Tag Archives: Girl Scout Cadettes

When things go wrong, but it’s actually a good thing…

Submitted by Kate Goodman

Metro Denver

Centennial

Sometimes, when I’m in the throes of planning meetings and activities, I wonder, “What are we really doing? Is all my work as a troop leader or volunteer worth it?”

This past weekend, I got an answer. I want to share a story about a recent service unit campout, and my A-ha! moment with my troop of 8th grade Cadettes.

It was a hectic week to begin with – a few weeks into the school year. Another leader was planning to take our four Girl Scouts up to Tomahawk Ranch for the service unit campout on Friday night, because I was coming home from a work trip late Friday. I would come up Saturday morning with the materials our troop was using to do a craft with the younger girls: a quick flashlight using copper tape, craft sticks, and those little lightbulbs- LEDs.

On Tuesday, my co-leader reported her car was out of commission, so we scrambled and found another parent who could shuttle the five of them to Tomahawk Ranch on Friday. With that settled on late Tuesday, I got up early on Wednesday and assembled the health and permission forms. I worked, then hurried home and caught my flight to a conference. I arrived home late Friday to learn everyone had gotten off safely to the campout. Relieved, I fell into bed, planning to quickly pack first thing in the morning.

I woke and began assembling my sleeping bag and day pack. A quick search of the craft materials sent my heart into adrenaline-fueled thumping – I couldn’t find two of the essential items – the copper tape and the bag of LEDs. I’d had to special order these – I wasn’t going to breeze through the craft store and get more on my way out of town. After a staticky call to my service unit leader up at camp to verify my daughter hadn’t packed these things, I resigned myself to needing to brainstorm a NEW hour-long activity for the younger girls, and began my hour-plus long drive to reach Tomahawk. In the meantime, my co-leader shared the trouble with the Cadettes, and the girls began brainstorming.

An hour later, I arrived at camp, found the location of our station, and started talking to my co-leader and girls and a bonus Cadette from another troop.

They didn’t need my ideas. They had come up with a name-learning game, appropriate song, and activity around fire pit safety and how to start a fire, complete with hands-on gathering of ‘dead and down’ tinder, kindling, and fuel. The younger Girl Scouts had a great time at our station. They asked good questions. They joined in on the song. And they set up mock camp fires, using the “log cabin” structure – wait no, my troop taught them it was the “hashtag.” (Aaaand now I feel old.)

Five rotations later (with a lunch break in the middle) my troop had educated more than 100 other girls on these concepts. Mostly, I had stood back and watched. I occasionally pointed out the time to help them stay on schedule. I didn’t need to design the craft for them. I didn’t need to tell them how to simplify certain concepts or to make it fun. I didn’t have to tell them to split up the leading time and make sure they included our bonus Cadette. They just did it.

That was my answer. I needed to say less, suggest less, and listen more. It took a panicked-filled hour-long drive from home to camp to come to terms with it, but there it was. Girl Scouting was working exactly as designed, and my troop was living proof.

That evening, when my daughter set up and lit the campfire for the entire service unit, nearly single-handedly*, the younger girls called out encouragement and concern (she had to sit inside the extra-large stone ring to set up and start the fire). Here, I realized, was the whole Girl Scouting mission in one day: older Girl Scouts drawing upon their knowledge and skills to teach the younger girls, and then showing them that they, not the adults had the ability to do things for themselves. It didn’t hurt that it all ended with roasting marshmallows for s’mores!

* This is a whole other story!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

99’s Aviation Patch Day

Submitted by Theresa Monroe

Metro Denver

Denver

Juliette Gordon Low experienced her first flight eight years after the Wright brothers successfully flew the Wright Flyer I in 1903. The thrilling experience lead Juliette to introduce a “Girl Scouts Aviation” badge to the Girl Scouts Handbook.

Keeping with that tradition, on October 13, 2018, the Colorado 99s, an organization of all female pilots, is hosting Aviation Patch Day. This program is for Girl Scout Juniors and Cadettes who are interested in aviation-related activities. These include making and racing various paper airplanes, learning the language of aviation, understanding more about weather, hearing the history of aviation, and even sitting in the cockpit of an airplane.

Event details:

Saturday, October 13, 2018

1 – 4 p.m.

Rocky Mountain Metro’s Airport Terminal

11755 Airport Way

Broomfield, CO 80021

Cost of the event is $6 per Girl Scout
Register through the GSCO website: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events/events-calendar.html
*** Last day to register is October 6.

Questions? Contact Theresa Monroe at (719) 210 – 0890 or monroetheresa@ymail.com.

