Tag Archives: Golden

Daisies learn coding with Snapology

Submitted by Marcie Tidd

Metro Denver

Golden-Littleton

Daisy Troop 66565 met with volunteers from Snapology of Golden-Littleton for a fun LEGO-based STEM activity. Girls worked in teams to build and code fireflies. This was a fun and engaging activity, which exposed girls to concepts in engineering, coding, and computer science.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Catherine Bendl

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Catherine Bendl of Golden in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Catherine to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer because my girls were interested in trying Girl Scouts and I wanted to make sure their experience was a good one. Now that I’m a troop leader, I appreciate those volunteers who help to make events and outings possible because they are willing to help.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I am currently troop leader for our Cadette troop. It is such a rewarding experience and I’m so glad I took the leap to start a troop. Watching these older girls connect is so wonderful! Previously, I volunteered as an adult member of troops and helped with overnights, cookie sales, badge work, and meeting prep.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that volunteering is usually so easy and ends up being so worth it in the end. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned that giving time to help others is a vital part of what makes us successful people. I hope that they see that giving of yourself brings joy to others and to self.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I started my own business just before we started the new troop last fall. This experience has helped me to pursue my business in going after new clients and taking risks doing tasks I’ve never done before. I hope by making my business successful that the girls will learn that being a leader is a positive thing and will help them in the future. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

Christina Bear’s message to Colorado Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts

Gold Award Girl Scout Christina Bear is the first recipient of Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence. In 2015, Christina earned the Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts, for organizing a week-long technology program for Latino students at Horizons Summer Program at Colorado Academy. Through informal learning in computer and robot programming and mini-science experiments, students were engaged and excited about technology. Later that year, she was awarded the Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy Award presented by the Association of Fundraising Professionals. Now a student at Harvard University, Christina has a special message to Colorado Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts.

My name is Christina Bear and I am the first Girl Scout to receive the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize  for Gold Award Excellence. Thank you GSCO and thank you Ms. Foote.

There are three pillars of this award that I see every single day.

  1. Excellence. It constantly inspires me to be the best I can be no matter what I do.
  2. Community impact no matter how small or big.
  3. Networking with people having different skill sets and sharing my very own skill sets to be stronger and better as a team.

I attend Harvard University and I’m a junior majoring in Computer Science. My favorite class: CS50. After my freshman year, I was invited to be a Teaching Fellow and I’ve done that for two years. Girl Scouts gave me many opportunities to teach and having confidence to teach makes it smoother.

After my freshman year, I went to Paris and worked with a team of students in an Urban Biology summer elective to find a solution for refugees in Paris who need access to water for bathing and hygiene. From the get go, I led my team to truly create impact for a global challenge. We had to work hard to make our project sustainable (bubblebox.com). I’m happy to share with you our community project won a grant of 25000 euros to further our prototype and I am networking with the engineering department here at Harvard to bring the prototype to fruition. My skills from Girl Scouts of organization, team building, and communication have sure come in handy!

This summer, I will be doing an internship at Facebook. It was like preparing for my Gold Award. Interview skills, resumes, business cards, thank you emails, and follow up letters – all these skills I learned at Girl Scouts came to help me in searching for my internship.

Ms. Foote, the staff members, and Board of Directors of GSCO, and my Gold Award mentor, Ms. RaeAnn Dougherty, I want to thank you. You have given me the gift of empowerment and shown me the importance of community impact which for me has now taken on a global scope.

To all Gold Girl Scouts, Silver, and Bronze, your hard work makes a difference in our community. Grow yourself to be the best you can be. Believe in yourself and trust in your skills set. I am incredibly proud of you!

Volunteer Spotlight: Marie Williams

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Marie Williams of Golden in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Marie to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer in 2016, when my daughter Caley started kindergarten, because it was a great opportunity for us to spend meaningful time together. We have fun, explore new things, and learn important life lessons. I have stayed a volunteer — and gotten more involved — for those same reasons, and also because I have found personal fulfillment in my volunteer work. Working with girls, and seeing them learn and grow, fills me with pride and is one of the ways I am making the world a better place.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I am currently a troop leader and troop cookie manager for my daughter’s second-grade Brownie troop; the service unit manager and service unit product program manager for Hills and Dales in Golden; and I serve on the Membership Connection Committee. I have been a troop leader since the beginning, along with my fabulous co-leader, Courtney Fox. I took on the service unit manager role in 2017 because our area did not have an operating service unit, and I saw the huge potential in having experienced leaders as a resource for all of our newer leaders. We continue to work on growing our service unit to make it a source of help and inspiration for all. I took on the product program roles in 2017 because I had a vision of how to make them run more smoothly. Most recently, I joined the Membership Connection Committee last fall because it allows me to communicate feedback between GSCO and the Girl Scouts in my area, and also allows me to contribute to the discussion about and development of our Girl Scouting program for the future. (And I also work full-time and have a three-year-old son, if you were wondering!)

