Tag Archives: Girl Scout badges

Senior Sky Badge: Step Four of Five

The sky is a masterpiece. Every day it graces us with living art, whether through a glorious sunset, shifting cloud formations, or the stunning display of night stars. No wonder we take every opportunity to spend time outdoors. Girl Scout Seniors can earn their Sky badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program.

Air quality is an important factor to our health and the health of the earth’s plants, animals, and overall environment. When you’ve completed this part of earning the Senior Sky badge, you will be an active participant in helping to improve the earths air quality.

In the United States, cities like New York City and Los Angeles’ poor air quality is known to be a health threat to the people who live there. This is primarily due to the high levels of vehicle traffic, which burns fossil fuels resulting in a high quantity of emissions that contribute directly to air pollution.

Since the COVID-10 pandemic has tragically but temporarily halted people driving en masse in these cities, something WONDERFUL has happened. The air in those cities (and around the world) is A LOT cleaner. Los Angeles’ air is 20-30% cleaner, and LA citizens enjoyed the most “good” air quality days the city has seen since 1995. According to NASA, as of April 9 2020, New York and the northeastern region has also seen a reduction of 30% in air pollution.

These improvements are the direct result of the reduction in vehicle emissions. Fewer cars on the road means less air pollution. But ,it isn’t only vehicle emissions that cause poor air quality. Electricity generation also significantly add to air pollution.

So, what can YOU do to help this trend of improved air quality continue when things get moving once again? There are many small steps each of us can take that add up to have a larger impact in the improvement of air quality.

Step One: Drive or ride in single vehicles less to reduce emissions.

As you learned above, vehicle emissions cause air pollution. Choose at least three of the options suggested below to help reduce the toxic emissions generated by vehicles.

Drive smarter and drive less.

  • Organize a carpool for going to and from acitivities. Reach out to your friends and family to arrange for some of you to carpool at least three days/week. You may also want to offer a ride to friends who are all going to the same place. One adult can drop off and another can take everyone home. Explore Park and Ride options for your other family members and encourage them to carpool also.
  • Walk or bike for short trips! Pledge to walk or bike for trips that are a distance of one-mile or less whenever it is safe to do so. Encourage your family and friends to join you.
  • Be a good neighbor: when you do make a quick run for bread or milk or even when doing your regular shopping, ask your neighbors if you can pick anything up for them. This will reduce the amount of people making trips and help reduce emissions.
  • Use public transportation when possible. Taking the bus, shuttle, or other public transport greatly reduces pollutants. In many major cities, there are thousands of people who choose not to own cars because the public transportation options are so convenient and efficient. Explore what safe public transportation might be available to you and discuss this option with a parent or guardian.
  • Get in and GO! Encourage the adults in your house to only let a vehicle warm up for two or three mins before driving. Vehicles that sit idling for extended periods contribute to air pollution.
  • Drive or ride in an electric or hybrid vehicle. You may not be old enough to drive yet, but when you are you can choose an electric, hybrid, and/or a fuel-efficient vehicle. You can certainly suggest and encourage the adults in your life to choose these types of vehicles when it’s time for a replacement. If an electric or hybrid is out of the question, at least encourage the drivers in your home to maintain their vehicles. Properly maintained vehicles generate less CO2 which will reduce pollution and greenhouse gases.

Step Two: Shop smart! Put your shopping dollars to work to help the planet and your community.

Every online order requires air and/or ground transportation.Getting the items you order from the online retailer to your door means that the item must travel in at least one, but likely multiple vehicles. We all love the convenience and selection of online shopping. However, this does contribute to air pollution. Consider making at least two of these swaps instead.

  • Shop local. Oftentimes our local boutiques and shops have wonderful selections that are of high quality. When shopping for clothes, gifts, and accessories, consider shopping from an individual retailer over shopping online. This benefits the planet AND your community by providing a source of income to the local store owner and employees. If you don’t find what you’re looking for right away, ASK, these shop owners often have a list of suppliers who may have just the right item for you.
  • Eat local. Choose produce, meat, and dairy products that are sourced as close to home, but at least within a few hundred miles of your home will have the greatest impact! The less distance goods (foods, toiletries, etc.) travel, the result is less air pollution and greenhouse gases that contribute to sky pollution. Farmer’s markets in the summer, and food co-ops that provide farm to fork selections are great options. If these aren’t possible for you, at least read labels when at the supermarket and choose the item that was grown or manufactured closest to you.
  • Eat vegetarian at least one night/week. Meatless Mondays are a healthy and delicious way to reduce greenhouse gases while exploring new recipes.

Step Three: Conserve electricity.