Some female pilots begin flying from birth when their parents take them flying where as others start later in life. I personally began flying my junior year of high school. That year I took my first flight and I fell in love with it! Every day since I’ve spent my time walking with my eyes turned to the sky. Now, I am a commercial pilot and I travel the world and enjoy my flying. You can be a pilot too, if you can dream it, you can achieve it. It’s never too late to start!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Cave of the Winds Sleepover 2018

Submitted by Sheila Durnil

Northern & Northeastern CO

Berthoud

Three Cadettes from Troop 74087 took part in one of the four sleepover nights at Cave of the Winds in Manitou Springs on August 24, 2018. The Cadettes conquered the Windwalker Challenge. Two of the girls fearlessly climbed and conquered every level and the other girl conquered her fear of heights and made it through the first level! Her chaperones also conquered their fear of heights and joined her in celebration.

Other fun activities included the Bat-a-Pult, laser show, Stalactite Slide, and Bat Room/Maze. Beautiful rocks and fun crystals were found during the sluicing time. The cave tour was dark, damp, and dusty. The cave’s atmosphere can throw a curveball at you, such as aggravating allergies (dust, mold, mildew), claustrophobia (damp, dark, tight places), and lack of proper wardrobe preparation can lead to wardrobe malfunctions (wear a belt or expect a full moon!) The Cadettes learned about the history and saw the giant’s nostril, the butter churn natural formations in the cave and the dangerous possibilities of the cave’s crystal formations. Expect to get muddy!

Following the movie, Wall-E, the Cadettes and chaperones slept in their sleeping bags in the cave (we recommend finding your spot early and air mattresses or lawn chaises!!!) and woke up to quickly pack up to head home.

The Cadettes can’t wait to share their experience with the other Cadettes and their friends to encourage them to check out the caves. The conquerors decided they are going to continue to work on their fear of heights and encourage others to face their fears, too.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Juliette’s Journey through Wonderland

Submitted by Jen Rotar

Northern & Northeastern CO

Berthoud

Cadette Troop 70700 in Berthoud is hosting a magical Journey in a Day for Brownies. Join us on Saturday, November 3, 2018 from noon to 4 p.m. to complete the  “World of Girls” Journey.

This Journey is based on Juliette’s travels through Wonderland. Make new friends, write your adventure story, design a Mad Hatter hat, enter a caterpillar race, chase the white rabbit, and celebrate your unbirthday! This is a high-energy event with lots of fun activities Brownies will love. Its all about making positive choices!

“This is an enthusiastic day that allows the imagination to run wild! The older girls that lead this Journey spark creativity and team-building throughout the activities. This is a very well-organized day of fun where the girls learn and grow together. Highly recommended!” ~ Michelle, Leader of Brownie Troop 75895

Cost $10 per girl and includes a tea party snack and your Take Action project. You can find more details and RSVP on the GSCO event calendar: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2018/juliette_s_journey_t.html

Troop 70700 is a diverse group of Cadettes who love all the adventures Girl Scouts has to offer. This year’s troop focus is leadership experience, using their PA skills, and working on their Silver Award. Our troop is high energy and outdoorsy, and has enjoyed summer adventures including camping, whitewater rafting, and horseback riding.

This money-earning activity will help send Troop 70700 on their first big trip next summer.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Sister troops go backpacking

Submitted by Elizabeth Moore

Metro Denver

Conifer

The Cadettes of sister troops 2064 and 8242 went backpacking in the Mt. Evans Wilderness Area the weekend before Memorial Day. Seven girls and two leaders went on this challenging six-mile loop.

The girls were greeted with a massive thunderstorm five-minutes from the campsite, leaving them to take shelter in the forest until the lightning subsided. Once at the campsite, the girls took turns holding a large tarp over each others’ tents until they could be fully pitched with the rainfly on, preventing the inside from becoming soaked. Then, they worked together to gather and dry wood for a campfire. These Cadettes showed amazing teamwork in a tough situation.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Power of cookie: Troop 64098 supports Special Olympics of Colorado

Submitted by Shannon Michel

Metro Denver

Centennial

Cadette Troop 64098 from Aurora/Centennial volunteered at the Special Olympics of Colorado’s Summer Classic in Colorado Springs. They brought 200 packages of Girl Scout Cookies donated through the Hometown Heroes program. These young ladies assisted at opening and closing ceremonies and events of tennis, bocce ball, and cycling.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Silver Award Girl Scouts work to ban disposable plastic bags

Girl Scout Cadettes Ella M., Amanda B., Mia J., and Giana A. of Troop 62458 from the Columbine area in Littleton waited for more than FIVE HOURS on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 to talk once again with Jefferson County Commissioners about why they should ban the use of disposable plastic bags. The girls are working to earn the Girl Scout Silver Award, the highest honor for a Girl Scout Cadette and the second highest honor in Girl Scouting. Even though Commissioners told the Girl Scouts they will not implement the ban, these Girl Scouts aren’t giving up. They now plan to talk with business owners and the public to encourage everyone to stop using disposable plastic bags.

