Tag Archives: Girl Scouts of the USA

World Thinking Day: It’s our time to lead

From Girl Scouts of the USA

If you are planning a World Thinking Day celebration, please fill out the form linked below so the Global Action Committee can compile data and help you make your celebration the best it can be!

Girl Scouts work every day to make the world a better place. It’s just what we do! 

But there’s one day a year that’s extra special, a day when girls from more than 150 countries around the planet come together to explore the global dimensions of Girl Scouting and take action to change the world for the better. 

Of course, we’re talking about World Thinking Day! It’s coming up on February 22, so let’s get ready to make it one of the best ever. 

The theme for World Thinking Day 2019 is leadership—now, that’s an idea we can all support. 

This World Thinking Day, let’s take the opportunity to:

Honor the leadership of Girl Scouts and Girl Guides worldwide, and celebrate what it means to be part of this global sisterhood.  

Advocate for positive change on global issues that girls and their supporters care about. 

Support international opportunities for girls and young women by contributing to the Juliette Low World Friendship Fund

A project of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS), World Thinking Day is the perfect opportunity for girls to think globally and take action. But first, let’s take a moment to understand why and how World Thinking Day came to be. 

The Origins of World Thinking Day

It all dates back to 1926, at the fourth World Conference of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts held at Girl Scouts’ very own Camp Edith Macy (now Edith Macy Conference Center) in New York. The conference delegates agreed that there should be a special day every year when Girl Scouts and Girl Guides around the world think of one another and celebrate global sisterhood. They decided to call it Thinking Day and chose February 22 to celebrate it. (Fun fact: the date was picked to honor the birthdays of Girl Guide founders Lord and Lady Baden-Powell.) 

Then, in 1999, at the 30th World Conference in Dublin, Ireland, delegates from around the world wanted to emphasize the international aspect of the day and the global nature of the Girl Scout Movement, so they changed the name to World Thinking Day. 

Every year since, World Thinking Day has called for Girl Scouts and Girl Guides to unite and take part in activities that promote changing the world for the better.  

How You (and Your Troop) Can Participate

World Thinking Day is for everyone—from the youngest, mightiest Daisy to the Ambassador working toward her Gold Award. And it’s super easy to find your inspiration for how to take action in your community and the world at large. 

Check out these World Thinking Day resources to get started: 

Activity Guide for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors (PDF)  

Activity Guide for Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors (PDF) 

In these convenient, downloadable resources, you’ll find age-appropriate activities for younger girls as well as older girls. The activities fall into three categories: discovering your leadership style, celebrating a sisterhood of leaders, and taking on leadership roles. When girls complete one activity from each category, they’ll earn the World Thinking Day 2019 Award. Although only one activity in each category is required to earn the award, don’t let that stop you—you can do as many as you like!

Now It’s Your Turn to Take the Lead!

Looking for some extra inspiration to make World Thinking Day even more awesome? Check out this amazing story about a group of Brownies who reimagined World Thinking Day to build community. Or this story of a group of Muslim Girl Scouts extending friendship across cultures. That’s what we’re talking about! 

To earn your World Thinking Day 2019 Award, try some of our suggested activities. Then tell us how you’re taking the lead through Girl Scouts and Girl Guides—and how you’re celebrating. You can share your story directly with us or post it on social media with #WorldThinkingDay and #TimeToLead! 

On World Thinking Day 2019, let’s lead together for a better world. World Thinking Day Event Notification: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/2019_global_action_committee_world_thinking_day_event_notification

 

Global leadership opportunity: 2019 Juliette Low Seminar

Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) is seeking 26 participants ages 18–30 to attend the 2019 Juliette Low Seminar, an international leadership development program led by WAGGGS and focused on breaking gender barriers to leadership to drive change. The seminar will take place November 14–20, 2019, simultaneously in 20 “hub” locations around the world, including the in United States.

Applicants must be 18-30 years old and members of the Global Leadership Opportunities (GLO) Pool (or submit their application for the GLO Pool at the same time).

Applications are linked below and due by December 28, 2018. FAQs are also linked for more information.

Questions? Email Anne Canter at GSUSA at globalgirlscouting@girlscouts.org

40963104_gsusa_global-leadership-opportunities__pool_application_form__2018-2020 40962780_juliette_low_seminar_2019_gsusa_participant_application 40963114_jls2019_faqs__7_sep_18

Daisies learn how to keep a digital treasure safe

Submitted by Lorell Duteil

Metro Denver

Lakewood

Lakewood Daisy Troop 60711 recently completely the “Cybersecurity Basics” badge. The girls enjoyed brainstorming ways to protect real and digital “treasure” as well as learning and discussing about different types of computers. The girls protected their crystal gems by boxing, hiding, bubble wrapping, taping, tying it up, warning labels, and disguising the package.

