entire Global Action Days Toolkit under the Global Girl Scout section of Anytime Activities: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events/anytime-activities.html

Questions? Email gscoglobal@gmail.com

New Space Science badges

From Sylvia Acevedo, CEO, Girl Scouts of the USA

I’m so excited about Girl Scouts of the USA’s new Space Science badges for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors, funded by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate through a multi-party collaboration led by the SETI Institute. GSUSA developed each badge with support from the SETI Institute’s subject matter expert partners from the University of Arizona, ARIES Scientific, and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and with the participation of Girl Scouts of Northern California.

Daisies’ Space Science Explorer
Brownies’ Space Science Adventurer
Juniors’ Space Science Investigator badge

Daisies who earn their Space Science Explorer badge examine the sun and moon and look at the night sky. Brownies who pursue their Space Science Adventurer badge dig into the solar system, the phases of the moon, and the constellations, and then share their findings. And Juniors who tackle their Space Science Investigator badge research a planet and develop models that explain celestial motion, the three-dimensional nature of a constellation, and the size and scale of the solar system.

I get so excited thinking about how many girls across the country are right now discovering a passion for space and astronomy just as I did as a young Girl Scout, thanks to Girl Scouts and our incredible partners at NASA!

So on behalf of the entire Girl Scout Movement, I want to congratulate NASA on 60 years of discovery, innovation, and incredible, visionary work. And here’s to the next 60!

Troop needed for flag ceremony

Girl Scouts of the USA’s CEO conference is coming to Denver in November 2018 and Girl Scouts of Colorado needs a troop to perform a flag ceremony! At least four Girl Scouts are needed, and we can easily accommodate a larger group. The troop should be experienced in performing a flag ceremony and comfortable leading the Girl Scout Promise and Law and Pledge of Allegiance in front of a large audience. The flag ceremony will be on Thursday, November 15 between 8 and 8:30 a.m. We understand this is a school day and that may be a problem for some girls and their families. However, this is a wonderful opportunity for girls to strut their stuff in front of every Girl Scout council CEO and board president from across the country.

Interested? Email community partnerships manager Aimee Artzer at aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

Warner Bros. and DC Entertainment team up with Girl Scouts of the USA to inspire and foster the next generation of female entrepreneurs

From Girl Scouts of the USA  

In just a few months, Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) will team up with the DC Super Hero Girls to inspire more girls to participate in the Girl Scout Cookie Program®, the largest girl-led entrepreneurship program in the world. The program gives girls real-world experiences managing money, setting goals, meeting deadlines, learning the basics of marketing to customers, and having fun as they learn and earn. This year, Warner Bros. and DC Entertainment will collaborate with GSUSA to foster the female leaders of tomorrow through the 2019 Cookie Pro contest. Using the power of the DC Super Hero Girls, the contest will inspire Girl Scouts to be smart and courageous as everyday Super Heroes. It will also highlight and reward exceptional cookie bosses who take the lead, set high goals for themselves, bring positive change to their communities, and learn valuable entrepreneurial skills.

To enter, Girl Scouts must use a GSUSA-provided template to create their own mini graphic novel that illustrates a true story about their cookie-selling experience. Girls are also required to answer a set of questions to showcase how they used the skills they learned through Girl Scouts to manage their cookie program. In 2018, close to 25,000 Girl Scouts in all grade levels and from all backgrounds participated in the Cookie Pro contest, and in 2019, that number is expected to double.

24 cookie pros will move on to win the Cookie Entrepreneur Experience of a lifetime. These go-getters—four per Girl Scout grade level—will travel to California for the Cookie Entrepreneur Experience, featuring fun activities; meet-and greet-opportunities with prominent business leaders, a special recognition event, and a VIP tour of Warner Bros. Studios with a behind-the-scenes look at DC Super Hero Girls.

“The Girl Scout Cookie Program gives girls the unique opportunity to build their entrepreneurship skills starting as young as five,” said GSUSA CEO Sylvia Acevedo. “These skills prepare them to succeed in school and their future careers. We’re thrilled that Warner Bros. and DC Entertainment are investing in the future female leaders of our country and helping us acknowledge and reward some of our top entrepreneurs with a unique experience they can only have through Girl Scouts.”

DC Super Hero Girls’ characters inspire girls to be creative, courageous, and inventive, and the cookie pros share these characteristics,” said Pam Lifford, president of Warner Bros. Consumer Products. “We believe that having role models and developing leadership skills at an early age is essential to creating the female leaders of tomorrow, and we’re thrilled to collaborate with Girl Scouts to support girls everywhere.”

