Tag Archives: Grand Junction

Advice for new leaders from seasoned leaders

Submitted by Allison Ellington, GSCO Volunteer Support Specialist

Western Colorado

Grand Junction

Thoughts from some Western Slope volunteers

Why I volunteer:

• Because I was a Girl Scout and had great experiences

• To help teach girls and support their development in my community

• To make a difference and have fun

• It’s a great way to bond with my daughter and help develop confidence in young girls

• It’s important to role model volunteering and community involvement

• To keep me out of trouble, get new experiences and meet so many people

New skills developed as a Girl Scout volunteer:

• Patience, event planning, conflict resolution, getting on the girl’s level, and teaching the way they learn

• Camping and relating to girls

• Organizational skills

• The importance of delegating

• How to ask for help

• Dealing with diversity

• Learned to be a kid again

• Dealing with lots of different personalities with teenage girls. You can learn A LOT from these girls!

• Still learning

• Leadership and time management

• “I found a hidden confidence in myself that transferred to my job outside of Girl Scouts. I’m able to communicate better and multi-task better which earned me a promotion to a manager! 😊”

What advice would you give to a brand-new volunteer?

• It can be overwhelming at first. Breathe, relax, go at a pace you can handle, and use the help the staff provides. Don’t be afraid to ask questions and ask for help!

• Don’t stress about being perfect

• Go to the trainings before you start

• Get your training, ask for help, and network with other leaders

• Remember, these girls are here to have fun while learning

• Be open-minded and have fun

• Reach out to other leaders – they have been through the same things you are going through

• Ask for parent volunteers – even for the small things

• Tap into the other leaders for information

• Attend trainings and service unit meetings! Meet other leaders and network for collaboration and ideas.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scouts lead the way on the Older Girl Advisory Board

Submitted by Anela C.

Western Colorado

Grand Junction

As an older Girl Scout, it takes a lot of dedication and perseverance to make it to this level, so it is no wonder the majority of girls who do have amazing leadership and problem solving skills, not to mention empathy and a great sense of responsibility. These are the traits that make a great Older Girl Advisory Board (OGAB) representative. As a representative, you get to take part in developing new programs and help to revitalize old ones. Over the past year on OGAB, I have helped to create an older girl newsletter, brainstormed ways to keep Juliette Girl Scouts involved, previewed the newest outdoor adventure badges, and in our upcoming August retreat, I will be meeting with the GSCO Highest Awards manager to review GSCO’s Highest Awards program. Being an OGAB representative is a great way to affect your own and others’ Girl Scout experience, but it is also a great opportunity to meet other like-minded girls from all across the state and get to share your experiences and opinions. The OGAB positions are each held for two years and there are monthly web-conferences and four in-person weekend retreats at Girl Scout Camp, such as Tomahawk Ranch and Twisted Pine. It is a great experience and I can’t wait to meet the newest representatives.

The Older Girl Advisory Board, also known as OGAB, is a group of 14 girls in grades 9-12 from across Colorado. Members provide feedback on projects ranging from mentoring to program development to older girl engagement to product sales. OGAB is currently recruiting new members in Pueblo, Western Slope/Southwest Colorado, and Metro Denver. Girls entering grades 9-12 for the 2017/2018 school year are encouraged to apply here: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/ogab2017. Contact Katie Singleton with any questions and find more info on our webpage.

 

 

See the “Great Russian Nutcracker” in December

Moscow Ballet will bring its 25th Anniversary North American tour to Denver’s Paramount Theatre on December 8 and 9, 2017 with three performances of its acclaimed Great Russian Nutcracker. They will have a performance in Grand Junction at the Avalon on Monday, December 11. Girl Scouts are invited to attend at discounted rates and receive a free fun patch with purchase of ticket. For a group of 25 or more (including chaperones, friends, and siblings), there will be a meet-and-greet with one of the dancers.

I’m Bobbie Fachini, Market Manager for Moscow Ballet. I had the chance to talk to the company’s co-founder and choreographer, Mary Talmi, about her experiences bringing international ballet to the United States and Canada.

BF: What was that first show like, 25 years ago? Where was it and how different was it than the show 250,000 patrons will see this year?