The Daisies were really excited to share all the computers they know of and how they use computers to learn and ‘see’ the world. They are also working on the “Space Explorer” badge and liked talking about computers they could use in space. They are excited to take on the “Cybersecurity Safeguards” badge activities soon.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

G.I.R.L. 2020 National Internship Opportunity for Girl Scouts in Grades 8-10

Every three years, Girl Scouts from across our Movement come together to make the most important decisions about Girl Scouting, and for a weekend of life-changing leadership experiences and fun! Girl Scouts’ 55th National Council Session and G.I.R.L. 2020 will take place in October 2020 in Orlando, Florida. Through inspiring activities and influential speakers, this event will provide thousands of Girl Scouts with the tools to empower themselves and to lead change in their communities.

G.I.R.L. 2020 will be planned by a team of 25 Girl Scouts called the G-TEAM. Members of this team will guide the overall direction of G.I.R.L. 2020 and have the opportunity to participate in field-specific internships in areas such as marketing, event production, governance, logistics, and more. The G-TEAM will spend two years planning for G. I.R.L. 2020, including in-person planning sessions in Orlando, Florida and New York City (all expenses paid by Girl Scouts). At the event in Orlando, the G-TEAM will be both the behind-the-scenes and on-the-stage leaders for this major event.

All Girl Scouts who are currently in grades 8–10 are eligible to apply. The application opens October 19, 2018 and closes November 19 at midnight eastern time.

Spread the word to Girl Scout Cadettes and Seniors for this national internship opportunity!

Apply Now

How to use the Global Action Days Toolkit

Every Girl Scout is part of a special group of girls that stretches not just across the United States, but around the world. Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) is a member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS), which includes 10 million girls in 150 countries. All those girls, in all those countries, are working to make the world a better place.

Throughout the year, girls have the opportunity to work together and participate in Girl Scout programming that relates to different global issues affecting women and girls. This toolkit describes nine international days and is designed to help volunteers engage with Girl Scouts on these global days of action.

The program for each global action day in the toolkit includes:

  •  A description of the day
  • Why Girl Scouts celebrate the day
  • Any program or content notes related to sensitive issues
  • Activities by program grade level (Daisy/Brownie/Junior and Cadette/Senior/Ambassador) and/or activities suitable for all ages
  • Journey and badge connections
  • Suggestions for community service or partnerships
  • Additional resources and references

As girls learn about and explore the issues surrounding a particular day, they may be inspired to engage in community service or even complete a Take Action project. Depending on the program grade
level of the Girl Scouts, these could be used as an option for a Journey Take Action project or lead to a highest award project.
Journey and badge connections are listed for each day of action.

Suggestions for community service are listed in each global action day section, and additional information on different community
service and Take Action projects on page 8. Some activities in this toolkit are applicable to multiple days. It is okay to use the resources
and activities for one day in developing a program for another, similar day.

In addition to this program toolkit, councils will be provided with partnership and social media  resources related to each day on a quarterly basis.

Many of the activities in this toolkit address issues that girls in Girl Scouts face. Be sensitive  to the challenges and experiences of the girls in your troop or group as you explore these topics.

TIPS AND TRICKS

Make sure you have a reasonable understanding of the issue or topic addressed by a global action day before sharing it with girls. We have you covered—you’ll find additional resources and background materials listed in the resources section for each global action day. You don’t have to know everything, but you should have a basic understanding of the topics you’ll be covering and the confidence to look up specific information if girls ask a question to which you don’t know the answer. This shows girls that it’s okay not to be “perfect” and encourages them to learn along with you.

You may also want to ask an expert to share their knowledge and experiences with your troop. Depending on the global action day you are celebrating, this may mean reaching out to a local company or nonprofit organization, university, or government office. For example, on World Environment Day, you might invite an environmental scientist to your meeting to discuss the environment in your community and the way global issues, such as climate change, habitat loss, or natural disasters, have impacted the environment where you live. You may even tap experts within your own personal or professional networks who would love to share their expertise with your troop.

This toolkit includes nine global action days. Don’t try to cover them all, at least not right away. Talk with girls about the days that are most interesting to them, and start with those activities. Some of the days fall quite close together, so you may also want to rotate days through different years. For example, this year you might explore information and communication technology (ICT) topics to participate in Girls in ICT Day, which takes place on the fourth Thursday in April, and next year, you might celebrate Global Action Week for Education, which falls on the third or fourth week in April. Infuse a global perspective in all your activities, not just on these days. Everything we do in Girl Scouts, we do as part of a global sisterhood, 10 million girls strong. When you go hiking or camping, talk with your girls about ways we can all enjoy and protect our planet. When you are volunteering at your local food bank, remember that hunger is a problem everywhere in the world and that by addressing it in your local community, you are helping to solve a global problem. Even when you are just playing, take a moment to remember that all girls enjoy having fun and all girls deserve the opportunity to play. These simple connections remind Girl Scouts that they are part of a community much bigger than themselves.

