Tag Archives: Denver

Girl Scout Daisies make lunch for Ronald McDonald House residents

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Submitted by Christina Bontempo
Denver

Kindergarten and 1st Grade Daisies made lunch for the residents of the Ronald McDonald House in Denver on Saturday, May 11. The girls chose RMH as their service action project and used funds raised by cookie sales to purchase lunch items. They made sandwiches and served fresh fruit and learned about the families who can stay at RMH for free while their children are in area hospitals.

This story was submitted via the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Troop 3573 helps Alzheimer’s patients for Bronze Award project

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Submitted by Kristin Coulter
Denver

Girl Scout Troop 3573 chose to help Alzheimer’s patients as their Bronze Award project. Several of the girls had personal experiences with family members with the disease. The girls had planned to make scrapbooks for the residents of the Alzheimer’s center but when they visited the center they noticed that the patients were cold. Even though the center was quite warm the residents were wearing sweaters and coats. Older people can feel cold easily. They often have little body fat or take medications that can lower their body temperature. The girls worked together to make 35 fleece blankets for the patients. They visited the center as often as they could. They also brought cookies, sang songs and made friends. They were able to complete this project through teamwork, using their cookie money and donations. Thank you to everyone who supported them on their journey to make the world a better place!

This story was submitted via the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scouts announces 2013 Denver metro-area Women of Distinction

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Girl Scouts of Colorado is announcing the 2013 inductees into the esteemed Women of Distinction program in the Denver metro-area at a private reception on June 4 at the home of 2002 Woman of Distinction and 2013 Thin Mint Dinner co-chair Elaine Gantz Berman (photos from the June 4th event). This year’s eight Denver metro-area honorees were selected by a committee of their peers led by Selection Chair Dr. Jandel Allen-Davis, Vice President of Government and External Relations at Kaiser Permanente Colorado and 2012 Woman of Distinction, and chosen based on their contributions to the community, both professionally and personally. The Women of Distinction commit to supporting Girl Scouts of Colorado and serving Girl Scouts today.

The Women of Distinction program began in the Denver area in 1997. Including this year’s honorees, Girl Scouts of Colorado has recognized 395 women with this honor. The Women of Distinction is widely regarded as one of Denver’s premier philanthropic programs, bringing together a group of women dedicated to raising funds to support Girl Scout leadership programs. More than $2 million has been raised in 16 years.

Later this year, Girl Scouts of Colorado will publicly honor these inductees at the 2013 Thin Mint Dinner in Denver. This event will be from 5:30-8:30 p.m. on Oct. 10 at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel and will once again spotlight Girl Scouts’ Live Healthy, Lead Healthy initiative, focusing on self-esteem, good nutrition and exercise. Paula Herzmark, Executive Director of the Denver Health Foundation and 2002 Woman of Distinction, and Elaine Gantz Berman, Colorado State Board of Education and 2002 Woman of Distinction, are event co-chairs.

For more information on the Oct. 10 event, including how you can help, please contact Amy Myers at 303-607-4896 or amy.myers@gscolorado.org. You can also visit our website for more information or to purchase tickets and/or sponsorships at girlscoutsofcolorado.org/women-of-distinction-denver.

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Denver metro-area 2013 Women of Distinction: 

  • Denise Burgess, President/General Manager, Burgess Services, Inc.
  • Michelle M. Lucero, Esq., Chief Legal Officer, Children’s Hospital Colorado
  • Karen Nakandakare, Diversity, Inclusion & Community Investment, CH2M HILL
  • Kristin Richardson, Community Volunteer, Smithsonian National Board, Smithsonian Science Education Board, Children’s Hospital Colorado & Foundation Boards, TBD Colorado Board
  • Christine M. Riordan, Ph.D., Former Dean, Daniels College of Business, University of Denver, Provost, University of Kentucky 
  • Mimi Roberson, President/CEO, Presbyterian/St. Luke’s Medical Center & Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children at P/SL
  • Regina M. Rodriguez, Partner, Faegre Baker Daniels LLP
  • Shari F. Shink, Esq., Founder/President Emeritus, Rocky Mountain Children’s Law Center

Media coverage of announcement: Denver Business Journal

Girl Scouts celebrate Earth Day

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Ninety Girl Scouts of all ages gathered at the Denver Girl Scout Service Center on Sunday, April 21st, for an Earth Day event. The participants learned how they can play a part in helping their planet Earth with activities including building a miniature “petal-powered” car out of recycled materials, learning about plants and the water cycle, constructing a water filtration system, conducting an energy audit of the Girl Scout office, and building solar ovens and mini-wind turbines. All activities were part of the It’s Your Planet – Love It! Journey program. Volunteers with the Energy Service Corps. helped plan and carry out this event. View more photos from the event here. Girl Scouts of the USA also was there filming footage for their video collection.

Posted by Amanda Kalina, PR Director, Girl Scouts of Colorado. Photos by Wendy Kent, Art Director, Girl Scouts of Colorado.

ALL THINGS HORSES GIRL SCOUTS OF COLORADO UPDATE!