Electricity is often generated by power plants that burn fossil fuels (coal, oil, and natural gas).  These type of power plants contribute to sky pollution. Make some of these adjustments to your daily routine to help conserve energy and reduce emissions from power plants.

  • Turn off devices and appliances that you are not using. If you are not in the room, turn off TV’s, lights, and computers you aren’t using.
  • Unplug power cords when you’re gone during the day. One idea is to keep a power strip with multiple items plugged in, then simply unplug the power strip when these items are not in use.
  • Take shorter showers. Warm showers use electricity or gas to heat water in the hot water heater. Shorter showers will use less energy, and you’ll also help the planet by saving water. Try keeping your shower to five minutes or less most days. That’s about as long as it takes for two songs to play.
  • Explore and choose solar. Choose retailers and suppliers of goods that have solar and other green systems in place. There are many solar products on the market, including solar lamps and solar power sources, for charging cell phones or powering other small household appliances.

Bonus

Research and compile information about schools, businesses, and homes buying into solar power and solar rebates from local utility companies. Create a presentation, then ask to meet with facility managers at your school, job, or afterschool club to see if solar might be right for them as their primary source of power.

Badge Bonus: Plant trees.

Get a school club or neighborhood group together to perform this wonderful community service project. Volunteer with your local parks department or arbor day chapter and spend a day planting trees. Trees not only beautify our surroundings; they reduce greenhouse gases by converting carbon dioxide into oxygen during the process of photosynthesis.

Consider checking out these sites for scientific information about air pollution

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Senior Behind the Ballot Badge Step Three of Five

In a few years, you will be 18-years-old and able to vote. It is also a presidential election year, and a year in which Colorado chooses a new U.S. Senator, and all the seats we hold in the House of Representatives are on the ballot as well. In American history, women and 18-year-olds have not always had the right to vote (or run as a candidate for office), but now they do, and you will. It will not only be your right to vote, but a wonderful way to honor the women who fought for our right to vote in every election. Voting is also the best (and easiest) way to tell the government where you stand on the issues and whom you think is best able to make decisions that will affect you and your sister Girl Scouts. In the Senior Behind the Ballot Badge, we will explore the way people get elected to office, and the importance of voting both here at home and around the world.

Step One: Find out more about elections

Step Two: Investigate the Ins and Outs of Voting

Step Three: Get Out the Vote

The 26th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution lowered the legal voting age from 21 to 18. Yet, in the 2016 election, less that 50% of voters under 30 cast a ballot. While this is the only age group to have election turnout increase since the 2012 election, it is still the age group with the lowest turn-out by far. Choose one or more activities to help increase the voter turnout of young Americans.

Research and create a poster. Explain the voter registration process you learned in Step Two, including the motor voter registration, which makes it easier for any American with a state issued driver’s license or identification card to register to vote. Include the other ways there are to vote, including a link to online voter registration.

OR

Make a Voting Calendar. It can be paper, electronic, in app form, or to be integrated into social media. Please include local, state, and federal elections for your county. You might also include nonpartisan websites and references where any voter can get truthful and unbiased information about candidates and issues.

OR

Educate! Get a sample ballot from a recent election, and use it as a tool to show young voters in Colorado how easy it is to fill out and return a ballot, who won in the last election, and how their vote is important. Include data on the winners, and how many people voted for each candidate or issue.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Senior Behind the Ballot Badge Step Two of Five

In a few years, you will be 18-years-old and able to vote. It is also a presidential election year, and a year in which Colorado chooses a new U.S. Senator, and all the seats we hold in the House of Representatives are on the ballot as well. In American history, women and 18-year-olds have not always had the right to vote (or run as a candidate for office), but now they do, and you will. It will not only be your right to vote, but a wonderful way to honor the women who fought for our right to vote in every election. Voting is also the best (and easiest) way to tell the government where you stand on the issues and whom you think is best able to make decisions that will affect you and your sister Girl Scouts. In the Senior Behind the Ballot Badge, we will explore the way people get elected to office, and the importance of voting both here at home and around the world.

Step One: Find out more about elections

Step Two: Investigate the Ins and Outs of Voting

Learn the very easy, but important steps that are required to vote in Colorado by completing one or more of the activities below.

Research voter access. Research the history of Colorado’s law that mails every registered voter a ballot. How do you register to vote? Has this led to more voter turn-? Where can voters drop off ballots if they don’t want to pay for a stamp. How is voter fraud avoided? How can voters correct a mistake they made or replace a damaged ballot? Design a pamphlet or video with instructions on how to vote at home, and how to turn in your ballot, along with FAQs for how to fix common problems.

