Tag Archives: day at the capitol

Colorado lawmakers honor Gold Award Girl Scouts

On Monday, April 8, Colorado State Senators broke from traditional business to honor 42 Gold Award Girl Scouts from across Colorado. More than half of this year’s honorees were at this recognition, which took place shortly after the session opened at 10 a.m. To earn the Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts, each of these young women completed a large-scale project that solves a community problem not only in the short-term, but for years into the future. By doing so, they’ve gained extraordinary leadership and citizenship skills that mark them as valuable contributors to their communities and world.

In addition to honoring these Girl Scouts and their extraordinary Gold Award projects that benefited communities across the world, Girl Scouts of Colorado introduced the winners of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize and the Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award. Emily Kretschmer from Colorado Springs received the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. She partnered with the nonprofit Status: Code 4 to produce a documentary to raise awareness of the hardships families of first responders can face and start meaningful conversations amongst families themselves. The Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize was made possible through a generous gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment by Girl Scouts of Colorado President & CEO Stephanie A. Foote. “Emily’s project is an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. I am proud to present this prize to her and recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

Emily was honored along with three other Gold Award Girl Scouts, who the selection committee for the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize determined were deserving of Honorable Mention. Madeline Ford from Englewood partnered with the Boys & Girls Club to create a five-session literacy program to promote a positive reading environment and teach children new ways to express themselves through books and poetry. To tackle the stigma for girls in some countries around the menstrual cycle, Maya Hegde from Englewood developed a program to teach girls in underdeveloped countries girls how to make reusable sanitary pads with materials they have and how to sell sanitary pads in their own communities.  Keaton Maring from Arvada built a life jacket loaner station at Standley Lake. Along with the station, she created an educational sign and a sustainable loaning program for the life jackets to provide more people with lifesaving equipment.

Mykaela Ryan from Broomfield was awarded the Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award. She drew on her personal experiences with stuttering to create a video and educational presentation to inform high schoolers about how to interact with someone who stutters. Mykaela demonstrated bravery and pride by presenting her project directly to students at her own school, and beyond, to raise awareness and stop bullying. This award is given in memory of Girl Scout Gold Award Mentor Debbie Haskins, who had a passion for working with older Girl Scouts. It recognizes one outstanding Gold Award Girl Scout from Colorado who exemplifies the Girl Scout spirit through courage, confidence, and character.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Foote. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership are making the world a better place.”

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

The following Colorado Girl Scouts are among the 42 statewide who will be receiving the prestigious Gold Award for the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards year:

