Tag Archives: Grand Junction

Packing for Impact with Project C.U.R.E.

Join us for Project C.U.R.E. and Packing for Impact this month! Girl Scouts in the Western Colorado and Metro Denver regions will collect basic medical supplies to create kits for Project C.U.R.E. Packing for Impact will have two events, one in Grand Junction on Nov. 12 and one in Denver on Nov. 18. Girls participating in both regions will get a special event patch.

Girl Scout troops in Western Colorado kick off our 2017 Packing for Impact event on Sunday, Nov. 12. Area troops will gather from 1-3 p.m. at the Girl Scout Service Center in Grand Junction to pack their kits, enjoy fun activities, and learn more about Project C.U.R.E. Interested Girl Scouts will want to sign-up for supplies to bring at https://goo.gl/YavfSG . Please sign up quickly as spots are filling fast. A big thank you goes to the Mesa County Service Unit and Troop 10065 for organizing this event and sponsoring kits!

Our Packing for Impact event continues Saturday, Nov. 18 as troops in Metro Denver gather at Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children in downtown Denver to bring their donated supplies and pack kits. Girls will learn more about the countries that Project C.U.R.E. serves, first-aid, and safety through fun activities. There’s still space for this event and volunteer opportunities, but Girl Scouts will want to sign up quickly as this event has sold out quickly in the past. Cost for the Denver Project C.U.R.E. event is $6 per kit. Please note this event’s fee is per kit, not girl. Troops can decide how many kits they would like to donate and pay the fee for those kits. To register, go to https://goo.gl/UJNto5 and choose from three different sessions.

We still have spots for older Girl Scouts to volunteer at the activity tables. This is a great volunteer opportunity for Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors and especially, to fulfill Program Aide internship hours. To volunteer, please go to https://goo.gl/ehzwdj . Questions? Please contact Lori Thompson at lori.thompson@gscolorado.org.

Girl Scouts honors 2017 Western Slope Women of Distinction

Thursday, November 2, 2017, Girl Scouts of Colorado honored the 2017 inductees into the esteemed Women of Distinction program on the Western Slope during a breakfast at Two Rivers Convention Center in Grand Junction. A group of nearly 275 gathered at the event, which raised more than $20,000 for local Girl Scout programs.

This year’s honorees were:

  • Carma Brown, Personal Lines Manager, Home Loan Insurance
  • Sue Conry, Director, Hilltop Home Care
  • Stacey Mascarenas, Community Development Director, Family Health West

These extraordinary women were selected by a committee of their peers led by Selection Chair Susan Alvillar, Woman of Distinction 2015, and chosen based on their contributions to the community, both professionally and personally. They are shining examples of corporate, civic and philanthropic leadership and serve as role models for our female leaders of tomorrow.

The morning’s featured speakers included Gold Award Girl Scout Katie Otto and Silver Award Girl Scout Anela Cronk, who shared their stories of growth and leadership through Girl Scouting. Paula Reece, Woman of Distinction 2016, was this year’s event chair and Betsy Bair, Woman of Distinction 2014, was the event emcee.

The Women of Distinction program began on the Western Slope in 2013. Including this year’s honorees, Girl Scouts of Colorado has recognized 12 other women on the Western Slope with this honor.

Thank you to our Gold Presenting Sponsor: USBank and Silver Presenting Sponsor: Chevron and FCI Constructors, Inc, and to our Media Sponsor: Townsquare Media.

For further information, contact Cindi Graves at cindi.graves@gscolorado.org or (970) 628-8003.

View the event on Flickr.

Think you know Girl Scouts? Think again!

Disappointed by the way Girl Scouts are often portrayed in the media or viewed by the public, Naomi Allen, a go-getter from Grand Junction, took the lead to set the record straight. She wrote the following letter to the editor of her local newspaper, The Daily Sentinel. The letter was published both online and in the paper’s printed edition.

Portrayal of Girl Scouts in editorial was off base

I wanted to point out misinformation in your editorial about the Eagle Scout award and how it relates to the Girl Scouts. I have been a Girl Scout for more than seven years, and I have learned how to tie knots, shoot arrows, taken a cyber-security class at the Grand Junction Police Department and trained with a former female Spartan athlete at Girl Scouting events.