OR

Research voting technologies. Each county elects a Clerk and Recorder, whose job it is to run elections, and select the method by which the voters cast their ballots. Look at three different counties or states to see how voting technology choices differ from region to region. Are there still those that use the manual punch cards, or machines with manual buttons and a handle to pull once the full ballot has been voted? What role do computers play in helping voters cast their ballots, and helping the Clerk and Recorder’s Office count the ballots? What common accommodations are made for those who need assistance, such as people who are blind, can’t read, don’t speak English? How is fraud avoided? What are the challenges that people face with the technology that currently exists? What are the pros and cons to internet or smart phone voting? Share your findings with your troop, on the GSCO Blog, or on FacebookTwitter, or Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

OR

Research Voter Registration. Research the requirements for being an eligible voter in Colorado? How old to you have to be? What does it mean to be a resident? What sorts of things cause you to lose your eligibility? What are the ways you can register to vote? Is the motor-voter registration access enough? Why or why not? What are the barriers to registration? What are the pros and cons to automatic registration once a person turns 18? Do you support automatic voter registration? Come up with a PSA to support your position and share it on the GSCO Blog, or on FacebookTwitter, or Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouts at Home: Senior Collage Artist Badge Part Three of Five

Earn the Senior Collage Artist badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program team! This badge is an opportunity make art as unique as you are, so get ready to see the creative possibility in everyday objects.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts at Home: Senior Collage Artist Badge Part Two of Five

Earn the Senior Collage Artist badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program team! This badge is an opportunity make art as unique as you are, so get ready to see the creative possibility in everyday objects.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Brownie Pets badge Part Two of Five

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has created a series of materials, including videos, to help Girl Scout Brownies earn their Pets badge at home! Step One was to find out what care different pets need. For Step Two, you’re going learn about keeping pets comfortable, so we’re going to make a cozy cat cave.

Materials

  • Deep Cardboard Box (with no lid)- You can use different-sized boxes to make a cat cave that works best for the age and breed of your cat. Use the box that will work best for your cat’s needs!
  • Long sleeve T-shirt
  • One rubber band
  • Comfy bedding material (blanket, towel, or even a sweater)

Directions

  1. Begin by stretching your long-sleeved T-shirt around the box, with the neck-hole of the T-shirt facing the open top of the box.
  2. Next, pull the shirt around the box in such a way that the neckhole of the T-shirt is centered on the top of the box. The neck hole will be the “door” that enables the cat to enter the cave.
  3. Once you have the “door” of the cave centered on the box, pull the sleeves of the T-shirt tight around the back of the box and secure them together. If the sleeves are long enough, you can tie the sleeves together. Otherwise, just use a rubber-band to connect the two sleeves.
  4. Finally, place the bedding material inside the box to complete your comfy cat cave. If you have any of your cat’s favorite toys or catnip, you can also put that inside the cave to make it extra welcoming for your furry friend.

We also created a video to help you complete this step of the badge, check it out here.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts introduces 30 new badges to power girl leadership

From Girl Scouts of the USA

Girl Scouts releases new badges in environmental stewardship, space science, robotics, and more to help girls create positive change in their communities—and beyond.

Today, Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) rolled out 30 new badges and 2 new Journeys (available now!) exclusively for girls ages 5–18—enhancing the time tested, one-of-a-kind leadership experience that has prepared countless women and girls to excel in life. The new programming will prepare girls to address some of society’s most pressing needs through hands-on learning in cybersecurity, environmental advocacy, mechanical engineering, robotics, computer science, and space exploration. 

The new programming for girls in grades 6–12 includes:

  • Think Like a Programmer Journey, funded by Raytheon and providing a strong foundation in computational thinking and the framework for Girl Scouts’ first ever national Cyber Challenge, coming in 2019. The programming will prepare girls to pursue careers in fields such as cybersecurity, computer science, and robotics. Learn more.
  • Environmental Stewardship badges, funded by the Elliott Wildlife Values Project and expanding on GSUSA’s current Environmental Stewardship badge offerings. Girls in grades K–12 are encouraged to prepare for outdoor experiences and take action on environmental issues they care about. Although Girl Scouts have been advocating for the environment since the organization’s founding 106 years ago, the new badges are the first to specifically mobilize girls to be environmental advocates who address problems, find solutions, and take the lead to protect the natural world. Learn more.
  • Robotics badges that teach girls how to program, design, and showcase robots, completing the suite of Robotics badges that GSUSA introduced for girls in grades K–5 last year. Now, every Girl Scout can develop robotics skills and earn badges while she’s at it! Learn more.
  • The College Knowledge badge for Girl Scouts in grades 11 and 12—the first badge dedicated to college exploration. By showing girls how to research the admissions process, financial aid, and other key factors, our College Knowledge badge meets a specific need and addresses the life skills girls have told us they’re interested in—and that many don’t find support for outside Girl Scouts. Learn more.
  • Think Like an Engineer Journey, which helps girls understand how engineers address and solve problems. As with all Girl Scout Leadership Journeys, girls complete hands-on activities and use their newly honed skills to take action on a problem in their community. Learn more.