MT: The first show was very exciting. We started the six city tour in Reading, PA. At that time, if you wanted to see a Russian ballet company perform you had to travel to NYC or Washington, DC. We were one of the first groups to bring Russian ballet to smaller cities, so there was a great deal of anticipation. The interest is even greater now. Americans love dance and it is widely known that Russian ballet dancers are among the best in the world.

BF: You’re a choreographer. What is it like to envision these pieces and watch some of the world’s best dancers bring your vision to life on stage?

MT: I love working with these beautiful dancers. They can do just about anything you give them and they are hungry for new ideas. We have added new characters, props, and puppets to the traditional Russian choreography. The dancers have embraced the changes and that is very rewarding. This production is now a visual treat as well as great dance.

BF: What’s your favorite scene in Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker and why?

MT: The Dance of the Snowflakes, or Winter Forest, is my favorite. Everything about it is gorgeous, the white and silver tutus, the lighting, and the dancers in precise formations is thrilling.

BF: Do you have any advice for children who want to dance professionally, or be more involved in the arts?

MT: My hope for children is that they can experience the arts as self-expression and fun… and as an exploration of what makes us human. I hope that they can bring a curiosity to their experiences that opens them up to what is possible in their own lives.

Learn more about Mary here:
http://www.nutcracker.com/about-us/directors

Troops can sign up for Girl Scout tickets here:
http://www.nutcracker.com/buy-tickets/girl-scout-groups

The contact for the performance in Grand Junction is tim@nutcracker.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Cookie connoisseurs at Aspen St. Regis

Submitted by Cindi Graves

Western Colorado

Grand Junction

The Aspen St. Regis hotel was host to girls from Troop 13723 of Aspen and Troop 10065 of Grand Junction who acted as judges for a Girl Scout cookie dessert making contest. The St. Regis launched their inaugural Camp Astor, inspired by founder John Jacob Astor IV and his love for Lake St. Regis in upstate New York, as a summer offering packed with outdoor adventures. This event provided a sampling of the camp to a select party of journalists. Part of the fun was competing for the coveted “golden whisk” by creating the most mouthwatering dessert using Girl Scout Cookies as an ingredient. The girls, as a panel of cookie connoisseurs, examined, tasted, and deliberated as a group to determine the winner based on presentation, taste, and use of the cookie. The girls and their families were treated to a fabulous outdoor feast, tutorial on sabering champagne, and a sing-a-long by the pool, all with the beautiful backdrop of Aspen. Director of Marketing Jessica Young was a Girl Scout as a girl and when envisioning a camp event, thought it would be incomplete without Girl Scouts. We had a great time and hope to do more with our new friends at the St. Regis.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Night with the Grand Junction Rockies

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Save the date for Girl Scout Night with the Grand Junction Rockies on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017! The Rockies are generously offering free entry to Girl Scouts who come to the game in uniform. All Girl Scouts, friends, and family are invited.

Friends and family can purchase tickets at the box office before the game. We’ll have more information closer to the game on how to purchase tickets for our Girl Scout section.

To help us plan, so the Grand Junction Rockies can set aside seats for our Girl Scout families, please let us know if you are interested at this link – www.SignUpGenius.com/go/904044BADA72AA57-girl2 . This does not obligate you to come, but does help us plan, so thank you for sharing your interest.

Game start is planned for 5 p.m. Questions? Please contact Lori Thompson at lori.thompson@gscolorado.org. We hope to see you and your Girl Scouts there!

Centennial Celebration in Grand Junction

More than 150 Girl Scouts, friends, and family gathered on Saturday, April 29, 2017 in Grand Junction to celebrate 100 years of Girl Scouting in Colorado at the third in a series of Centennial Campfire celebrations. A final celebration will be held May 21 at Meadow Mountain Ranch near Rocky Mountain National Park.

Girl Scouts participated in a “passport” full of fun activities, including archery with Cabela’s, crafts with GSCO camp directors Obi Joe and Ruddy, a scavenger hunt, and fun with sidewalk chalk. The National Park Service was on-hand to teach girls history about the Colorado National Monument, and the GSCO shop was there with all kinds of merchandise celebrating the centennial.