The one and only time I have sewed anything in Girl Scouts is stuffed bears to send to Syrian refugees. Home economics is an incorrect and outdated comparison to what Girl Scouts are like today and, as an active Girl Scout, I was deeply troubled to learn that this is how Girl Scouts are viewed.

The Girl Scout Gold Award is a prestigious award, though less recognized than the Eagle Scout Award. It is an 80-hour award that must be sustainable and benefit the community. Having your Gold Award can earn scholarships, assist with college applications, and automatically puts you one rank higher in the military.

Eagle Scouts may be astronauts, CEOs and powerful politicians, but female Scouts are in positions of power all over the world. The CEO of IBM is a former Girl Scout. Sally Ride, and the majority of female astronauts were Girl Scouts. Five out of six female governors in the United States are former Girl Scouts. And cookies? I’ve sold thousands of dollars worth of cookies, learned money management skills, and cold calling selling skills. We will use that money to go to Costa Rica with my Girl Scout troop where we will be performing local service projects.

Girl Scouts aren’t just cookie-selling little girls. We are strong leaders, CEOs, astronauts, engineers, and, most importantly, we are the future.

NAOMI ALLEN
Grand Junction

Girl Scouts enjoy Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame exhibit

On Saturday, August 26, 2017, Girl Scouts were treated to a presentation by Woman of Distinction and Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame founder M.L. Hanson as she introduced the inspiring stories of some of the extraordinary women who have been inducted into the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame. Their groundbreaking accomplishments, many times overcoming difficult challenges, have been amazing and contributed to enhancing diverse fields of endeavor from the arts and culture to science and technology. Following this was a private self-guided tour and reception. The traveling exhibit is currently housed by the Museum of the West in Grand Junction. Sponsors of this event invited Girl Scouts to learn about some of Colorado’s most influential women throughout history. Girls were able to pose for pictures with M.L. and ask about her personal journey as well as those on display. This is one of those rare opportunities that present themselves to Girl Scouts and makes being a part of our organization impactful on the lives of these girls.

Girl Scouts invited to Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame Exhibit, Special Presentation

Girl Scouts are invited to the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame exhibit and a special presentation August 26, 2017 at the Museum of the West in Grand Junction. M.L. Hanson, CWHF founder, will present Grit & Grace: Great Colorado Women featuring stories of amazing Colorado women in the exhibit.

Girl Scouts can complete a self-guided tour and earn a special Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame Girl Scout patch. More than 30 women in the exhibit are Girl Scout Women of Distinction, so come learn about how these amazing Girl Scouts influenced our great state and made history.

Date: Saturday, Aug. 26, 2017

Schedule:
• 2 p.m. – Grit & Grace presentation
• 3 p.m. – Special tour of the exhibit
• 4 p.m. – Lemonade reception

Registration: Interested Girl Scouts and their families can plan to attend Hanson’s presentation on the 26th. No pre-registration is needed.

Cost: Free

Hanson’s Grit & Grace presentation will introduce the inspiring stories of extraordinary women who have been inducted into the CWHF. Their groundbreaking accomplishments, many times overcoming difficult challenges, have been amazing and contributed to enhancing diverse fields of endeavor from the arts and culture and to science and technology. Hanson’s lecture begins at 2 p.m. at the Whitman Education Center, Museums of the West, directly followed at 3 p.m. by a special tour of the full exhibit, and a cookie and lemonade reception at 4 p.m.

“Women of Excellence: The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame Collection” opened in June in Western Colorado and will run through Labor Day weekend. “Women of Excellence” is a one-of-a-kind presentation of women who are true heroes and shining examples of the potential of all women. Featuring such inductees as Golda Meir, Madeleine Albright, Judy Collins, Baby Doe Tabor, Temple Grandin, and even Chipeta, the exhibition of 152 inductee portraits and profiles honors women who have significantly impacted Colorado, our country, and the world.

About the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame:
The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame was created to recognize, honor, and preserve the contributions of trailblazing Colorado women. Both historical and contemporary women have shared foresight, vision, and accomplishment, but lacked a forum for recognition. Since 1985, the Hall has inducted 152 extraordinary women who have been outstanding in their field, elevated the status of women, helped open new frontiers for women, or inspired others by their example. Inductees include scientists, teachers, social activists, philanthropists, authors, business leaders, elected officials, and more. To learn more about inductees, 
visit: http://www.cogreatwomen.org/inductees/women-in-the-hall/

Volunteer Spotlight: Victoria Gigoux, MCC member

How long have you been a Girl Scout volunteer?