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Though not a new lesson, my Girl Scout volunteer work reminds me of the incredible diversity of life experiences and personalities in the world, including in a group of seven-year-olds! I have learned that, although not every girl’s family can contribute as much time as I can, they all have something important to contribute to the girls’ experience. One of the most important jobs I have as a leader is to bring together their diverse talents and experiences for the benefit of all of our daughters. I also have learned that, when you truly love what you are doing, it never feels like a burden. Even during those dark days of cookie booth sales when you can’t figure out where that other case of Thin Mints went, it is merely a task to be completed, and not something that weighs on you. I am passionate about the Girl Scout experience, and committed to seeking out new ways for all girls to benefit from it.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls are learning a ton! My co-leader and I work hard to provide our girls with a variety of creative opportunities to learn about the world around them. With our girls in second grade, our primary focus is on exposing them to things they might not learn about in school or in daily home life. Whether we’re building roller coasters or race cars for a STEM badge; exploring different arts through pottery, painting, and performing; climbing a rock wall; camping for the first time; learning how to talk to our cookie customers; stocking donated food on the shelves at a food pantry; or visiting a hangar at Centennial Airport and learning about Flight for Life — we’re showing them the vast opportunities available to them in their world. And throughout, we emphasize the specific lines of the Girl Scout Law. More than just something to memorize, we want it to be something they understand and live by.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

The biggest change I’ve seen is that my volunteer experience has made me a more confident innovator. In both our troop and our service unit, if I see something that’s not working, I have the freedom to try new things, experiment, and find something that works better. Through these experiences, I have become more confident in my abilities to develop solutions that work for groups of all sizes.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Emma Conroy, Golden, “Educational Video called ‘EEGs Made Easy'”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created an educational video explaining how to have an EEG (anelectroencephalogramused) to diagnose epilepsy. It is a step-by-step video explaining exactly what happens in a humorous way, so kids aren’t scared by the process.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience? 

I know that I reached the 40 people that came to my launch party, 20 people from my diagnostic community, at least 350 people on Facebook, and the 35 people at the Epilepsy Foundation’s open house. I currently have over 1,000 views on the video. I also have nine comments on the actual video. I have received comments from the epilepsy community such as:

“This video is so accurate, I wish there was a video like this when I was a kid.” – An adult at the Epilepsy foundation open house

“You covered exactly what happens.”- Katie (living with epilepsy)

“This has been so much help.”- Jean (working at the Epilepsy Foundation).

“It was just like the EEGs I’ve had.” – Grace (a girl living with epilepsy)

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

This project is very sustainable because it is posted on the Internet via YouTube and everyone knows the Internet is forever.  It is also posted on the Epilepsy Foundation’s website, and Children’s Hospital. People will be able to continue to access it, and my partners will continue to spread the word. In addition, my neurologist Dr. Chapman will continue to direct people to the video, and the Epilepsy Foundation is handing out more than 500 business cards to newly diagnosed kids and adults to spread the word. I am also working with my pediatrician, Dr. Sorenna Kirkegard, at Kaiser Permanente to insure they use it for patient education as well.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

On a global scale, it can impact people all over the world because YouTube has subtitles, so people will know what is happening no matter which language they speak.

What did you learn about yourself? 

I learned that I wanted to ease the fears of children going into a frightening procedure.  As a child I had to have many EEGs and it was scary because the first one was when I was three-years-old.  I knew what others would feel going into have their first EEG and wanted to make sure that they didn’t feel how I felt. By doing this, I learned that I have to pick music that is funny, so even if what is happening isn’t amusing at least the music is. I learned that I wanted to help kids who are worried and so in order to make that happen, I had to show up to meetings with strangers like my advisor and representatives from the Epilepsy Foundation.  I had to be on time and professionally dressed.  I had to make phone calls.  I learned how to get back up when something had to be pushed back or cut out altogether. I gained communication skills that had I not done my Gold Award, I would not know. And one of the most important things I learned was time management, I needed to set deadlines and budget my time to make it possible to reach that deadline.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Since starting my Gold Award project, I have learned many valuable skills that I can use in the future including time management, good communication, perseverance, and self-confidence.  I can learn on the fly, like downloading a film editing program and watching myself on tape.   I will know what is expected of me in the future because of my Gold Award.  I will know what to do when entering a job interview and how to move on when something doesn’t go according to plan.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The decision to try for my Gold Award was an important part of my experience.  It goes above and beyond what the average Girl Scout does, and helps people not only on a community scale, but also on a national or global scale which helps make the world a better place. I wanted to earn it because it pushed me farther than I would have pushed myself. When I posted my video, I had the hope that it would get 100 views and now it’s been viewed over 1,000 times and it continues to grow. I hope that other Girl Scouts get their Gold Award because it introduces new challenges and you learn more about what you are capable of doing.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I took a big risk earning my Gold Award because I am not very tech savvy and I am an introvert, so being in front of a camera and having to edit what I did to make it look presentable was very challenging. I could have done a project that was better suited to my skill sets, but I saw a problem and wanted to fix it, so I took a risk to help others even though it may not have been easy for me. Deciding to pursue gold makes me a go-getter.  Deciding on an education video was innovative for me.  Delegating tasks to my troop and working with various agencies and CBS4 News definitely look leadership skills that I had to learn as I went along. Earning my Gold Award was a challenge I set for myself and I did not know all the things it would teach me along the way.  I am very happy I was able to rise and complete the goal I set for myself.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scouts Information Night – Golden

Please join us to learn all about what it means to be a Girl Scout, and the wonderful volunteer opportunities available. Inviting K-12th grade girls and an adult to learn more. New troops are forming today!