Like Girl Scouts who embody the G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ spirit, the award-winning DC Super Hero Girls portray strong, brave, and fierce girls who handle challenges together and help their community. Warner Bros. continues to expand the franchise with the all-new DC Super Hero Girls animated action-comedy series from Warner Bros. Animation. The upcoming series features fresh character designs and storytelling from Girl Scout alum and Emmy® Award–winning producer Lauren Faust (Super Best Friends Forever, My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic, Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends), who has worked throughout her career to improve and increase the representation of women and girls in animation. Through this collaboration, GSUSA and Warner Bros. aim to inspire girls to effect positive change, harness their creativity, and discover their potential.

More than half of Girl Scout alums working in business today credit the Girl Scout Cookie Program with developing the skills they use in their careers. Girl Scouts who participate in the cookie program learn money management, goal setting, public speaking, and more. More than one million Girl Scouts participate in the cookie program each year, and all net revenue from cookie sales stays within a Girl Scout council’s local area to power amazing year-round experiences and opportunities for the girls. Many girls also use their cookie earnings to benefit their communities by investing in local causes; supporting their troop’s community action projects; and giving back to important neighborhood institutions, such as schools and community centers.

The Cookie Pro contest is open to registered Girl Scouts from participating Girl Scout councils taking part in the Girl Scout Cookie Program during the 2018–19 cookie season. The contest will be open for submissions from January 2, 2019, to April 30, 2019. To learn more about the contest and to enter, visit www.girlscouts.org/cookiepro.To join Girl Scouts, visit www.girlscouts.org.

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We’re Girl Scouts of the USA

We’re 2.6 million strong—1.8 million girls and 800,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Georgia, she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. And with programs from coast to coast and across the globe, Girl Scouts offers every girl a chance to practice a lifetime of leadership, adventure, and success. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscouts.org.

About Warner Bros. Consumer Products

Warner Bros. Consumer Products (WBCP), a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company, extends the Studio’s powerful portfolio of entertainment brands and franchises into the lives of fans around the world. WBCP partners with best-in-class licensees globally on an award-winning range of toys, fashion, home décor, and publishing inspired by franchises and properties such as DC, the Wizarding World, Looney Tunes and Hanna-Barbera. The division’s successful global themed entertainment business includes groundbreaking experiences such as The Wizarding World of Harry Potter and Warner Bros. World Abu Dhabi. With innovative global licensing and merchandising programs, retail initiatives, promotional partnerships and themed experiences, WBCP is one of the leading licensing and retail merchandising organizations in the world.

About DC Super Hero Girls Global Franchise

DC Super Hero Girls is an exciting global franchise centered on super heroic storytelling that helps build character and confidence and empowers girls to discover their true potential. Featuring DC’s most powerful and diverse line-up of female characters as relatable teens, the DC Super Hero Girls universe offers immersive experiences in multiple formats including animation, books, toys, apparel, games and more.

About DC Entertainment

DC Entertainment, home to iconic brands DC (Superman, Batman, Green Lantern, Wonder Woman, The Flash), DC Vertigo (Sandman, Fables) and MAD, is the creative division charged with strategically integrating across Warner Bros. and WarnerMedia. DC Entertainment works in concert with many key Warner Bros. divisions to unleash its stories and characters across all media, including but not limited to film, television, consumer products, home entertainment, and interactive games. Publishing thousands of comic books, graphic novels and magazines each year, DC Entertainment is one of the largest English-language publishers of comics in the world.

DC SUPER HERO GIRLS and all related characters and elements © & ™ DC Comics and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. WB SHIELD: TM & © WBEI (S18)

Travel opportunities: GSUSA Convention in Florida and Panama

Submitted by Jody Clair

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Our troop is planning a trip to Florida in October of 2020 to include the Girl Scouts of the USA’s National Convention, along with other fun stuff, such as a visit with Mickey and Harry Potter! You must have completed fifth grade to attend.

A Panama trip is also being planned for those who will be in sixth – twelfth grade. As soon as I have a new date in 2020, I will let you know ASAP!This will include Panama City and learning about the locks and channel as well as working with the Floating Doctors!

At this time, these are Girl Scout trips and I will only be taking names for adults on a first come, first travel basis based on the need for ratios. They are not family trips.

To be added to my email list for either of these trips or if you would like to ask further questions, please email girlscoutjody@gmail.com the following:

  • Girl Scout name
  • Grade now
  • Adult contact email

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.