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CRAZY ‘BOUT HORSES!  OPEN TO ALL BROWNIES and JUNIORS

All Brownies and Juniors:  We’ve opened up the Crazy ‘bout Horses event May 4th to ALL BROWNIES!  Come watch a Horse Show and learn all there is to know about horses with us May 4th at the National Western Event Center in Denver!  Three very lucky Girl Scouts who attend will each win two hours of riding time at Tomahawk: you can use the two hours to go on trail ride with your mom and dad and siblings, or have a lesson or two – registration based on availability. The Colorado Classic Horse Show is a multi-breed horse show which features Arabians American Saddlebreds, and Morgans.  It is a three day show May 3-5th with two sessions daily, starting at 10 am and 6 pm.  The Classic Horse Show is a charity show and the proceeds from the show are donated to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Horse Program. Saturday the 4th at the show is Girl Scout Day.  Girl Scouts come to the show and watch the performance, then have a special three hour introduction to horses.  This introduction includes a hands- on period where the girls learn to groom and care for a horse.  A professional farrier teaches the girls about feet and shoeing and we also have a session where the girls learn about wild horses and famous horses. The Girl Scout event is $10 per person, adults welcome to attend as well, but the Classic Horse Show is free to watch. Come early and watch the show!  Registration opens at noon for the Girl Scout event.  The Girl Scout event will run from 1pm-4:30pm.  Come get an activity booklet to do as you walk through the stations, a fun patch, and chance to win two hrs or riding time at Tomahawk!

TOMAHAWK RIDING and Riding this Fall at MMR!

Our hourly riding sessions at Tomahawk are slowly ending, May 4th and 5th will be our final weekend for hour riding sessions. . .we will start offering rides again in August after resident camp is over.  If you missed out don’t fret, we will be offering rides at Tomahawk AND Meadow Mt Ranch in August and September! This coming fall you can come ride at both locations for the great Girl Scout price of $20 for members per hour or $35 for non members.  Starting in August Meadow Mt Ranch will offer lessons and well as trail rides into RMNP with great views of our 14ers and snow caps, as well as alpine terrain, waterfalls, and alpine lakes.  . . majority of our rides are 3-4 hrs.  Tomahawk will be offering trail rides for hour or 2 as well as lessons and games on horseback! Sessions will be posted soon for fall season!

Silver project benefits hospitalized children

Submitted by Debbie Z
Denver

So far my troop and I have been working on our Silver Award. We are officially near the end. We decided to collect and make a bunch of items for children in a hospital. First we all had to make our own personalized flyer for advertising what we needed. We all collected enough for four hospitals. We also had to call the hospitals we wanted to do before doing our flyer. All of them accepted of course. After we got everything, we all sorted it between the hospitals. Then we had to make 100 fleece blankets and 80 pillows. We all had a blast! Now everything is done and ready to deliver to the hospitals. We can’t wait! One of the hospitals is gonna let us go up to a kid and give some to him. Each of us get to do one. Our troop really liked this project and we certainly can’t wait to continue doing community projects and other activities with the GSCO. 😀

This story was submitted via the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout troop starts at VOA’s Brunetti Lofts

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Troop 1287 is a brand new troop of girls who are living at a local Volunteers of America facility, which is helping single-parent families on the road to self-sufficiency. The kindergarten-fifth grade troop of Girl Scouts meets weekly at Brunetti Lofts in downtown Denver.

On Sunday, Feb. 10th, the troop held a Girl Scout Cookie Booth Sale at the Brunetti Lofts and sold 100 packages. The girls have sights set on using the money they’ve raised through cookie sales to go to Girl Scout summer camp, among other activities, according to troop leaders, Jenifer Woods and Marcie Tidd.

One of the largest takeaways the girls are learning through Girl Scouting is how to give back to their community. Many of the girls have commented that they hope they can organize a project to give back to Brunetti Lofts.

This is one of the many Girl Scout groups in Colorado which provides programming to girls in underserved areas. Girl Scouts provides all girls the opportunity to learn how they can become a leader who makes a difference in the world.

Article in Denver’s YourHub

Blog submitted by Amanda Kalina, Director of Public Relations, and Amy Myers, Director of Development

Girl Scout Wranglers-in-Training and older girl volunteers needed

We are looking for volunteers – older Girl Scouts who are crazy about horses and Girl Scout WITs (at least going into WIT I program in 2013) – to help us with an exciting horse event for Girl Scout Juniors and Bridging Brownies! Older girl volunteers will rotate as assistance at the stations and help the professionals while learning along with the girls. Any volunteers in the WIT program (or going into WIT program in 2013) will have the hours count towards their WIT training.

The event is for bridging Girl Scout Brownies and Juniors who will spend a full afternoon of hands-on, horse-related activities while they earn a fun horse patch. All Girl Scouts will be able to watch a show horse competition at the Colorado Classic Horse Show. Girl Scout Juniors and Brownies will rotate through stations to learn about: veterinary care, horse shoeing, horse breeds, behavior, safety around horses, grooming and a barn tour, plus more fun horsey info.