  • Mia Aguon from Parker, Ponderosa High School, was inspired to prevent the use of vaporizers inside of businesses in her community. She created straightforward and informative “No Smoking Including E-Cigarettes” signs to raise awareness for customers and allow business owners to be supported in not allowing indoor vaping.
  • Brittany Argo from Aurora, Cherokee Trail High School, built a prayer garden at St. Michael the Archangel’s and aided in the construction of a prayer garden at a church in the Philippines.
  • Danise Bachman from Northglenn, Colorado Preparatory Academy, discovered through her own experience with grief a lack of resources for children, especially around the holidays. She partnered with Judi’s House to create thoughtful coloring and activity pages for children experiencing grief to reflect on their special person.
  • Evyn Batie from Loveland, Mountain View High School, led a team of students to create the Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide, an electronic compilation of some of the best youth mental health resources across the region.
  • Mackenzie Block from Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, partnered with Ronald McDonald Charities to create a treasure closet, so children staying at the house in Colorado Springs can play with and check-out new and engaging toys. She also put together a how-to guide, which she shared with other Ronald McDonald Charities across Colorado and the United States.
  • Inspired by her own struggles with mental illness, Trinity Brubaker from Longmont, Lyons Middle/Senior High School, created a Free Little Library focused on mental health resources. She also developed and taught a comprehensive curriculum to local students to raise awareness about mental health issues.
  • After learning that many people don’t know how often they need to replace their smoke detectors and the dangers of having a defective smoke detector, Cassidy Christian from Highlands Ranch took action. She developed a “Smoke Detector 101” resource in Spanish and English. She also designed and distributed magnets to remind families to change their smoke detectors.
  • Bryce Civiello from Evergreen, Conifer High School, designed a pamphlet for teens that can help them take the first steps toward getting help from a mental health professional.
  • Emily Clark from Colorado Springs, Rampart High School, used her own artistic ability to create a comprehensive and engaging art curriculum for fourth graders centered around what it means to be a naturalist. She partnered with a local school to teach the lessons herself and adapt the program to be used in many different educational settings.
  • Emma Conroy from Golden, Golden High School, lives with epilepsy and was inspired to help children who may feel intimidated by getting an EEG, so she created an educational video on what to expect when getting an EEG. She also developed an informative card to direct individuals to her video and partnered with local hospitals to share it with patients and families.
  • Kayla Davis from Granby, Middle Park High School, designed, built, and installed an adaptive obstacle course for the National Sports Center for the Disabled for use with their athletes. She also acquired a grant to purchase a box trailer to easily transport the obstacle course so more athletes can use it across Colorado.
  • Daisy Deane from Littleton, Regis Jesuit High School, partnered with Carson Nature Center to build mason bee houses and created an educational program for children to learn about mason bees and how they help the environment. The nature preserve continues to maintain the informational program and the mason bee houses.
  • Mariam Dhunna from Aurora, Grandview High School, created a pen pal program for children ages 11-19 living with epilepsy to show them that they are not alone and encourage them to be social. Mariam also taught a comprehensive social skills curriculum for the children focused on learning how to feel confident in establishing new relationships.
  • Sarah Dormer from Greenwood Village, Cherry Creek High School, upcycled 76 dog waste bag dispensers that her city was going to throw away by turning them into solitary beehives and birdhouses. She then distributed the beehives and birdhouses to community members at the Greenwood Village Earth Day celebration.
  • Brooke Eshbach from Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, invented and built creative models of training aids for service dogs in partnership with the Paw Pals Assistance Dogs organization. Her training aids have been so helpful and successful that she now has a pending patent for the design.
  • Amy Fishman from Boulder, Fairview High School, created and taught a curriculum to encourage teens to take initiative in their connection with nature and environmental stewardship. The program she designed introduces engaging issues and gives students the tools to take action outdoors.
  • Angela Foote from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, developed a relationship between the organizations Family Promise of Denver and Denver Tech for All to ensure low-resource students and families have ongoing access to computers.
  • Madeline Ford from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Boys & Girls Club to create a five-session literacy program, which promotes a positive reading environment and teaches children new ways to express themselves through books and poetry.