Each Girl Scout in attendance also had the opportunity to meet GSCO President and CEO, Stephanie A. Foote.

All Girl Scouts who attended received a free, fun patch honoring 100 years of Girl Scouting in Colorado. The first Girl Scout troop in Colorado got started in 1917 in the Colorado Springs area.

Bronze and Silver Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Grand Junction

Nearly one hundred Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction on April 30, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2016-17 Girl Scout awards program year, more than 1,000 girls across the state and 35 on the Western Slope and in Southwestern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. Over the last year, nine girls on the Western Slope and in Southwestern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

Shauna Clemmer, a Gold Award recipient, and current Gold Award Mentor for the Western Slope, served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked about her own journey in Girl Scouts and wished all the girls the best in their pursuit of the highest achievements in Girl Scouting.

Sandy Jackson, a First Class recipient, current Gold Award Mentor, and Professor of Anthropology, Archaeology, and Sustainable Studies at Colorado Mountain College served as the keynote speaker. She spoke about her experiences in Girl Scouting from earning her First Class (what we now call the Gold Award), recycling and planting trees, to traveling the world and visiting Our Cabaña, one of the WAGGS World Centers in Mexico.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

 

Girl Scouts announces 2017 Western Slope Women of Distinction: Three Extraordinary Women Honored

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This year’s honorees were selected by a committee of their peers led by Selection Chair Susan Alvillar, Manager, Community Relations, Terra Energy Partners, Woman of Distinction ‘15, and chosen based on their contributions to the community, both professionally and personally. They are shining examples of corporate, civic, and philanthropic leadership and serve as role models for our female leaders of tomorrow.

  • Carma Brown, Personal Lines Manager at Home Loan Insurance
  • Sue Conry, Director at Hilltop Home Care
  • Stacey Mascarenas, Community Development Director for Family Health West

Since 2012, including this year’s honorees, Girl Scouts of Colorado has recognized 15 women on the Western Slope as Women of Distinction. The Women of Distinction program brings together a group of women dedicated to raising funds to support Girl Scout leadership programs.

Girl Scouts of Colorado will publicly honor these inductees on Nov. 2, 2017 at the annual Women of Distinction Breakfast. This year’s event will be held at the Two Rivers Convention Center. The 2017 Event Chair is Paula Reece, Marketing Director, Crossroads Fitness, Woman of Distinction ’16.

Event Sponsors include: Gold Presenting Sponsor, US Bank, and Silver Presenting Sponsor, Chevron.

For information regarding tickets and sponsorships, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/wodgj or contact Cindi Graves at 970-628-8003 or cindi.graves@gscolorado.org.

 

Honoring the Girl Scout volunteer in your girl’s life

Submitted by Victoria Gigoux, Membership Connection Committee Member

Western Slope

Grand Junction

As Girl Scout volunteers, we are all aware of the countless hours of time we give to girls in Colorado and if you’ve ever asked “What’s the value of being a volunteer,” the answer just might surprise you!

According to Independent Sector, the estimated value of volunteer time, is just under $24.00 per hour. For many devoted volunteers, that could add up to a significant “gift” in a year, and much more sizeable over a lifetime.  Just as monetary donors get recognition for their generosity, so should volunteers who give of their time and talent, as well.

Do you have someone you need to thank?  Then, there’s no time like the present.  April is Volunteer Appreciation Month and while there are many options for formally recognizing and showing appreciation for outstanding volunteers who go above and beyond, in most cases, it’s simple peer-to-peer appreciation and genuine gestures that count the most.

A volunteer who feels they are doing a worthwhile job and feels appreciated for it, is more likely to continue to help out.  So, how can you express genuine appreciation to your volunteers, such as a co-leader, Service Unit Manager or Cookie Parent?  Although there are countless ways to say thanks, unless you have your own “Volunteer Appreciation Committee” (lucky!), it’s going to fall on you to keep your gratitude fresh and creative.