Eight years

How long have you been a member of the MCC?

Three years

What inspired you to join MCC?

I was interested in staying connected and having a voice representing the Western Slope.

What have you learned through being a part of this committee?

I’ve learned that my voice does matter. I feel some of the things I have said and the subcommittees I have been a part of have helped shape the Girl Scout experience for both girls and volunteers.

Why would you recommend being a member of MCC to other GSCO volunteers?

It’s a fulfilling way to keep your finger on the pulse of where GSCO is going and have a voice that might impact that direction

Tell us about yourself. 

I am a full-time-working, mother of three girls; all Girl Scouts. I’ve been married to my husband, Gerald, since 2001.  We live in Grand Junction with our kids, dog, turtle, hamster, chickens, and turkeys and we also board two horses.  Outside of this craziness, I lead two multi-level Girl Scout troops, totaling around 50 girls each year from K-9th. I am a member of the Mesa County Service Unit leadership team and help with the President’s Council , in addition to being on the MCC and a rep to the board.  Outside of Girl Scouts, I volunteer for my sorority, Alpha Chi Omega, as Finance Advisor for our collegiate chapter at CU and as a Province Chair supporting all alumnae chapters in five states, including Colorado.  In my “free” time, I love to read, cook and travel.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is lucky to have a unique governance system with the Membership Connection Committee as the centerpiece of our democratic process and a way to give our members a strong voice in the issues they care most about. Would you like to be a voice for Girl Scouts of Colorado? Speak up and contribute our success together! To reach the MCC, e-mail GSCO.MCC@gscolorado.org

Advice for new leaders from seasoned leaders

Submitted by Allison Ellington, GSCO Volunteer Support Specialist

Western Colorado

Grand Junction

Thoughts from some Western Slope volunteers

Why I volunteer:

• Because I was a Girl Scout and had great experiences

• To help teach girls and support their development in my community

• To make a difference and have fun

• It’s a great way to bond with my daughter and help develop confidence in young girls

• It’s important to role model volunteering and community involvement

• To keep me out of trouble, get new experiences and meet so many people

New skills developed as a Girl Scout volunteer:

• Patience, event planning, conflict resolution, getting on the girl’s level, and teaching the way they learn

• Camping and relating to girls

• Organizational skills

• The importance of delegating

• How to ask for help

• Dealing with diversity

• Learned to be a kid again

• Dealing with lots of different personalities with teenage girls. You can learn A LOT from these girls!

• Still learning

• Leadership and time management

• “I found a hidden confidence in myself that transferred to my job outside of Girl Scouts. I’m able to communicate better and multi-task better which earned me a promotion to a manager! 😊”

What advice would you give to a brand-new volunteer?

• It can be overwhelming at first. Breathe, relax, go at a pace you can handle, and use the help the staff provides. Don’t be afraid to ask questions and ask for help!

• Don’t stress about being perfect

• Go to the trainings before you start

• Get your training, ask for help, and network with other leaders

• Remember, these girls are here to have fun while learning

• Be open-minded and have fun

• Reach out to other leaders – they have been through the same things you are going through

• Ask for parent volunteers – even for the small things

• Tap into the other leaders for information

• Attend trainings and service unit meetings! Meet other leaders and network for collaboration and ideas.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scouts lead the way on the Older Girl Advisory Board

Submitted by Anela C.

Western Colorado

Grand Junction

As an older Girl Scout, it takes a lot of dedication and perseverance to make it to this level, so it is no wonder the majority of girls who do have amazing leadership and problem solving skills, not to mention empathy and a great sense of responsibility. These are the traits that make a great Older Girl Advisory Board (OGAB) representative. As a representative, you get to take part in developing new programs and help to revitalize old ones. Over the past year on OGAB, I have helped to create an older girl newsletter, brainstormed ways to keep Juliette Girl Scouts involved, previewed the newest outdoor adventure badges, and in our upcoming August retreat, I will be meeting with the GSCO Highest Awards manager to review GSCO’s Highest Awards program. Being an OGAB representative is a great way to affect your own and others’ Girl Scout experience, but it is also a great opportunity to meet other like-minded girls from all across the state and get to share your experiences and opinions. The OGAB positions are each held for two years and there are monthly web-conferences and four in-person weekend retreats at Girl Scout Camp, such as Tomahawk Ranch and Twisted Pine. It is a great experience and I can’t wait to meet the newest representatives.