  • Summer Gehman from Littleton, Columbine High School, created a fully functioning library for children with life-threatening diseases who attend camp at Roundup River Ranch every summer. She hosted a book drive and was able to fill the library with 1,307 books and developed a sustainable check-in and check-out program for the library.
  • Littlepage Green from Breckenridge, Summit High School, created a lesson plan and video to educate students about food allergies. In-person lessons also included training on how to properly use an epi-pen.
  • Through her own experiences with central auditory processing disorder, Kristine Guy from Monument, Colorado Springs Early Colleges, realized teachers and educators are the best resource for students to help identify the disorder within themselves. She created a comprehensive training for teachers, and developed a website and pamphlet, available in English and Spanish.
  • Maya Hegde from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Mangala Seva Orphanage in India and Brydges Centre in Kenya to teach girls how to make reusable sanitary pads using materials they already have. The program she developed also taught the girls how to sell sanitary pads in their own communities to tackle the stigma around the menstrual cycle.
  • Kimberly Jones from Colorado Springs partnered with her local humane society to create a comprehensive and supportive volunteer training program to support their Pets Day for children event. She also shared her curriculum for other humane societies around the country.
  • Emily Kretschmer from Colorado Springs, Air Academy High School, produced a documentary in partnership with the nonprofit Status: Code 4. The purpose of her documentary is to raise awareness of the hardship families of first responders can face and start meaningful conversations amongst families themselves.
  • Emma Lilly from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a website, created a podcast, and wrote a children’s book celebrating the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory and its historical significance.
  • Keaton Maring from Arvada, Ralston Valley High School, built a life jacket loaner station at Standley Lake. Along with the station, she created an educational sign and a sustainable loaning program for the life jackets to provide more people with lifesaving equipment.
  • Grace Matsey from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, created a music tutoring program for elementary and middle school musicians, which was run by members of her high school’s Music Honor Society.
  • Mckayla Nelson from Colorado Springs created a comprehensive guide for parents and families called “Ready for Kindergarten,” which helps prepare students for success in school. The guide is available in English and Spanish and is being used by teachers and administrators across the state.
  • Annarlene Nikolaus from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon High School, oversaw the construction of a series of buddy benches for local K-12 public schools. Students also participated in age-appropriate lessons led by Annarlene about buddy benches and what they can do to be better friends.
  • Mykaela Ryan from Broomfield, Broomfield High School, created a video and educational presentation to inform high schoolers about how to interact with someone who stutters. As someone who experiences stuttering herself, she demonstrated bravery and pride by presenting her project directly to students at her own school, and beyond, to raise awareness and stop bullying.
  • Alyson Serio from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, called upon her own interest in graphic arts to inspire a new generation of students in her community to explore STEM through photography. She developed a photography and Photoshop club at her local middle school to get more children engaged in photography.
  • Bailey Stokes from Buena Vista, Buena Vista High School, created outdoor-based lesson plans for the use of fourth grade science teachers across Colorado. Topics covered included investigations, habitat, and adaptations.
  • Abigail Stuart from Aurora, Grandview High School, connected local food pantries with elementary schools to create a program in which she encouraged students to donate their unopened lunch snacks to their local food pantry. Over the course of her project 1,900 items were successfully donated at just one of the schools, and the schools continue to donate.
  • In memory of her friend who was killed by a drunk driver, Samantha Stuart from Aurora, Grandview High School, took action to raise awareness among her peers of the dangers of drunk driving and the need for blood donors. She planned and implemented a blood drive at her school that included educational booths on the dangers of impaired driving.
  • Victoria Tilden of Denver, East High School, noticed through her own gymnastics experience that students were often getting hurt and dropping out of the sport. To address this, she created a workshop and comprehensive training video on how to prevent injuries and how to fall safely in gymnastics. Victoria also partnered with local gyms to share and teach her curriculum to gymnasts and coaches.
  • Emily Turner of Denver, East High School, educated the public about loving a shelter pet who exhibits aggressive behavior and placed the spotlight on her own dog, Hugo. Along with Hugo, she created online training resources to raise awareness of dog aggression and give useful and practical training tips to owners.
  • Katherine Walden from Larkspur, Castle View High School, taught elementary school students about the importance of bees and how to install bee boxes that local bee species and other pollinators can call home.

