Tag Archives: financial literacy

Girl empowerment through financial literacy: It all adds up

From Girl Scouts of the USA

According to the Girl Scout Research Institute study Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy, girls know they need a solid financial foundation, but few feel confident about their skills. 

Girl Scouts and Toyota Financial Services (TFS) are changing that, through a multiyear partnership developed to help girls become self-reliant, financially informed, and capable of leveraging their talent and business values to make the world a better place. 

Thanks to the partnership, every Girl Scout Junior, Cadette, Senior, and Ambassador can take part in financial-planning activities that let them practice real-life scenarios, like saving for college and building good credit—important stuff! 

One way Girl Scouts and TFS are preparing girls to take charge of their financial education and future is with the TFS “Driving My Financial Future” Tip Sheet—a key resource to help Girl Scouts further strengthen the skills they hone when they earn Financial Literacy badges. These badges can be earned throughout the year and target such practical situations as setting up a budget and engaging in philanthropy.

Efforts like this one build young women’s financial literacy, empowering them for a successful future—tomorrow and in the decades to come.

So what are you waiting for? Accelerate your girl’s future with our awesome Tip Sheet!

 

Banking on our Future: Financial literacy workshops

Are you saving for college, a car, or to take an awesome trip? Do you know what credit is or how to create a budget? Join us for Operation Hope’s Banking on our Future workshops for older Girl Scouts and gain valuable skills and tools for your financial future, also if you want to start earning money from your phone learn to trade on forex, visit learntotrade and get free foreign trading workshops. Operation Hope volunteers will lead sessions on budgeting, saving, planning for your financial future, and more! Girls will learn best ways to manage money and how to fund their dreams and goals.

Cadette Session – Wednesday, February 21, 2018 at 6 p.m. at Montbello Branch Library, 12955 Albrook Drive, Denver, CO 80239. Register by February 14 at goo.gl/kv12BA to attend.

Senior & Ambassador Session – Thursday, February 22 at 6 p.m. at Montbello Branch Library, 12955 Albrook Drive, Denver, CO 80239. Register by February 14 at goo.gl/SV5DWu  to attend.

Contact inquiry@gscolorado.org with questions about registration.

 

 

Financial literacy requires more than a piggy bank

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From Girl Scouts of the USA

Some skills come naturally to us, but for many Americans, learning to be savvy with money takes a lot of work. To help people improve their command of currency, the U.S. Senate in 2004 designated April as Financial Literacy Month. In the spirit of this theme, we’re reflecting on the unique Girl Scout programs that prepare girls to take charge of their financial educations and futures. According to the Girl Scout Research Institute study Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy, girls know they need a solid financial foundation, but few feel confident about their skills.

To help build girls’ confidence, Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) has developed 11 Financial Literacy badges that girls can earn in addition to the badges for Cookie Business. Based on real-life situations, such as budgeting and philanthropy, the badges give young women a deeper understanding of financial literacy, empowering them for future life success.

For girls in underserved communities, we’re proud to continue the “Driving My Financial Future” program, a partnership with Toyota Financial Services (TFS). The program’s goal is to help more than 40,000 girls become financially proficient leaders, learn real-life and age-appropriate financial skills, and develop tools that inspire positive change in their communities. GSUSA interim CEO Sylvia Acevedo expressed, “It’s always gratifying to collaborate with partners such as Toyota Financial Services that understand the importance of instilling financial empowerment in girls and young women, and share the Girl Scout mission of investment in leadership development for our future trailblazers.” Since 2007, TFS has also sponsored the Making Life Easier program, which to date has awarded college scholarships to 1,000 students affiliated with nonprofits, including Girl Scouts.

From coast to coast, the girls who participate in the TFS “Driving My Financial Future”  program receive their own copy of The Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting (which helps them earn their Financial Literacy badges) and a TFS participant patch. Girl Scout Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors also take part in financial planning activities to grow their finance skills by practicing how they’d handle real-life scenarios, such as saving for college or starting to build good credit.