The date of the event is May 4th, 2013 at the National Western Event Center in Denver, CO from 1:30-4pm. Volunteers will need to be there by 10am to help with set up, etc.

If you are interested, please contact Julie Fischer at julie.fischer@gscolorado.org or 303-747-2512.

What is the secret to the world’s largest girl-run business?

The secret to the Girl Scout Cookie Program is what’s in the box, and I don’t mean the cookies!

To some the secret might be just a wagon full of cookies and a smile!  As Evelyn, Brownie Girl Scout from Lakewood and Auburn, Daisy Girl Scout from Littleton demonstrated on Sunday, January 27th as cookies kicked off!

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What is really in a box of cookies?  Selling cookies teaches 5 skills; goal setting, decision making, money management, people skills and business ethics-aspects that are essential to leadership and to life.

So . . .just how does the cookie crumble here in Colorado?  What happens to that $3.50 a customer pays for a package of cookies?   $1.84 is used for local (Colorado) Girl Scout programming     $0.92 pays the bakery for the product     $0.72 goes to the troop as proceeds (starting at $0.60/pkg) and recognitions, and  $0.02 is other sale costs

What was my secret to selling cookies?  Being an older Girl Scout (5th-12th grade) was tough!  We used to buddy up and hit as many apartment buildings (especially ones with stairs) as we could during door to door presales (no Cookies Now! then) because we knew they were less likely to already have been asked.

The theme of the cookie program this year is What can a girl do?  So share with us, just what can a girl do?   What was or is your secret to a successful cookie program?

Alumna Blog: Girl Scouts teaches lifelong lessons on education, career and community

By Girl Scout Alumna Sherri Vasquez of Denver (Girl Scout Woman of Distinction 2007)

Girl Scouts has just finished celebrating its 100th anniversary year, a testament to its enduring tradition of teaching young girls good old-fashioned values that never go out of style.

The heart of the Girl Scout philosophy centers on respect for self, others and the environment, core beliefs that will move this valuable organization forward during the next 100 years.

Encouraging girls to do their best is especially relevant today because so many are facing overcrowded classrooms at school, depleted finances at home and over-exposed celebrities promoting instant fame and fortune over honesty and fairness.

Time-tested for a century, Girls Scouts is a wonderful way for girls to learn valuable skills and lessons that will help them grow into responsible adults with ethics, moral and standards.

When I became a Girl Scout 42 years ago, little did I know how much the experience would affect my adult life, especially my education, career and community involvement.

Becoming a Girl Scout was my first experience in goal-setting. Although I was only five years old, I vowed to achieve my dream, waiting impatiently to reach the second grade so I could join Girl Scout Brownies.

My father wore an Army uniform and my brother a Boy Scout uniform, so I wanted the honor and privilege of wearing one too. The independence of becoming part of something outside of school and family was a new and exciting concept for me.

The anticipation of joining an organization “just for girls” was just too much for a first grader to bear, so I joined the Camp Fire Girls to help me “practice” to be a Girl Scout Brownie.

When I finally put on my Brownie uniform, I was so proud of it and what it stood for that I wore it everywhere, including my second-grade class picture.

Little girls have lots of energy, and Girl Scouts was an incredibly positive outlet for an active kid like me. I loved it because I had the opportunity to meet new friends, create arts and crafts, take field trips to local businesses and enjoy outdoor adventures. My mother, by then a working single parent, loved Girl Scouts because it gave me a safe, caring place to go after school.

During my five years as a Girl Scout, I learned important lessons about being responsible for myself and respectful of others. Together, my troop learned to care about the environment.

Girl Scouts also provided a valuable place to learn about group dynamics, especially how to interact with peers and authority figures. That sense of sisterhood later motivated me to join the girls’ gymnastics team, cheerleading squad and eventually a college sorority.

Earning badges at a young age evolved into achieving higher goals as I grew up, such as graduating from high school, applying to college, and participating in a study-abroad program in Spain. Finding the courage to leave home and travel to a faraway country seemed easier because Girl Scouting had instilled a sense of independence and stirred my intellectual curiosity.

Not only did it teach my young mind how to travel in new directions and find creative ways to reach those destinations, it gave me the confidence to explore my passion for fascinating places and topics, plan strategies to learn more about them, and persist in those efforts.

These early lessons came into play once again when finishing a bachelor’s degree, starting a career in journalism, and completing a master’s degree.

Even selling Girl Scout Cookies was a useful tutorial, teaching business basics and helping develop a taste for community spirit and entrepreneurism that continues in adulthood.

Although it has been decades since I first donned a Girl Scout uniform, I still try to live by the Girl Scout Law of helping people at all times, whether it be as a journalist shining light on inequities or as a community activist involved in worthwhile causes like education and youth development.

Since Girls Scouts provided such a strong foundation in my early years, I would like to express my heart-felt gratitude for its amazing influence on my life, education and career. Because it offers hope to generations of girls to come, I wish it continued success and growing ranks in the 21st century and beyond.

Sherri Vasquez is the host and producer of Latin View.