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Colorado lawmakers honor Gold Award Girl Scouts

On Monday, April 9, 2018, Colorado State Representatives broke from traditional business to honor 40 Gold Award Girl Scouts from across Colorado. More than half of this year’s honorees were at this recognition, which took place shortly after the session opened at 10 a.m. To earn the Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts, each of these young women completed a large-scale project that solves a community problem not only in the short-term, but for years into the future. By doing so, they’ve gained extraordinary leadership and citizenship skills that mark them as valuable contributors to their communities and world.

In addition to honoring these Girl Scouts and their extraordinary Gold Award projects that benefited communities across the world, Girl Scouts of Colorado introduced the winners of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize and the Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award. Riley Morgenthaler from Morrison received the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. She created Creativity Tool Tubs to help close the gap that students living in low-resource areas face when participating in the STEM-based activity, Destination Imagination. The Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize was made possible through a generous gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment by Girl Scouts of Colorado President & CEO Stephanie A. Foote. “Riley’s project is an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. I am proud to present this prize to her and recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

Riley was honored along with one other Gold Award Girl Scout, whom the selection committee for the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize determined was deserving of Honorable Mention. Marieke van Erven from Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the elections department into high school government classes.

Elizabeth Hoelscher from Aurora was named the first recipient of the Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award. She partnered with Avanti House, which houses teenage survivors of sex trafficking, to build a new library for the home and create welcome baskets for the girls. This award is given in memory of Girl Scout Gold Award Mentor Debbie Haskins, who had a passion for working with older Girl Scouts. It recognizes one outstanding Gold Award Girl Scout from Colorado who exemplifies the Girl Scout spirit through courage, confidence, and character.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Foote. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance and leadership are making the world a better place.”

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

The following Colorado Girl Scouts are among the 40 statewide who will be receiving the prestigious Gold Award for the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards year:

  • Losing a close family friend to testicular cancer inspired Geneva Ascher from Breckenridge, Summit High School, to teach young people how to properly perform self breast and testicular exams. The lesson plans she created and delivered to her classmates will continue to be used by her school.
  • Meg Bleylefrom Highlands Ranch, Highlands Ranch High School, worked to increase the bee population by teaching children about how people need and depend on bees.
  • Beth Bolonfrom Longmont hosted a workshop for sixth through ninth grade girls to help them improve their communication skills and bolster their confidence when interacting with others.
  • Cheyanne Bridgesfrom Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, partnered with the Pikes Peak Humane Society to support their animal medical fund by providing a sustainable source of donations from her school.
  • Tara Butlerfrom Denver, Overland High School, created a course and curriculum specifically for senior citizens to educate them on how to use their smartphone and better understand the technology.
  • Nicole Choma from Breckenridge, Summit High School, developed a partnership between her own rugby team and a local after school program designed to promote physical activity and healthy eating behaviors in children. Older students taught a rugby lesson at elementary schools around Summit County.
  • Kayleigh Cornellfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, started the Colorado Book Bank and collected more than 1,300 new and gently used books for students in a summer lunch program.
  • Aubree Crockett from Colorado Springs, Vanguard High School, wanted to create understanding and acceptance between people around the world while inspiring people to create positive change on their own. She did this through distributing electronic kits, which included a digital camera and instructions for how people could share their daily life, to people all over the world. Fifty-two participants and 25+ partner organizations have all received a copy of the book and more stories are being collected and added to the project.
  • Peyton Dailey from Centennial, Grandview High School, created a coalition between Spanish Honor Society students at her school and the Independent Learning Communities program, to provide ILC students the opportunity to learn and practice Spanish in a one-on-one setting.
  • Victoria Delatefrom Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, created a four-week self-defense course to give her fellow students the knowledge and skills to protect themselves from sexual assault.
  • Emma Deutschfrom Denver, Rocky Mountain School of Expeditionary Learning, improved the cat rooms at the Denver Animal Shelter. By creating a more welcoming and colorful space, she encouraged more people to adopt cats.
  • Kamaryn Evansfrom Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, worked to raise awareness for victims of domestic violence and for the Crisis Center, which works to end domestic violence through advocacy, education, and prevention.