BUILDING SAFE SPACE

Many of the topics addressed by the days of action in this toolkit can be sensitive and challenging for girls to learn about. At the same time, these issues can deeply motivate girls to take action and create positive change. So it’s critical that girls are able to explore these issues in a safe and supportive environment. Some suggestions for building this safe space within your troop or group meeting are:

  • Let girls and parents know ahead of time what’s on the table for discussion during the meeting. You don’t have to go into the full meeting plan, but it’s a good idea to give them a head’s up so that they can plan and prepare together and you can obtain the necessary permissions, especially if you’ll be addressing sensitive issues. A sample copy of a sensitive issues permission form is found in the appendix of this toolkit.
  • Begin with an icebreaker or trust game, even if group members have known each other for a while. It helps to reinforce a sense of group cohesion.
  • Set a group contract with the girls. This is a good idea to do with any group, regardless of what you’re doing, because it empowers them to discuss and agree on how to treat each other and to establish group norms. Let girls come up with their own rules and discuss them until there is consensus. Some questions you may want to ask girls are:
    • What would make this a safe and respectful place for us to be?
    • What would be good ways to treat each other?
    • What group rules do you have in other places, like at school or in sports? Which ones apply here?
    • How will we make sure we all follow this agreement?
    • Girl Scouts is a girl-led and challenge-by-choice environment.

Make sure girls can opt out if they are uncomfortable or if they need a moment to process. Let them know some good ways to do that, such as going to the bathroom or getting a drink of water. Come up with a signal that girls can use to let you know if they’d like
to talk to you privately about what they’re feeling.

THE ENTIRE GLOBAL ACTION DAYS TOOLKIT CAN BE ACCESSED VIA THE GLOBAL GIRL SCOUT SECTION OF ANYTIME ACTIVITIES: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events/anytime-activities.html

Juniors learn about cybersecurity and earn special patch

Submitted by Natalie Buike

Metro Denver

Aurora

We took a couple of our girls to a park to learn all about cybersecurity. The adults (senders) put together a message on cards that were sent down through the network (long strings of yarn) to each computer (each girl). Once the girls received the message, they had to send it on to the receiver (tree). Once the message made it to the receiver, we had the girls unscramble the message and put it all together. While doing the activity, we explained to the girls how the process works through a real network, just like how a train travels and makes several stops until it stops at its final destination. The parents also explained to the girls how important it is to be as safe as possible with what is sent through email, text, and other social media sites because you never know what information will stop at a computer that can be or has been compromised.

Some of the lessons our girls learned from this activity was that cybersecurity affects just more than a home computer. It is affects phones, tablets, and any other tech devices that can be connected to a network. One of the biggest lessons our girls realized through this is that nothing is really ever safe and that information can always have the potential to be compromised or stolen. The parents really worked on explaining to them that all of the modern day apps like Snapchat and Facebook are not safe and that whatever is posted will always be out there. At the age of 10, I would say that they now have a better understanding on the importance of doing their best to keep their information safe and to always be cautious about what is shared through email, text, social media, apps, etc.

Learn how you (or your troop) can earn this special cybersecurity patch. 

Get your troop outdoors and earn badges for FREE

Girl Scouts of the USA is looking for troops at each Girl Scout level to participate in a research study on the use of outdoor badges, made possible by the Elliott Wildlife Values Project.

What’s Involved

Selected troops will:

  • Be assigned to complete one, two, or three outdoor badges between November 16, 2018 and June 1, 2019. You choose the dates, we choose the number of badges. Troops will be able to choose from a menu of four badges, including camping, environmental stewardship, art in nature, and naturalist badges.
  • Complete and submit to GSUSA a pre- and a post-program survey, or a one-time post-only survey (girls only) after the completion of badge(s). Surveys can be taken on paper or online; survey type will be assigned by GSUSA.
  • Complete an online volunteer survey (leaders only) after the completion of badge(s).

Who Can Participate

  • We are looking for troops at all Girl Scout levels (multi-level welcome).
  • Troops with any level of outdoor experience welcome. No outdoor experience required.
  • Troops that participated in the 2018 outdoor survey pilot study are not eligible.

Benefit to Troops

Participating troops will have the opportunity to help Girl Scouts of the USA understand how our programs benefit girls. Participating troops will also receive all earned badges free of charge!

How to Apply

Interested troops can apply here. A troop leader must complete the entire application by October 31 to be considered.