As a Girl Scout, your girl will practice leadership with grit like a go-getter, problem solve like an innovator, embrace challenges like a risk-taker, and show empathy like a leader—in an all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment where she can feel free to let her full, magnificent personality shine through every single time.

Event will take place on Tuesday,  January 29th from 5:00-6:00pm at Welchester Elementary, 13000 W 10th Ave, Golden, CO 80401.

To start your girls’ membership with Girl Scout of Colorado visit: www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/join

Girl Scouts Information Night – Golden

Please join us to learn all about what it means to be a Girl Scout, and the wonderful volunteer opportunities available. Inviting K-12th grade girls and an adult to learn more. New troops are forming today!

As a Girl Scout, your girl will practice leadership with grit like a go-getter, problem solve like an innovator, embrace challenges like a risk-taker, and show empathy like a leader—in an all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment where she can feel free to let her full, magnificent personality shine through every single time.

Event will take place on Thursday,  January 24th from 5:00-6:00pm at the Fairmount Elementary, 15975 W 50th Ave, Golden, CO 80403

To start your girls’ membership with Girl Scout of Colorado visit: www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/join

Girls Lead the Way conference at Colorado School of Mines

Help us spread the word for this year’s Girls Lead the Way leadership conference hosted by the Society of Women Engineers collegiate and professional sections at Colorado School of Mines!

During the conference, high school girls (grades 9-12) will interact with current Mines students and faculty in three, hour-long engineering and/or applied math and sciences activities designed to engage students with Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) majors at Mines. The event also includes a majors panel, where the girls will hear highlights of each major from department representatives, a parents/guardians’ information session hosted by Mines Undergraduate Admissions (optional), and a campus tour (optional).

This year’s theme, “Boldly Go Where No Woman Has Gone Before,” reflects the conference’s goal of empowering young women with the knowledge that they are capable of pursuing and thriving in STEM education and careers.

When:

Saturday, February 2, 2019

9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

(check-in begins at 8:30 a.m.)

(optional campus tour 3:30 – 4:30 p.m.)

Where: 

Colorado School of Mines

Student Center

1200 16th St.

Golden, CO 80401

Register today! Open until January 14, 2019 or when 200 registrants is reached. A waitlist will be added once capacity is met.

https://apply.mines.edu/register/GLTW2019

Cost – $30 per student

This covers a continental breakfast, lunch, and activities supplies.
There is no charge to parents/guardians for the optional sessions. Lunch is not included for parents/guardians.

We do not want program cost to be a barrier for participation. There are a limited number of scholarships available to cover the cost of this event. If you have a girl(s) in mind who could benefit from this scholarship, please contact Kelly Knechtel at knechtel@mines.edu , SWE Faculty Advisor at Mines, by Friday, December 14, 2018 for a code that can be entered on the registration form.

We look forward to interacting with your high school Girl Scouts on campus in February!

Girl Scout Engineering Day

Girl Scout Engineering Day

Saturday, November 10, 2018

9 a.m. – Noon

Colorado School of Mines – Ben Parker Student Center

$10/girl

Register at: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/girl_scout_engineeri.html

Girl Scout Juniors are invited to join Colorado School of Mines Society of Women Engineers for a fun day of science explorations! The morning will consist of several science activities ranging from mechanical engineering to chemical engineering. Through completing all the activities at the event, girls will earn a Girl Scout Engineering Day patch and work toward the requirements for Junior level badges (badge information coming soon).

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2018 Westernaires Annual Horse Show

Submitted by Libby Stroup

Metro Denver

Denver

Come see more than 200 horses in a two-hour family friendly show at the National Western Stockshow Complex. Westernaires has been dazzling crowds since 1949 and is the #1 Precision Mounted Drill Team in the world at speed.

Based right here in Golden, Westernaires is a non-profit, 100% volunteer-run organization dedicated to teaching self respect, responsibility, and leadership through horsemanship. The show includes trick riders, dressage, cavalry, roman riders, fire batons, bullwhips, and of course, a precision mounted drill with more than 60 riders in the arena together.

Four shows to choose from:
Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018 at 10 a.m., 2 p.m., and 7 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 28 at 2 p.m.

Tickets at just $10.

If you buy tickets as a Girl Scout, you will get a behind-the-scenes tour to see the stables and meet the riders and horses!

If you are interested, please contact Libby by text or e-mail at (303) 478-2498 or westernairestickets@gmail.com

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.