Here are ten ways to recognize, and show gratitude for, volunteers that you can incorporate into your menu of peer-to-peer kudos:

  • Tell your volunteers frequently that they are doing a good job – Although you shouldn’t forget to come up with some creative ways to formally say thanks, don’t overlook the power of a simple THANK YOU!  This can be verbally, or a simple handwritten note.
  • Thank You Box – Set out a box and index cards in a high traffic area. As people come and go, they can write a special message for the volunteer and put it in the box. Empty the box regularly and give these messages to your volunteer.
  • Spread the word – Put message of appreciation and photos on your website, in a troop newsletter and/or post them on your social media.
  • Remember holidays, birthdays and milestones – These are times volunteers will be likely be reflecting/thinking most on what they do and why, so let them know you are also thinking about them.
  • Small Gifts of Gratitude – Who doesn’t like gifts? Even something as small as a $5 Starbucks gift card is appreciated.  It shows effort and lets the volunteer know you were thinking of them at a time outside of Girl Scout time.  Tight on funds….ask parents to donate to your “appreciation” fund or reach out to shops in your community – you never know what you can get at a discount (or FREE!) if you don’t ask.
  • Share a Gift of Love – Ask those served, such as girls and parents, to make personal gifts. Art work, baked goods, poems, the possibilities are endless and a way to get girls and families involved.
  • Go Out Together – Go somewhere together, where you aren’t doing your “job” but have an opportunity to build on your relationships. This can be something as simple as a pot luck or Leader’s Night Out. You know what will work for your group of volunteers,  just pick a date and go!
  • Create a Scrapbook. Have co-leaders, parents, and girls write comments and quotes about the difference volunteers make and put them in a book. Add photos! If you aren’t crafty, there are many online places that can create wonderful keepsakes at reasonable prices.  This is an especially lovely gift for a volunteer who has reached a significant milestone, such as years of service.
  • Send a letter of thanks and recognition to the volunteer’s employer. Do your volunteers work outside of volunteering? This is an excellent to show your volunteer you appreciate them and their time, especially when some of the donated time has been during regular business hours, courtesy of the employer.  It also speaks to the volunteer’s integrity and work ethic.
  • Send a letter of thanks to the volunteer’s family – We all know how giving of our time affects the time we spend with our own families. Don’t ever neglect the family; this group of “forgotten volunteers”!   If a volunteer’s family recognizes the value of the time sacrificed, they are more likely to continue to encourage the volunteer to give of their time. And maybe, just maybe, you build on your volunteer pool!

Remember, recognition should be appropriate for the amount of donated time, the duties performed and the recipient’s unique personality.  And, don’t fret, it’s not the cost of the recognition that matters.  Don’t forget, in most cases, girls are who benefit the most from this dedication of time and should be involved in the process of showing appreciation.  So… get your girls (and families) involved, too!

Still looking for ways to show appreciation, there are other suggestions, resources and additional formal options too.  These can be found at http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/for-volunteers/volunteer-appreciation.html

Want to know more about how to connect with the MCC?  Check us out on the GSCO website:  http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/about-girl-scouts/membership-connection-committee.html

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

 

 

Girl Scout Gold Award Honoree briefs Commissioners

Submitted by Stephanie Reecy

Western Colorado

Grand Junction

In a public hearing on Feb. 27, 2017, Sarah Griechen, founder of the Score-A-Friend Inc., and Colorado Girl Scouts 2016 Gold Award honoree, spoke to the Mesa County Commissioners about her foundation, which helps schools create clubs for kids with disabilities

Inspired by her twin brother who has an autism spectrum disorder,  Sarah started a non-profit organization, “Score a Friend,” to promote and support youth to lead school-based unified clubs for students of all abilities to access sports, electives, and friendship.

Sarah was also one out of ten young women named National Young Woman of Distinction by Girl Scouts of the USA, a prestigious nationwide honor.

Sarah told the Mesa County Commissioners she wants everyone to feel welcome and valued. Her foundation fosters inclusive groups and extracurricular activities for kids with disabilities to find friendship and community.

Earlier this year, Sarah also received the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence. Sarah was given this award because of her ongoing impact and leadership skills.

After her briefing, the Board of Mesa County Commissioner presented Sarah with a Certificate of Recognition for being an exemplary young woman who demonstrates innovation, and whose motivational involvement has improved schools and communities across the nation.

For more information on Score A Friend, watch https://youtu.be/WJysLc-_nPQ

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.