Tag Archives: Girl Scouts Research Institute

Early Girl Scout experience yields lifetime benefits

Girl Scouts of the USA was founded in the spring of 1912 with one leader and 18 girls. Today it has 3.2 million members; 2.3 million girls and more than 800,000 adult volunteers. Nearly one out of every two American women—there are an estimated 50 million living alumnae—have been Girl Scouts.

Last year, with the upcoming centenary of Girl Scouts of the USA in mind—the organization turned 100 years old on March 12—the Girl Scout Research Institute (GSRI) decided to take a look at the organization’s long-term effects on its girl members. What GSRI found is the basis of a report just now being published, called Girl Scouting Works: The Alumnae Impact Study.

It’s good news: for us here at Girl Scouts of Colorado, for the girls and adults we work with and for the estimated 50 million American women who are former Girl Scouts. In a nutshell, compared with non-alumnae, Girl Scout alumnae feel better about themselves, are more active as mentors and community volunteers, vote more regularly, are better educated and enjoy higher household income. This was particularly true for women who’d been long-term Girl Scouts; those who were members for three or more years scored significantly higher in every area than alumnae who were members for a shorter time.

We see that in our current members while they’re still girls. Those who stay in long enough to earn the Girl Scout Gold Award—generally, seniors in high school—find themselves accomplishing things their ten- or eleven-year-old selves couldn’t even have imagined. (For a girl to earn the Girl Scout Gold Award, by the way, is at least as hard as it is for a boy to attain the rank of Eagle Scout, and parents with children who have done both think it may be harder. The armed forces understand this: Gold Award recipients, just like Eagle Scouts, enter the service one grade higher in rank than other enlistees, having already proven themselves as leaders. If you’re an employer or college admissions officer, ask your female applicants about their Girl Scout experience. If you’re a Gold Award recipient, put it on your resume. This stuff matters.)

“Once a Girl Scout, always a Girl Scout” – that’s me and millions of other alumnae. After reading the GSRI study, I immediately reflected on the inaugural dinner of the Southern Colorado Women’s Chamber in the early 90s. LaRae Orullian, President of the Women’s Bank in Denver and former National President of Girl Scouts of the USA, was the keynote speaker. More than 400 women and a handful of men were present. LaRae asked those who were Girl Scouts to stand up. It would not be exaggerating to say that more than 90 percent of the room was on their feet! As I looked around it was an affirmation of what we know today and a very empowering experience. This was a group of confident women who knew they could do whatever they set out to do and accomplish their dreams. It started out with those words we all learned… “On my honor, I will try” …and look at where we are today!

When asked what they got out of their Girl Scout experience, one thing the alumnae frequently mentioned was confidence: the feeling that they could do whatever they set out to do. This is essential for anyone wanting to lead a successful life, women and men alike, but building and maintaining self-confidence is often more challenging for girls and women.

Girl Scouting is not the only connection to girls’ confidence and later-life success. That’s why in January we launched ToGetHerThere, the largest, boldest advocacy and fundraising cause campaign dedicated to girls’ leadership in our nation’s history. The goal of ToGetHerThere is to level the playing field in leadership opportunities for girls within a single generation. We need all the brainpower we can muster, and we need everyone—parents, corporations, nonprofits, government, and ordinary citizens—to support girls as they figure out what their goals are and stretch themselves to achieve them.

Girl Scouts is a big part of the answer. We’ve always known that, and now we have the numbers to prove it. You don’t have to wait a lifetime to see results, either. If a girl comes to us in the second grade, the odds are good she’s going to have a better and more successful third-grade year. If she stays the course through high school and earns her Gold Award, college—and the rest of her life—are going to be a whole different experience for her. Girl Scouting works.

CEO Corner: Building Girl Scout Confidence

I got a phone call this weekend from a friend whose daughter is in my son’s 6th grade class. She says her daughter worries a lot about if she is liked by the other kids, especially the boys. She wants to wear makeup and clothes that my friend doesn’t think are age appropriate. That got me thinking about how hard it has to be a kid these days, especially a girl. How women and girls are shown in the media, especially on reality TV shows, has such a powerful impact on how we treat each other. In fact, a recent study by the Girl Scout Research Institute found that tween and teen girls who regularly watch reality TV “accept and expect a higher level of drama, aggression and bullying in their own lives, and measure their worth primarily by their physical appearance.”

That’s why Girl Scouts of Colorado is ramping up our focus on giving girls the confidence and tools they need to navigate those tricky situations they move through every day – programs like Power Up, to help them understand and defuse bullying situations, and Fight Like A Girl Scout, to help them recognize and act when they’re threatened. It’s why we’re involved with efforts recently like The Colorado Clothesline Project, addressing issues of violence against girls and women. (View photos and video from this event.) And why we’re planning a Feb. 23rd viewing of the film Miss. Representation , which explores how the media influences perceptions – and misperceptions – of women.

As we ramp up these efforts, we’re looking to our community to support us by volunteering for one of these programs and/or making a donation to help offset the costs of providing them. To learn more about how you can volunteer for or donate, visit Girl Scouts of Colorado’s website.

We’d also like to ask you to show your support by weighing in on a “healthy media” poll put together by the Geena Davis Institute, Girl Scouts of the USA and the Healthy MEdia Commission. This poll will hopefully get lawmakers and the entertainment industry thinking about just how much influence they have on building women leadership in this country.

It’s sad that girls like my friend’s daughter feel so much pressure when they are so young. Girl Scouts is all about helping girls to see that their value isn’t in what they wear, what others think of them or the girl drama. Join me and Girl Scouts of Colorado in helping our girls grow up to be strong, brave, capable leaders.