Tag Archives: Eaglecrest High School

Gold Award Girl Scout continues to give back

Submitted by Victoria Fedorco

Metro Denver

Denver

I remember working and earning my Gold Award like it was yesterday. Since May 2017, I’ve graduated from Eaglecrest High School and went on to attend Metropolitan State University of Denver. During my first semester, I’ve given multiple speeches about “Adopt Don’t Shop” and the care of senior pets and how those issues have influenced my Gold Award. I’ve been keeping tabs on the Adams County Animal Shelter and found that the PVC Pipe pet beds have made a great impact on the comfort level of the senior pets and others at the shelter. I continue to speak about senior pets and their struggles and have written a research paper on the subject to help continue to educate and raise awareness.

I’ve used the leadership and management skills the Gold Award program taught me to become more involved in my college as well. I have become the Director of Game Day Operations for the Metro State Men’s Hockey Team. I have organized an upcoming event for the team: The Metro State Hockey Teddy Bear Toss. My love of Girl Scouts has stayed with me as well, as I have registered as a co-leader for my little sister’s troop. I will continue to work with them and encourage them to be their best selves and go for gold!

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Sarah Ness, Centennial, “Destressing Art Sessions”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My Gold Award project was created to address the high amount of stress seen in the student body at my high school, Eaglecrest High School. I held art sessions after school in the art rooms in order to help kids at my school be able to relieve stress. I worked with the National Art Honor Society and Art Club, along with the teachers that sponsor both of those clubs, in order to hold the art sessions. At the end, I had held 23 sessions.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact by giving students a survey I had made and asking them if they were feeling stressed and if they thought that the session helped to relieve their stress. In the surveys, 100% of the people surveyed answered that they were feeling stressed, with the reasons why being “family,” “schoolwork,” “work,” “sleep or the lack thereof,” and “expectations for the future.” Along with that, 100% of the survey takers said that the session did help them feel less stressed.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global/national connection is made through the access to free downloads of a manual for the sessions, and some project examples, on the website teacherspayteachers.com. I’ve also created an Instagram account that is dedicated to examples of project ideas and step-by-step instructions for how to do the projects.

What did you learn about yourself?

I’ve learned that I’m a lot more adaptable to situations that I wasn’t expecting and that I’m more capable of being a leader than what I was expecting.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I think earning my Gold Award will help show others that I am a hard worker and very dedicated. It has also taught me better ways to deal with stress around me and to help others around me deal with their stress in a healthier way.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it allowed me to use all of the skills that I have gained through my years of being a Girl Scout, along with helping me gain new ones, to make a lasting difference in the world. It helped me draw on all of my past experiences and really make the most out of everything that Girl Scouts has taught me.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award helped me become a

-G (Go-getter): by forcing me to do what I needed to do right now and not allowing me time to procrastinate or not try and do something that was needed.

-I (Innovator): by making me come up with ways to describe every step of an artistic process so that even someone who might think he or she isn’t artistic is able to do the same project as everyone else.

-R (Risk Taker): by causing me to step out of my comfort zone with talking to large groups and teachers, even though I knew that there was a chance that no one would want to help me. I also took a risk with doing an art-centered project because many people aren’t interested in the arts or don’t believe that they could do any projects, so I was taking a risk in the possibility that no one would even come to my sessions.

-L (Leader): by making me step into a leadership position and have to become a kind of teacher to the other students in the sessions along with having to come up with all of the projects and getting ready all of the materials that might be needed to do each of the projects.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Victoria Fedorco, Aurora, “Caring Cots for Senior Pets”

Victoria Fedorco

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My Gold Award project was manufacturing and providing raised PVC pipe pet beds to help senior pets be more comfortable in shelters as they await adoption.  I decided to make these type of beds because they are beneficial to pets and shelters in that: the elevated design allows the dog’s weight to be evenly distributed and keep them off any cold, hard floor. They worked great for both dogs and cats. The light, durable nature of these beds also allows them to be easily placed outdoors as well. They were durable and can last for a long time.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The way I measured my impact was when I helped people and their families realize that there are challenges that exist when owning a senior pet, they asked questions and wanted to help me with my project.  I witnessed their understanding that leaving these animals in a shelter, for whatever reason, that there are factors that can hinder the senior pet’s quality of life. Specifically, I saw that I had impacted Troop 550 the most in that: they are going to work towards their own Gold Award Projects and work to make a difference in their community.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable in that these beds can be easily built and are already in use by the shelter I worked with. In addition, I have provided a master copy of instructions for the shelter to use when building new beds for themselves along with sharing that list with others, spreading the word of “Caring Cots” further. My project will also be sustained beyond my involvement by a signed letter of commitment by Andrew Brooks, the Lead Volunteer Coordinator at the Adams County Animal Shelter in Commerce City.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have created a Powerpoint presentation/tutorial that has a materials list and step-by-step instructions on the construction of these beds along with a some pictures to go along with it. I have posted a link to the powerpoint on my Facebook page to spread my project through this social media platform. The same link has been posted to my Pinterest page, available for all the view. Both of these pages have been created as a Gold Award Project.

What did you learn about yourself?

What I learned about myself is the level of determination and focus that I have. “Caring Cots” has helped me improve my leadership skills by having me organize an entire workshop and overnight for my building team. This allowed me to really get a sense of being in charge and having to instruct others. This project has also helped me improve my public speaking skills; I’ve started to feel more comfortable talking in front of a group of people about my project and my opinions.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

By earning my Gold Award I have cemented my name in the Gold Award Hall of Fame and proven to myself that I am capable of doing amazing things to give back to my community. This project will also be on my resume, which will help me get into college and get the job I’m looking for. I also think this project will impact my future in that I will be an example to other girls working on their own Gold Awards.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I’ve earned my Bronze and Silver Award previously and getting my Gold Award was a huge goal for me. I absolutely love everything about Girls Scouts and I feel that earning my Gold Award was the perfect way to show my love and appreciation for this organization. I feel extremely honored to be a recipient of the Gold Award and I feel that my Girl Scout experience has made me a Girl Scout for life.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org