Brownies earn cybersecurity patch

Submitted by Sheri Wanamaker

Metro Denver

Denver

Girl Scouts from newly formed Brownie Troop 67615, from Denver’s High Tech Elementary School, were introduced to the concept of cybersecurity earlier this month. The girls drew castles and designed security systems. The girls were very creative and included modern biometric security features, such as facial recognition and fingerprint scanning. The girls combined medieval security concepts such as, moats with alligators, dragons, knights, and tall walls with digital security that included usernames, passwords, motion sensors, and video cameras. The girls discussed ways that security affects their daily life when using computers, tablets, smartphones, and keyless entry. The girls are looking forward to more STEM related activities!

Learn how you (or your troop) can earn this special cybersecurity patch. 

Introducing the Global Action Toolkit

Every Girl Scout is part of a special group of girls that stretches not just across the United States, but around the world. Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) is a member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS), which includes 10 million girls in 150 countries. All those girls, in all those countries, are working to make the world a better place.

Throughout the year, girls have the opportunity to work together and participate in Girl Scout programming that relates
to different global issues affecting women and girls. This toolkit describes nine international days and is designed to help volunteers engage with Girl Scouts on these global days of action.

What Is Global Girl Scouting?

Global means relating to the whole world. A global organization is worldwide and international, and from our very beginning, the Girl Guide and Girl Scout Movement has been international in nature.

In 1909, Sir Robert Baden-Powell, founder of the Boy Scouts in the United Kingdom, held the first Boy Scout rally at a park in London called the Crystal Palace. As they gathered, a group of girls marched onto the Crystal Palace and demanded to be able to participate. Seeing the passion and commitment of these girls, Baden-Powell turned to his sister Agnes Baden-Powell to begin the Girl Guide/Girl Scout Movement. Soon after, groups started in the United
Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, New Zealand, and South Africa.

A few years later, in 1912, Juliette Gordon Low met Baden-Powell and discovered her life’s purpose in Girl Scouting. She founded three troops of Girl Guides in London and Scotland before returning to the United States to found Girl Scouts of the USA, and start the first Girl Scout troop in Savannah, Georgia, on March 12, 1912.

From that first meeting of 18 girls, Girl Scouts pushed boundaries—welcoming girls across class, cultural, and ethnic lines to ensure all girls, including those with disabilities, had a place to grow and develop their leadership skills. They played basketball. They hiked, swam, and camped. They learned to read the world around them for instance, earning badges by studying a foreign language or learning to tell time by the stars.

Girl Scouting continued to expand its reach to more and more girls, with the first Girl Scout troops launching outside the United States in China, Syria, and Mexico. Lone Troops on Foreign Soil (now called USA Girl Scouts Overseas) registered its first Girl Scout troop in Shanghai, China, with 18 girls in 1925.6 Today, Girl Scouts of the USA includes 2 million Girl Scouts in 92 countries around the world.
Juliette Gordon Low said it best when she declared, “Girl Scouting and Girl Guiding can be the magic thread which
links the youth of the world together.” For over 100 years, the Girl Scout and Girl Guide Movement has brought girls
together in a global sisterhood to make the world a better place.
There are many ways for girls to engage with this global sisterhood throughout their Girl Scout experience. Whether it
is exploring global issues through a Girl Scout Journey, earning their Global Action award, or traveling with a Girl Scout
Destination, girls can engage with global issues at every program grade level.

This toolkit—for learning about or taking part in nine global action days—is a resource for councils and volunteers to help girls connect to our global Movement and to the issues that affect girls around the world.

Stay tuned for more blog posts about the Global Action Toolkit! Information such as how to use the toolkit and how to celebration each Global Action Day is coming next.

You can access the entire Global Action Days Toolkit under the Global Girl Scout section of Anytime Activities: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events/anytime-activities.html

Questions? Email gscoglobal@gmail.com

New Space Science badges

From Sylvia Acevedo, CEO, Girl Scouts of the USA

I’m so excited about Girl Scouts of the USA’s new Space Science badges for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors, funded by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate through a multi-party collaboration led by the SETI Institute. GSUSA developed each badge with support from the SETI Institute’s subject matter expert partners from the University of Arizona, ARIES Scientific, and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and with the participation of Girl Scouts of Northern California.

Daisies’ Space Science Explorer
Brownies’ Space Science Adventurer
Juniors’ Space Science Investigator badge

Daisies who earn their Space Science Explorer badge examine the sun and moon and look at the night sky. Brownies who pursue their Space Science Adventurer badge dig into the solar system, the phases of the moon, and the constellations, and then share their findings. And Juniors who tackle their Space Science Investigator badge research a planet and develop models that explain celestial motion, the three-dimensional nature of a constellation, and the size and scale of the solar system.

I get so excited thinking about how many girls across the country are right now discovering a passion for space and astronomy just as I did as a young Girl Scout, thanks to Girl Scouts and our incredible partners at NASA!

So on behalf of the entire Girl Scout Movement, I want to congratulate NASA on 60 years of discovery, innovation, and incredible, visionary work. And here’s to the next 60!