Girls in grades K–5 can now earn badges in:

  • Cybersecurity. Funded by Palo Alto Networks, our new Cybersecurity badges introduce girls to age-appropriate online safety and privacy principles, how the internet works, and spotting and investigating cybercrime. Learn more.
  • Space Science. Funded by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate and led by the SETI Institute, these badges let girls channel their inner NASA scientist as they learn about objects in space and how astronomers conduct investigations. Learn more.
  • Mechanical Engineering. Girl Scout Juniors—girls in grades 4 and 5—design paddle boats, cranes, and balloon-powered cars; and learn about buoyancy, potential and kinetic energy, machines, and jet propulsion. Following last year’s introduction of Mechanical Engineering badges for girls in grades K–3, the addition of these badges means that ALL Girl Scouts in elementary school now have access to hands-on engineering experiences. Learn more.

Enhancing Girl Scouts’ proven girl-led programming, these new badges and Journeys will set girls up for a lifetime of leadership and success, and prepare them to take action to make the world a better—including greener and more equitable—place for us all.

Today’s youth are increasingly vocal about the change they want to see—and Girl Scouts are the best equipped with the skills needed to make a real impact. In fact, girls who participate in Girl Scouting are more than twice as likelyto exhibit community problem-solving skills than girls who don’t (57 percent versus 28 percent). The important soft skills like confidence and perseverance that Girl Scouts promotes, coupled with the hard skills linked with our standout, 21st-century programming definitely set Girl Scouts apart.

There’s just no doubt about it: Girl Scouts is the single BEST place for girls. Delivering a one-of-a-kind leadership development program (and the largest in the world for girls!), Girl Scouts provides girls with unlimited girl-led adventures found nowhere else. Troops are forming now—join Girl Scouts today. 

GSUSA works with top organizations and specialists in fields that interest today’s girls. These entities advise us and collaborate with us to develop cutting-edge programming for girls. Recent content collaborators include Code.org, the Cyber Innovation Center, robotics educator and author Kathy Ceceri, the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics, the Museum of Science in Boston, and Design Squad Global. Girl Scouts themselves also rigorously tested select new program offerings, including the Think Like a Programmer activities and Space Science and Cybersecurity badges announced last year and available for girls nationwide to earn.

Simple meals with Pie in the Sky Bakery

Submitted by Sally Boyd

Metro Denver

Lakewood

Troop 60697 took a break from cookie sales to finish up their Simple Meals badge at Pie in the Sky Bakery in Longmont. After a great discussion on food safety, Executive Chef Tiffany Price took them on a tour and helped them make their own gluten-free pizza!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Four badges Juniors can earn during the Girl Scout Cookie Program

From Girl Scouts of the USA

When Girl Scout Juniors (grades 4–5) take part in the Girl Scout Cookie Program, they’re helping lead the largest entrepreneurial program for girls in the world. How? By learning essential life skills, setting (and crushing!) impressive goals, and using their cookie earnings to go on epic adventures and make the world a better place—wow!

Many of these incredible skills start with a Girl Scout badge, and we’re exploring all of them! Meet the Junior badges Girl Scouts can earn during cookie season.

After earning the Business Owner badge, Juniors will know the basic steps to plan and create a new business and how to turn their passions into a successful business venture. Once girls decide which type of business they’d like to run, they’ll explore the ins and outs by talking with local business owners to spark ideas and get answers to questions. A new business needs support to get off the ground! So, girls will learn all the ways a new business is financially supported, whether through bank loans or government assistance. Last, to get to know their customers, girls will dive into customer research to see how their new business will reach their community and provide it with a service it needs. Earn the Business Owner badge.

When Juniors earn the Savvy Shopper badge, they’ll know the difference between what they need and want to buy—and how to save for both. In a world of advertisers, social media influencers, and fast-moving trends, it can be hard to determine if that item on display is what you really want to spend your money on or if there is something better to invest in. Through this badge, Juniors will evaluate these important decisions and learn how to make smart spending choices that will benefit them for years to come. Earn the Savvy Shopper badge. 