Learn more about the program, which communities participate, and our partnership with Toyota Financial Services.

Financial literacy workshop

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On Sunday, December 11, 2016 eleven Cadette and Senior Girl Scouts came together in Stapleton to participate in a financial literacy workshop hosted by Operation HOPE. Operation HOPE’s “Banking on Our Future” program teaches students in middle and high school basic financial literacy skills and how financial management is tied to dignity.

The workshop started with a discussion about dignity, which is defined as being worthy of esteem and respect. Operation HOPE links financial literacy with dignity and the need to invest in yourself and your community. The girls then learned about budgeting and banking. In pairs, girls were given a profession and created a budget based on their specified income. There were intense debates on whether they could realistically live without electricity in order to afford Starbucks or if they could ride a bike instead of owning a car to save money. 

During the section on banking, girls learned why banks are important, how banks protect your money, and why it is better to put your money into a bank than hiding it in your mattress. The girls learned about checking accounts and practiced writing checks.

One of the session facilitators was a Girl Scout who made sure the girls understood the connection between the financial literacy lessons they were learning with the business skills girls gain through the cookie sale. This event was held at Your Soul’s Movement Performing Arts Center in Stapleton who graciously supported us in supplying a location. This was a fantastic and engaging workshop and we look forward to offering a larger event in the spring!

“Banking on Our Future” workshop

Join us on December 10, 2016 from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Your Soul’s Movement Performing Arts Studio in Denver for Operation Hope’s “Banking on Our Future” workshop for older Girl Scouts and gain valuable skills and tools for your financial future. Operation Hope volunteers will lead sessions on budgeting, saving, planning for your financial future, and more! Girls will learn best ways to manage money and how to fund their dreams and goals.

Register by December 8, 2016 at https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/operation_hope_s_banking_on_our_future_workshop_md_12_10_2016. Contact Katie Singleton at katie.singleton@gscolorado.org for more information.

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Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Emma Albertoni, Arvada, “Down with Dough”

 

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What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My project addressed financial literacy education in schools. As I was preparing to buy a car, and beginning to look at tuition costs and student loans for college, I realized that I didn’t really know much about financial literacy. The current financial literacy curriculum that is taught in public schools in Colorado is limited and woven into other subjects, not giving the students the connection financial literacy has to their life outside of school. Students leaving high school are dealing with bigger amounts of money, no matter if they go to college or not. They’re buying cars, renting apartments, dealing with student loans, and budgets. My goal was to make financial literacy more easily accessed by students by requiring a class in Jefferson County School District High Schools, so the students would directly learn the financial concepts and tools they would need post high school. I began by writing a unit that was implemented in my own high school’s Family Consumer Science class. I then proposed to the Jefferson County School Board for a required Financial Literacy class. I also met with state legislators to discuss how we can work together to improve financial literacy guidelines from a legislative direction.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

In my high school Family Consumer Sciences class, I researched and created a unit on Financial Safety Online. That unit consisted of power points, activities, videos, and discussions. I assigned both pre and post unit quizzes to the students to see their improvement through direct teaching of these financial concepts. Their average class grade increased from a “C” to an “A” demonstrating that direct education of financial literacy topics is effective. Feedback both on Down with Dough Facebook page as well as numerous comments after my 9News segment show that this topic is relatable to many people and they were all encouraging me on this subject. Many aspects of my Gold project are still in process such as the legislative work and what the School Board Curriculum Department will develop over time. I was very happy to get people to see the gap in this important curriculum piece and be willing to look more deeply into it, and take appropriate action.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My unit will be sustained by the Family Consumer Sciences teacher at Ralston Valley who has signed a letter of commitment to continue to teach the unit I created. The Jefferson County School Board is looking for ways to fill the gap between the current curriculums by connecting it to the students’ lives and experiences. I am also working with a Colorado State Legislator, Lang Sias, who is looking to assist with legislative options to provide guidelines for state educators to follow in teaching financial literacy. My brother and I are also starting a non-profit (Down with Dough) to keep the discussion on my issue going, as well as educate students and young adults on financial literacy subjects. We will also work with people, like Representative Sias, to develop a financial literacy event to be held at the Capitol and work to mend the issue in the future. Down With Dough will be effective January 1, 2017.