The Cadettes first brought their idea to Commissioners on July 31 and made the following statement:

In Colorado, we see plastic bags littering our rivers and highways, and in trees all over our parks. The plastic bags degrade into our rivers, lakes, and reservoirs polluting our water, therefore damaging our ecosystem.

In addition, disposable plastic bags make our groceries more expensive. Stores pay anywhere from $1 to $6,000 per month on disposable bags. The stores then add that cost into groceries and products. The average hidden cost of bags that consumers pay is $37.50 every year. Consumers use 100 billion plastic bags per year. More than 90% end up in landfills where they are not exposed to elements that would degrade them. We cannot let this go on any longer. Plastic bags continually block drainage systems and put poisons into the water supply. Many animals mistakenly eat plastic bags and as more animals eat each other, the pollutants go up the food chain, and eventually end up on our dinner tables. It’s time we take control of the environmental impact of our actions by getting rid of disposable plastic grocery bags.

Commissioners wanted to recognize the girls’ hard work and dedication, so they presented them with a special coin on behalf of Jefferson County.

The girls talked with Dan Daru of Fox31/KDVR-TV after the second meeting with Commissioners: https://bit.ly/2Pa3Jtv

On Tuesday, July 31, the girls were interviewed by Ashley Michels of Fox31/KDVR-TV: https://bit.ly/2OAvfAo

Silver Award project: Capes with “healing powers”

Submitted by Jennifer Redmond

Metro Denver

Aurora

We are creating “capes with healing powers” for our Silver Award project! We are designing a sewing class in conjunction with JOANN Fabrics where Girl Scouts and community members alike can learn to sew and create capes for sick kids in the hospital. We will hand deliver all of the capes along with care packages of crafty and fun things to do in the hospital.

Make a child’s day! Help them feel strong and have fun. Anyone can help. We created packets with sewing instructions and a pattern to hand out to people in the community who can sew. We will collect all of the capes and deliver them to the hospital. We have a goal of collecting 100 capes by January 1, 2019!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Silver Award project: Plastic bag ban

Submitted by Girl Scout Cadette Troop 62458

Metro Denver

Littleton

We are Girl Scout Cadettes Ella M., Amanda B., Mia J.,  and Giana A. from the Columbine area in Littleton. As part of our project to earn our Silver Award, today (July 31, 2018), we proposed a ban on the use of disposable plastic bags in Jefferson County before the Jeffco Board of County Commissioners. In Colorado, we see plastic bags littering our rivers and highways, and in trees all over our parks. The plastic bags degrade into our rivers, lakes, and reservoirs polluting our water, therefore damaging our ecosystem.

In addition, disposable plastic bags make our groceries more expensive. Stores pay anywhere from $1 to $6,000 per month on disposable bags. The stores then add that cost into groceries and products. The average hidden cost of bags that consumers pay is $37.50 every year. Consumers use 100 billion plastic bags per year. More than 90% end up in landfills where they are not exposed to elements that would degrade them. We cannot let this go on any longer. Plastic bags continually block drainage systems and put poisons into the water supply. Many animals mistakenly eat plastic bags and as more animals eat each other, the pollutants go up the food chain, and eventually end up on our dinner tables. It’s time we take control of the environmental impact of our actions by getting rid of disposable plastic grocery bags.

On Tuesday, July 31, 2018, the girls were interviewed by Ashley Michels of Fox31/KDVR-TV. Use this link to watch the story. https://bit.ly/2OAvfAo

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too

 

Big city fun for mountain town Cadettes

Submitted by Annie Sachs

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Steamboat Springs Cadette Troop 54538 recently celebrated earning their Bronze Award (as fifth-graders) with a Denver weekend of theater and fine dining! The girls loved the touring Broadway musical “School of Rock,” especially with all the children in the cast. They also enjoyed a behind-the-scenes tour of DCPA and capped off the weekend with the famed Brown Palace brunch. Thanks so much to the Lufkin Family for helping fund all the fun!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.