  • Inspired by her own love of music and struggles with mental health, Madeline Farr from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, worked to install a piece of outdoor musical equipment called a “metallophone” on the playground of a low-resource elementary school. She also provided the school with lesson plans for how to use the instrument and educated her community about the importance of alternate recess activities for anxious young people.
  • Brenna Giblin of Westminster, Jefferson County Open School, worked to increase awareness for Turner Syndrome and help girls who are diagnosed with it. TS is a chromosomal disorder that affects 25-50 out of every 100,000 live baby girl births. Brenna created a video of girls with TS sharing their stories, experiences, and advice for others.
  • Rose Goodmanfrom Boulder, Boulder High School, created a lesson plan, which meets common-core standards, to educate second grade students about the declining bee population and how they can help bees.
  • Elizabeth Hoelscherfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, partnered with Avanti House, which houses teenage survivors of sex trafficking, to build a new library for the home and create welcome baskets for the girls.
  • Ashlin Hultfrom Niwot, Niwot High School, created a series of materials for middle-school girls to encourage healthy body image and increase self-esteem.
  • Zoi Johnsfrom Golden, Lakewood High School, coordinated the installation of three 10,000-liter water filtration tanks in a school in rural Uganda and educated students in Uganda and in Colorado about the importance of clean water.
  • Emma Kerr from Monument, Palmer Ridge High School, built a bookshelf and reading center at a local elementary school. With the help of administrators and teachers, she also started a fun and competitive read-a-thon program in which more than 300 students participated.
  • Emelie Knitz from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon Campus High School, created a cookbook for FoCo Café in Fort Collins to educate people about what community cafés are, how they help the public, and where people can find other community cafés.
  • Makayla Kocherfrom Monument, Colorado Springs Christian School, created an art program for nursing home residents.
  • Kayleigh Limbachfrom Niwot, Niwot High School, wrote a guidebook for incoming International Baccalaureate students to help them weigh their options for their academic future.
  • Ty’esha Lockyer from Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs Christian School, worked to encourage more people to volunteer for Special Olympics. She created a brochure and posters that went to more than 100 volunteer and civic organizations across the county.
  • Justine Monsell from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, partnered with American Legion Post 82 and the Elizabeth Cemetery to provide emblem markers and flags for the more than 150 veterans who are laid to rest in the cemetery.
  • Alexis Montaguefrom Castle Rock, Castle View High School, hosted a panel discussion so girls could learn more about career opportunities in STEM.
  • Riley Morgenthaler from Morrison, Conifer High School, created Creativity Tool Tubs to help close the gap that students living in low-resource areas face when participating in the STEM-based activity, Destination Imagination.
  • Sarah Nessfrom Centennial, Eaglecrest High School, hosted nearly two dozen after-school art therapy sessions to help kids at her school relieve and manage stress.
  • Gwyneth Ormesfrom Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, organized a series of after-school workshops to teach elementary school girls Processing (a basic programming language), along with the foundational concepts of computer science.
  • Emma Parkhurstfrom Centennial, Littleton High School, revitalized The Lions Cupboard, a local clothing closet, to make the space more accessible for families in need.
  • Jaden Scott from Fort Collins, Fort Collins High School, partnered with BASE Camp, an after school enrichment program, to offer dance classes as an extracurricular activity. Throughout her project, she taught more than 230 children dance at elementary schools throughout the Fort Collins area.
  • Abagail Sickingerfrom Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to help high school students get a job. Topics included: resume writing, what to wear, conducting yourself during an interview, and how to answer interview questions.
  • Katrina Stroudfrom Boulder, Niwot High School, created an activity booklet for The Butterfly Pavilion to teach children about Monarch butterflies and bumble bees.
  • Grayson Thomasfrom Lyons, Lyons High School, designed a mural of diverse and significant members of the STEM community for Lyons Middle/Senior High School.
  • Lillian Tobias from Breckenridge, Summit High School, partnered with the Colorado Haiti Project and traveled to Haiti to set up an entrepreneurship program at St. Paul’s school in the rural coastal town of Petit Trou de Nippes.
  • Marieke van Ervenfrom Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the elections department into high school government classes.
  • Melissa Wilsonfrom Castle Rock, Castle View High School, developed several materials to educate people who can hear about how to interact with those who are deaf.
  • Inspired by her mother’s battle with cancer, Susan Wilsonfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, created a media center for cancer patients undergoing treatment at Parker Adventist Hospital.
  • Mihaela Zaharescu from Broomfield, Prospect Ridge Academy, worked with her school’s National Honor Society chapter to create dental care packets for children in need. She also organized a drive to collect toothbrushes, toothpaste, floss, and mouthwash to go into the packets.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Colorado lawmakers honor Girl Scouts

