Tag Archives: Girl Scout Cadette

Sister troops go backpacking

Submitted by Elizabeth Moore

Metro Denver

Conifer

The Cadettes of sister troops 2064 and 8242 went backpacking in the Mt. Evans Wilderness Area the weekend before Memorial Day. Seven girls and two leaders went on this challenging six-mile loop.

The girls were greeted with a massive thunderstorm five-minutes from the campsite, leaving them to take shelter in the forest until the lightning subsided. Once at the campsite, the girls took turns holding a large tarp over each others’ tents until they could be fully pitched with the rainfly on, preventing the inside from becoming soaked. Then, they worked together to gather and dry wood for a campfire. These Cadettes showed amazing teamwork in a tough situation.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Power of cookie: Troop 64098 supports Special Olympics of Colorado

Submitted by Shannon Michel

Metro Denver

Centennial

Cadette Troop 64098 from Aurora/Centennial volunteered at the Special Olympics of Colorado’s Summer Classic in Colorado Springs. They brought 200 packages of Girl Scout Cookies donated through the Hometown Heroes program. These young ladies assisted at opening and closing ceremonies and events of tennis, bocce ball, and cycling.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Silver Award Girl Scouts work to ban disposable plastic bags

Girl Scout Cadettes Ella M., Amanda B., Mia J., and Giana A. of Troop 62458 from the Columbine area in Littleton waited for more than FIVE HOURS on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 to talk once again with Jefferson County Commissioners about why they should ban the use of disposable plastic bags. The girls are working to earn the Girl Scout Silver Award, the highest honor for a Girl Scout Cadette and the second highest honor in Girl Scouting. Even though Commissioners told the Girl Scouts they will not implement the ban, these Girl Scouts aren’t giving up. They now plan to talk with business owners and the public to encourage everyone to stop using disposable plastic bags.

The Cadettes first brought their idea to Commissioners on July 31 and made the following statement:

In Colorado, we see plastic bags littering our rivers and highways, and in trees all over our parks. The plastic bags degrade into our rivers, lakes, and reservoirs polluting our water, therefore damaging our ecosystem.

In addition, disposable plastic bags make our groceries more expensive. Stores pay anywhere from $1 to $6,000 per month on disposable bags. The stores then add that cost into groceries and products. The average hidden cost of bags that consumers pay is $37.50 every year. Consumers use 100 billion plastic bags per year. More than 90% end up in landfills where they are not exposed to elements that would degrade them. We cannot let this go on any longer. Plastic bags continually block drainage systems and put poisons into the water supply. Many animals mistakenly eat plastic bags and as more animals eat each other, the pollutants go up the food chain, and eventually end up on our dinner tables. It’s time we take control of the environmental impact of our actions by getting rid of disposable plastic grocery bags.

Commissioners wanted to recognize the girls’ hard work and dedication, so they presented them with a special coin on behalf of Jefferson County.

The girls talked with Dan Daru of Fox31/KDVR-TV after the second meeting with Commissioners: https://bit.ly/2Pa3Jtv

On Tuesday, July 31, the girls were interviewed by Ashley Michels of Fox31/KDVR-TV: https://bit.ly/2OAvfAo

Big city fun for mountain town Cadettes

Submitted by Annie Sachs

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Steamboat Springs Cadette Troop 54538 recently celebrated earning their Bronze Award (as fifth-graders) with a Denver weekend of theater and fine dining! The girls loved the touring Broadway musical “School of Rock,” especially with all the children in the cast. They also enjoyed a behind-the-scenes tour of DCPA and capped off the weekend with the famed Brown Palace brunch. Thanks so much to the Lufkin Family for helping fund all the fun!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Bronze and Silver Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Pueblo

Nearly one hundred Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Center for American Values in Pueblo on April 21, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2016-17 Girl Scout awards program year, more than 1,000 girls across the state and 24 in Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. Over the last two years, 18 girls across Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.