Tag Archives: Fort Collins High School

Gold Award Girl Scout: Jaden Scott, Fort Collins, “Get Up and Dance”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Through the Before and After School Enrichment program in Northern Colorado, also known as BASE Camp, I taught dance classes to 230 kids over the course of a year and made a program where dancers in the area can volunteer, if they are over 15-years-old, to teach dance to kids at elementary schools. My goal was to get kids physically moving where they may not have had the opportunity to do so, while sharing my passion for dance. I also wanted to inspire others my age to teach dance and inspire children as well.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact in the way the children responded to me being there and what they did following my time with them. Each time I went to teach, I could see the kids’ faces light up and get really excited to start dancing. Two girls from one of the schools I taught ended up dancing my choreography at the BASE Camp Family Fun Fair while wearing the “Get Up and Dance” t-shirts I gave out to the students. During spring break, I taught a few of the same children twice and the second time they saw me, they immediately recognized me and got extremely excited. The Group Leaders from each school where I taught, provided me with feedback on how much the kids enjoyed it.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

This project is sustainable because it is a program that dancers will be able to volunteer through for years to come. By having more and more volunteers each year, all of the BASE Camp students will get more of the exercise they need and the enjoyment of dance.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

After finishing this project, I moved to New Hampshire and was able to continue teaching dance to kids in an after school program. I have also shared my story on Facebook with a worldwide group of dancers in hopes of inspiring more to follow my path.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I have all of the qualities to become a great teacher and can be an inspiration to the younger generation. When I started teaching at the first school, I was shy and not very confident while teaching, but when it came time to teach at the last school, my confidence grew and I became much more comfortable in front of all the kids.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

It will impact my future because it is something I can look back on and be proud of as a self-accomplishment. To be able to impact this many kids and more to come in the future, all on my own, is something not many people can say at my age.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award for me has always been a finish line towards the end of someone’s Girl Scout career and a beacon to look to. By having this goal right from the start, now achieving it feels like you’ve made it to the top and have finished it.  It gives me a great sense of accomplishment.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me become a risk-taker and a leader. I was shy and not very confident in myself when I first started teaching, but now I have become a teacher for my dance club at my high school as well as helped the theater director at school teach the dance choreography for the spring play.  I feel more comfortable and confident about it each time I teach. I would’ve never imagined that I would teach this many kids, become a source of inspiration at my age, and have taken this kind of risk before this project.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Rise Above Colorado works to prevent drug abuse

Submitted by Josie Natrasevschi

“Colorado Meth Project Launches Rise Above Colorado to Prevent Drug Abuse Among Colorado Teens”. My name is Josie Natrasevschi I am a senior Girl Scout at FCHS and on the teen advisory council Rise Above Colorado. I see the effects of drugs on peers, friends and family. I have been volunteering with drug prevention for 4 years with 2 years as a teen council member.

This week Fort Collins High School has been actively participating in an effort to be drug free by signing a banner and pledging to be drug free. To see our banner and support our cause go to https://www.facebook.com/riseabovecolorado and click on the letter “R” with Blue Mountains. Our student body is in a contest to be drug free. Like our letter on Facebook and join our cause Rise Above Colorado, to empower teens to lead a life free of drug abuse. There are less teen doing drugs thanks to this program, but now the few that are still doing them have to go to this heroin rehab drug center.

Last night I went to the launch party of Rise Above Colorado in Denver. At the party we viewed a documentary by Cyrus Stowe and Tucker Capps called “Out Of Reach”. To view the trailer click http://www.riseaboveco.org/drug-misuse/?drug=2531 . Cyrus filmed this his junior year of high school. He is currently a senior in Texas. This was a powerful video and recommend parents and teens to talk about RX abuse.

Rise Above Colorado is a drug abuse prevention organization providing Colorado’s teens with information, resources and healthy lifestyle alternatives to help them choose a life free of drug abuse. The Rise Above team proactively collaborates with teens, educators, community leaders and partners to deliver school and community educational presentations, face-to-face outreach and uniquely tailored community prevention efforts across Colorado that impact perceptions and attitudes about drug abuse

Colorado has the second worst rate of pain pill abuse per capita in the United States according to the 2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Teen prescription drug misuse and abuse continues to be a significant health problem threatening youth today.

According to findings from the new Colorado Teen Drug Use and Attitude Assessment commissioned by The Partnership at Drugfree.org and Rise Above Colorado that surveyed 614 Colorado teens, it is critical to reach teens about the risks of drugs in the early teenage years, even as early as 12 years old. The survey found that at 14 and 15 years of age teens’ curiosity about drugs starts to climb, along with their access. By then they need to be educated, empowered and prepared to make smart choices.

Colorado teens not only have easy access to prescription drugs in their own homes and from friends and relatives, but they also have limited accurate information about the risks associated with abusing prescription pain killers or prescription stimulants. The Colorado teen survey found that while 42 percent of teens agree it is easy to get prescription drugs from parents’ medicine cabinets, too few parents are talking to their kids about substances like prescription drugs:

• While parental drug discussions increase as teens reach 16 and 17 years of age, only two-thirds of teens age 14 and under say they have discussed drugs with their parents.

• Of those teens who do discuss drugs with their parents, the conversations focus primarily on alcohol and marijuana without covering other dangerous drugs. Seventy-nine percent of Colorado teens surveyed discussed alcohol risks, and 70 percent of teens discussed marijuana risks with their parents. The parents talks about what issues can give you when you take marijuana, like getting a new job, there are people who uses fake pee to get through the urine test on their interview job, read this article for more info https://urinedrugtesthq.com/quick-fix-synthetic-review/.

• Overall, only 32 percent of teens report they have discussed using prescription drugs with their parents, and even fewer conversations take place with youth 14 years old and younger.

Parents can safeguard prescriptions in their home, educate themselves about the dangers and risks of using prescription medicines and communicate those risks to their children.

“The need to educate Colorado teens and their parents is imperative, and it has to happen now in our communities, homes and schools,” said Colorado Attorney General John Suthers. “Colorado has a prescription drug epidemic on its hands. When prescription opioid supplies are disrupted and the price of pills becomes too high, addicted young people are turning to street opioids. Consequently, heroin use by teenagers is on the rise, check this article out yourself. The efforts of Rise Above Colorado will help educate teens on the risks associated with drug abuse so they may make empowered choices and lead healthy lives.”

Rise Above Colorado is a drug abuse prevention organization providing Colorado’s teens with information, resources and healthy lifestyle alternatives to help them choose a life free of drug abuse. The Rise Above team proactively collaborates with teens, educators, community leaders and partners to deliver school and community educational presentations, face-to-face outreach and uniquely tailored community prevention efforts across Colorado that impact perceptions and attitudes about drug abuse. Rise Above Colorado is affiliated with The Partnership at Drugfree.org, a national nonprofit organization working to help families solve the problem of teen substance abuse.

Please remember to support my service project and share my banner with your friends on Facebook. To see our banner and support our cause go to https://www.facebook.com/riseabovecolorado and click on the letter “R” with Blue Mountains help Rise Above Colorado, to empower teens to lead a life free of drug abuse.