On Monday, April 10, 2017, Colorado State Representatives broke from traditional business to honor 28 Girl Scouts from across the state who earned the Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts. More than half of this year’s honorees were at this recognition, which took place shortly after the session opened at 10 a.m.  As Girl Scout Gold Award recipients, these girls’ accomplishments reflect extraordinary leadership and citizenship skills that mark them as valuable contributors to their communities and world.

In addition to honoring these Girl Scouts and their extraordinary Gold Award projects that benefited communities across the world, Girl Scouts of Colorado introduced the winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. Emma Albertoni, from Arvada, wrote a financial literacy curriculum that was implemented in her school and considered by the Jefferson County School Board. The Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize was made possible through a generous gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment by Girl Scouts of Colorado President & CEO Stephanie A. Foote. “Emma’s project is an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. I am proud to present this prize to her and recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

Emma was honored along with two other Gold Award recipients, who the selection committee for the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize determined were deserving of Honorable Mention. They are Sydney Marchando and Angela Smith. Sydney, from Highlands Ranch, organized a 5K run and one-mile walk to raise awareness for Fresh Harvest Food Bank. Angela, from Colorado Springs, partnered with The Catamount Institute to implement an educational program to teach children about bees and their importance as a cornerstone species.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Foote. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance and leadership are making the world a better place.”

The Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

The following Colorado Girl Scouts are among the 28 statewide who will be receiving the prestigious Gold Award for the 2016-17 Girl Scout awards year:

  • Emma Albertoni from Arvada, Ralston Valley High School, took action after noticing that many of her peers lacked financial literacy. She wrote a curriculum that will be implemented in her school and proposed to the Jefferson County School Board to add a required Financial Literacy class.
  • Megan Beaudoin from Monument, St. Mary’s High School, created a 10-minute video for middle school students to help ease the transition to high school. Topics covered included: academics, social interactions, and self-esteem.
  • Megan Burnett from Colorado Springs, James Irwin Charter High School,worked with community leaders and businesses to build a softball field at the school. The project would have cost the school $25,000.
  • Kelsey Collins from Aurora, Grandview High School, created a curriculum to teach preschool and elementary school children about park safety and Colorado history.
  • Emma Curran from Colorado Springs, The Classical Academy, created “the Girl’s Life of Colorado” online magazine, or e-zine, as a source of positive and encouraging media for middle and high school students.
  • Taryn Eveland of Longmont, Longmont High School, built a sensory trail on the property of Front Range Hippotherapy, a nonprofit therapy center which uses the movements of a horse to address various social, behavioral, and cognitive disabilities.  The sensory trail includes a winding trail through the upper pasture with three permanent stations, each highlighting a different sense, including a mailbox, textile pole, and chimes.
  • Victoria Fedorco of Aurora, Eaglecrest High School, manufactured and provided raised pet beds to help senior pets be more comfortable as they await adoption in shelters.
  • Carissa Flores from Westminster, Broomfield High School, shared her knowledge and passion for Taekwondo by creating, coordinating, and leading self-defense seminars for children, teens, and adults. She also started the Women’s Self Defense Club at her school.
  • Kelsey Harry from Littleton, Heritage High School, created a new high school club, Operation Eagle, to address the issue of the U.S. military’s need of supplies that give them some comfort while away from home and also address the lack of military knowledge in our community.
  • Rebecca Hefty from Castle Rock, Castle View High School, improved a local dog park by installing a 10’x 16′ Trex pergola to provide shade and two picnic benches, giving visitors a place to sit.
  • Baily Holsinger from Larkspur, Castle View High School, worked with volunteers to crochet beanies for newborn babies at Denver Health Medical Center and Baby Haven in Fort Collins. She also held classes to teach volunteers of all ages how to make the beanies and why they are important.
  • Lindsay Iannone from Castle Rock, Castle View High School, improved the library at Faith Lutheran Church by removing unwanted books and adding new materials, including a computer.
  • Rebecca Kopacz of Colorado Springs, Palmer Ridge High School, hosted a weekly workshop for six weeks for 5th and 6th grade girls. She worked to prevent low self-esteem and teach girls they can be accepted for who they are.
  • Sydney Marchando from Highlands Ranch, Rock Canyon High School, planned and hosted the Miles for Meals 5K run and one-mile walk to raise awareness and collect donations for Fresh Harvest Food Bank.
  • Molly McPherson from Boulder, Fairview High School, promoted the use of reusable water bottles, as well as educated the public about the harmful effects of bottled water.
  • Julie Monington from Aurora, Grandview High School, created a butterfly garden at a horse sanctuary to educate others on the importance of protecting the Monarch Butterfly population.
  • Clementine Morisette from Fort Collins, Poudre High School, worked with community members and visitors at FoCo Cafe to create a visual representation about how food and culture connects us.
  • Kathleen Otto from Fort Collins, Fossil Ridge High School, worked to increase awareness for dyslexia by hosting a viewing of “The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia” and leading a panel discussion afterwards. Additionally, she installed a little free library in her community.
  • Emma Pond from Morrison, Conifer High School, worked to make hospital visits easier by providing patients and their families care packages with a few comforts from home and activities to help occupy their time at the hospital.
  • Daniell Plomodon from Erie, Niwot High School, organized several “Disability for a Day” presentations to educate others about living with a disability. Activities included: trying to button a shirt while wearing mittens, playing patty cake while wearing Vaseline covered glasses, and using person first language.
  • Anastasia Rosen from Fort Collins, Rocky Mountain High School, created a workshop to educate others about human trafficking, tactics recruiters use, and how to prevent it.
  • Angela Smith from Colorado Springs, William J. Palmer High School, implemented an educational program about bees and installed a new beehive at a local environmental center, The Catamount Institute.
  • Juliet Spitz from Boulder, Boulder High School, recently switched to a vegan diet and wanted to educate young adults about it. She created a lesson to inform them of the conditions of animals in factory farms, entertainment industries, and testing laboratories.
  • Allyson Story from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, led a team of volunteers to make more than 200 pillowcase dresses for young girls and taught sewing classes for women in Juarez, Mexico.
  • Jordan Wilson from Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, created a website and print resources to teach senior citizens about technology in a safe, easy, fun, and cost-efficient manner.
  • Debra Zerr from Arvada addressed the problem of the lack of connection between the military and public. Through a series of events, she educated others about the importance of the military and the men and women who serve.