The Older Girl Advisory Board, also known as OGAB, is a group of 14 girls in grades 9-12 from across Colorado. Members provide feedback on projects ranging from mentoring to program development to older girl engagement to product sales. OGAB is currently recruiting new members in Pueblo, Western Slope/Southwest Colorado, and Metro Denver. Girls entering grades 9-12 for the 2017/2018 school year are encouraged to apply here: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/ogab2017. Contact Katie Singleton with any questions and find more info on our webpage.

 

 

See the “Great Russian Nutcracker” in December

Moscow Ballet will bring its 25th Anniversary North American tour to Denver’s Paramount Theatre on December 8 and 9, 2017 with three performances of its acclaimed Great Russian Nutcracker. They will have a performance in Grand Junction at the Avalon on Monday, December 11. Girl Scouts are invited to attend at discounted rates and receive a free fun patch with purchase of ticket. For a group of 25 or more (including chaperones, friends, and siblings), there will be a meet-and-greet with one of the dancers.

I’m Bobbie Fachini, Market Manager for Moscow Ballet. I had the chance to talk to the company’s co-founder and choreographer, Mary Talmi, about her experiences bringing international ballet to the United States and Canada.

BF: What was that first show like, 25 years ago? Where was it and how different was it than the show 250,000 patrons will see this year?

MT: The first show was very exciting. We started the six city tour in Reading, PA. At that time, if you wanted to see a Russian ballet company perform you had to travel to NYC or Washington, DC. We were one of the first groups to bring Russian ballet to smaller cities, so there was a great deal of anticipation. The interest is even greater now. Americans love dance and it is widely known that Russian ballet dancers are among the best in the world.

BF: You’re a choreographer. What is it like to envision these pieces and watch some of the world’s best dancers bring your vision to life on stage?

MT: I love working with these beautiful dancers. They can do just about anything you give them and they are hungry for new ideas. We have added new characters, props, and puppets to the traditional Russian choreography. The dancers have embraced the changes and that is very rewarding. This production is now a visual treat as well as great dance.

BF: What’s your favorite scene in Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker and why?

MT: The Dance of the Snowflakes, or Winter Forest, is my favorite. Everything about it is gorgeous, the white and silver tutus, the lighting, and the dancers in precise formations is thrilling.

BF: Do you have any advice for children who want to dance professionally, or be more involved in the arts?

MT: My hope for children is that they can experience the arts as self-expression and fun… and as an exploration of what makes us human. I hope that they can bring a curiosity to their experiences that opens them up to what is possible in their own lives.

Learn more about Mary here:
http://www.nutcracker.com/about-us/directors

Troops can sign up for Girl Scout tickets here:
http://www.nutcracker.com/buy-tickets/girl-scout-groups

The contact for the performance in Grand Junction is tim@nutcracker.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Cookie connoisseurs at Aspen St. Regis

Submitted by Cindi Graves

Western Colorado

Grand Junction

The Aspen St. Regis hotel was host to girls from Troop 13723 of Aspen and Troop 10065 of Grand Junction who acted as judges for a Girl Scout cookie dessert making contest. The St. Regis launched their inaugural Camp Astor, inspired by founder John Jacob Astor IV and his love for Lake St. Regis in upstate New York, as a summer offering packed with outdoor adventures. This event provided a sampling of the camp to a select party of journalists. Part of the fun was competing for the coveted “golden whisk” by creating the most mouthwatering dessert using Girl Scout Cookies as an ingredient. The girls, as a panel of cookie connoisseurs, examined, tasted, and deliberated as a group to determine the winner based on presentation, taste, and use of the cookie. The girls and their families were treated to a fabulous outdoor feast, tutorial on sabering champagne, and a sing-a-long by the pool, all with the beautiful backdrop of Aspen. Director of Marketing Jessica Young was a Girl Scout as a girl and when envisioning a camp event, thought it would be incomplete without Girl Scouts. We had a great time and hope to do more with our new friends at the St. Regis.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.