Through the Cookie CEO badge, Juniors will know how to run all aspects of their cookie business—because they’re cookie bosses, of course! Through this badge, girls are challenged to break their cookie goal into smaller ones (like weekly sales goals) to make sure their troop is on the right track to reach the ultimate goal (like a summer at Girl Scout camp, perhaps?). The troop will work together by dividing up tasks among girls based on their individual skills. They will then put those skills into action when communicating with their customers, making a good impression and building community relationships at the same time. Earn the Cookie CEO badge. 

It’s key to get to know your customers, and through the Customer Insights badge, Juniors will have a better understanding what their cookie customers want, making business even stronger! First, girls will seek out the experts—maybe a local businesswoman who just happens to be a Girl Scout alum? Girls can ask her questions and get some pro tips. Then they’ll dig into research to figure out how to market their Girl Scout Cookies. Girls will create their own surveys and ask customers questions. And if customers still say, “no thanks” to Girl Scout Cookies? No worries! This badge will help girls turn a “no” into a useful business lesson so they improve and gain more confidence. Earn the Customer Insights badge. 

Has your Junior earned one of these awesome badges, but you don’t know where to place it on her vest or sash? Our new visual guide to Girl Scout Junior uniforms can help!

And this cookie season, have your Junior put her new skills to the test by entering Girl Scout Cookie Pro Contest 2018. Six winners (one per Girl Scout grade level) will be selected to win a trip to New York City for the ultimate Cookie Entrepreneur Experience and a spot on the iconic Girl Scout Cookie box! WHOA. Enter today.

Check out the other badges Girl Scouts can earn during cookie season by grade level:

Daisy Brownies | Cadettes | Juniors | Seniors | Ambassadors

Four badges Seniors can earn during the Girl Scout Cookie Program

From Girl Scouts of the USA

As a Girl Scout Senior (grades 9–10) taking part in the Girl Scout Cookie Program, you’re helping lead the largest entrepreneurial program for girls in the world. You’re learning essential life skills, setting (and crushing!) impressive goals, and using your cookie earnings to go on epic adventures and make the world a better place!

Many of these incredible skills and accomplishments start with a Girl Scout badge—and we’re about to explore all of the badges Seniors can earn during cookie season.

Have you thought about where you’re headed after high school? Going to a state university? Community college? Trade school? Wherever your dreams take you, your future education will cost money—luckily, through the Financing My Future badge, you can learn how to plan for those expenses! First you’ll figure out your goals, then you’ll research the types of schools that will help you reach them. Once you have a few options in front of you, you’ll compare and determine which fits your wants and needs the best. Next, the fun part—making your dreams a reality. You’ll explore different financial aid options, including loans and scholarships (such as these!), and starting a savings account. Earn this badge. 

By earning the Buying Power badge, you’ll understand the long-term impact of making a big purchase and how to prepare for it. To get started with this badge, you’ll select an item like a car or new cell phone plan, then compare your options and look up consumer reviews. Next it’s time to dive deep into the numbers! You’ll be challenged to determine the long-term costs of your purchase. Does it require a down payment or payment plan? Should you wait and save more before jumping in? You’ll have to figure it out and build a plan to make sure you’re getting the best deal possible. Earn this badge. 

When you earn the My Portfolio badge, you’ll learn to show how your cookie-selling skills benefit you every single day—and eventually help with college admissions and future job interviews! You’ll start with your cookie resume and portfolio, describing and showcasing all your amazing abilities and accomplishments during cookie season. Then you’ll practice sharing your hard work by role-playing an interview, get advice from experts on marketing yourself, and more! Earn this badge.

Through the Customer Loyalty badge, you’ll take what you already know as a consumer to help you engage customers and ensure customer loyalty during and after cookie season. And think about this: you already know that when you sell Girl Scout Cookies, the money you earn lets your troop participate in epic adventures—but do your customers know? One the best ways to build customer loyalty is by making them feel like a part of your business—and after all, thanks to their purchase, you get closer to your cookie goal. In earning this badge, you’ll also learn how to make your new customers repeat-customers by building your customer database, coming up with unique ways to say “thank you,” and maintaining connections beyond cookie season. Earn this badge. 

Have you earned one of these awesome badges but don’t know where to place it on your vest or sash? Our new visual guide to Girl Scout Senior uniforms can help!

And this cookie season, put your new skills to the test by entering Girl Scout Cookie Pro Contest 2018. Six winners—one per grade level—will be selected to win a trip to New York City for the ultimate Cookie Entrepreneur Experience and a spot on the iconic Girl Scout Cookie box! WHOA. Enter today.

Check out the other badges Girl Scouts can earn during cookie season by grade level:

Daisy Brownies | Cadettes | Juniors | Seniors | Ambassadors