Locally interest was generated (and maintained) by news media including an article in my school newspaper, my local paper, a segment on 9News and my Facebook page “Down with Dough.”

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Financial literacy affects everyone worldwide. I researched how Colorado compares to other states and how the United States compares to other countries as far as the education of Financial Literacy topics. Nationally, Champlain College’s Center of Financial Literacy graded each state based on their financial literacy requirements. Colorado earned a ‘C’, as financial topics are woven into curriculums, but it isn’t taught directly. Globally, the Program for International Student Assessment submitted a test to 15-year-olds from different countries to test their financial education. The U.S. scores in the bottom 50% of other countries with countries such as China, Australia and the Czech Republic scoring higher.

What did you learn about yourself?

There are several key things that I learned about myself. First, is that I can achieve my goals despite road blocks as long as I don’t give up. It is okay to have to rethink problems and brainstorm alternative solutions. Sticking with something can have huge payoffs in the end. I also learned key things such as prioritizing, organization, and business communications. Probably the most important thing I learned is how to make sure the people who are helping me (my volunteers) know how much I appreciate them and the work they do for me. It is easy to go along and get busy with timelines and projects and assume that people know that you appreciate them but the reality is that you have to make sure you tell them how appreciative you are. If they don’t know that you are grateful for their help, they won’t want to continue helping you. It is very important to make sure they know you need them.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning the Gold Award has shown me I can do anything if I persevere. I will take the memories and skills that I have learned and apply them to everything I will do going forward. I am a stronger, more confident person because of this project.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award to me is the ultimate culmination of everything that I’ve learned over the 12 years that I’ve been a Girl Scout. Service to others, courage to take risks, and a safe and supportive environment to try new things. It is the highest award and is a great way to end my career as a Girl Scout.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

 

Girls’ Choice Badges Are Back: Voting Is Open Through November 15!

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From Girl Scouts of the USA

That’s right! Girls’ Choice badges are back, and we’re SO excited. This year, girls get to vote for one of three awesome badge categories, and they’ll also get to select a badge topic of their choice. Here are this year’s choices, all full of big learning, fun, and adventure—they’re so Girl Scouts!

Outdoors
• Art in the Outdoors
• Camping Skills
• Outdoor Cooking

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math)
• Engineering
• Coding/E-textiles
• Life/Forensic Science

Financial Literacy
• Financing Your Fun Stuff
• Watching Your Dollars Grow
• Social Entrepreneurship

Now, the real fun begins. From October 31 through November 15, girls can vote for their favorite category. What will it be? Outdoors, STEM, or Financial Literacy? That’s a tough one! At the same time, girls will vote for their favorite topic under the category they choose. It’s going to be amazing.

Once the winner is selected, we will be working super hard alongside subject matter experts to develop the badge content and test the activities with girls before we make final decisions. This will help us make sure we create badge activities that truly resonate with girls, and get them really excited about joining in on all the fun and discovery.

Girls will also have a chance to vote on the design of their badge—cool! Stay tuned for info and dates around the design poll. But for now, we encourage you to empower every Girl Scout you know to vote, vote, vote! We need every adult to help girls make sure their voices are heard, and encourage them take advantage of the opportunity to create their very own Girl Scout experience—it’s such an important part of the magic! The time to vote is now.

Brownie troop visits bank

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Submitted by Lori Stott
Lyons

Brownie Troop 3982 worked on their Penny Power Try-it while visiting the Valley Bank and Trust in Lyons on April 18. The girls learned how to write checks, start a savings account and got to see the vault!

This story was submitted via the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.