Day at the Colorado Capitol for Cadette Girl Scouts

Cadette Girl Scouts visited the Colorado state capitol on Friday, June 10, 2016. Girls were given a tour of the building; participated in a mock election where they voted on an image for a tourism brochure (an image of Long’s Peak won); and visited with Representative Faith Winter to learn about how bills are passed. What an amazing opportunity for these older Girl Scouts!

 

 

 

 

A wild ride at the State Capitol

Submitted by Alessandra Smith

Colorado Springs

Pikes Peak

On Monday, May 2nd, Alessandra attended the Girl Scouts of Colorado Gold Award Day at the Capitol as a 2016 Gold Award recipient. The Kay Rugeley Shaw Gold Travelship helped to support her trip from Colorado Springs to Denver for this exciting and exclusive event!

Read more about Alessandra’s experience below:

Never did I think I’d be lucky enough to sit in on a session in the House of Representatives. To me, the government is a strange entity that is best left alone. Little did I know that it really is made up of the people.

I came into this situation thinking, “A day at the Capitol? Sounds sweet. I’m in.” And that was really all there was to it. I just love doing things I’ve never done before. I wasn’t truly aware of the prestige of this event, nor just how awesome it was going to be. The fantabulous day began with breakfast at The University Club (if you’re like me and you love buildings/establishments with visible history, this place is the bomb). As soon as I walked in, I could sense I was in a room of special girls. They were all high-achievers, movers and shakers, and yet they didn’t act like any of it had gone to their heads. These were truly superb individuals that I know I’m going to see in the news one day. It felt very humbling, and at the same time, invigorating to be surrounded by these people. It’s very refreshing to be with people who want to do great things outside of school. When I’m with those people, I feel like we’re part of the real world: A place where people make a difference in ways that are important to them. It’s a great change of pace from the soul-sucking image we youth tend to have of society.

After breakfast came the fun part. All of the Gold Award recipients got to tour the state Capitol building. I just adore the state Capitol. First of all, the dome is plated with gold. That is really cool. It just screams “Look at me! Cool things happen in here!” The structure is massive and magnificent. It is adorned with Corinthian pillars, and the stone inside is native Colorado red granite. We visited the Old Supreme Court Chambers, the attic, the dome, and even the House of Representatives!

Best part? The Girl Scout Gold Recipients were introduced to the representatives. Thanks to Representative Court, we Girl Scouts were able to understand what on earth was going on. She was good at putting legal jargon in layman’s terms. At the end of the day, it had finally hit me that I had watched our government in action. A government that a lot of Gold Recipients will probably go on to influence. I pondered these thoughts on the drive home while eating chocolate. Maybe I’ll go on to write a bill.

I never would have had this opportunity had I not earned my Gold Award. I thank my lucky stars to have had the support I have in this endeavor. I pray that lots of girls will get to do the things I did. It’s a wild ride, but it’s full of adventure.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

My Gold experience at the Colorado State Capitol

Submitted by Maniyah Hart

Colorado Springs

Pikes Peak

On Monday, May 2nd, Maniyah attended the Girl Scouts of Colorado Gold Award Day at the Capitol as a 2016 Gold Award recipient. The Kay Rugeley Shaw Gold Travelship helped to support her trip from Colorado Springs to Denver for this exciting and exclusive event!

Read more about Maniyah’s experience below.

I felt it was important to go to the Gold Award Day at the Capitol because it is a place of official business to help and run the community, just as Girl Scouts do. It was also important because going to this event was something very few people could actually do and it was quite the experience.

I felt connected when I was with the other Gold Award recipients. I was proud of all of us. I learned that there are more girls out there like me that are willing to put forth real effort to make the world a better place, I also learned that being a Gold Award recipient is a high honor.

I also learned a lot about the state Capitol and got to see how the Capitol and state government runs.

My advice to future recipients is to believe in yourself and to push yourself. Anything is possible if you really put your mind to it. It is well worth the effort especially if you start as early as possible.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Colorado House of Representatives honors Gold Award recipients

On Monday, May 2, Colorado’s House of Representatives broke from traditional business to honor 48 Girl Scouts from across the state who received the Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts.  Approximately half of this year’s honorees from along the Front Range were at this recognition, which will took place shortly after the session opened at 10 a.m.  As Girl Scout Gold Award recipients, these girls’ accomplishments reflect extraordinary leadership and citizenship skills that mark them as valuable contributors to their communities and world.

In addition to honoring these Girl Scouts and their extraordinary Gold Award projects that benefited communities across the world, Girl Scouts of Colorado also introduced the 2016 winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. Inspired by her twin brother who has an Autism Spectrum Disorder, Sarah Greichen from Centennial, Front Range Christian School, started a new non-profit organization to encourage more schools to offer and have students participate in unified sports teams and clubs. The Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize was made possible through a generous gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment by Girl Scouts of Colorado President & CEO Stephanie A. Foote. “Sarah’s project is an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. I am proud to present this prize to her and recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

Sarah was honored along with four other Gold Award recipients, who the selection committee for the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize determined were deserving of Honorable Mention. They are: Belle BashawKellyn DasslerCourtney Howell, and Cassidy Klein. Belle from Parker, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to teach elementary school students about the importance of bees, which bees they might see, and how they can help the bee population thrive. Kellyn from Parker, Chapparal High School, increased students’ respect for teachers and educators. She also worked to encourage teachers throughout the year and made working conditions better for staff by taking items off their “to-do” lists. Courtney from Niwot, Silver Creek High School, organized a science, math, and engineering exploration day for middle and elementary school students to show them that science can be fun. Cassidy from Highlands Ranch, ThunderRidge High School, collected more than 2,900 children’s books, which she used to create a library for Joshua Station, a transitional housing facility for families.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance and leadership is making the world a better place.”

This year Girl Scouts across the country are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts’ highest award. The Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Save the Date – 2016 Highest Awards Celebrations

The new year is right around the corner, so mark your calendars for the spring 2016 Highest Awards Celebrations!

These celebrations are an opportunity to recognize the amazing girls who have earned their Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award. In 2016, we will also be celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Gold Award in each region.

All troops and/or girls who have earned their Bronze, Silver, or Gold will receive an invitation to the celebrations via email in the spring and an online RSVP form will be made available.

Gold Award recipients across the state will also be recognized at the “Day at the Capitol” on Monday, May 2nd. Each Gold Award recipient is invited to participate in her regional celebration as well as the “Day at the Capitol”.

Please note that celebrations in Pueblo and the Western Slope will be announced in early 2016.