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Volunteer Spotlight: Jill Hoilman

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jill Hoilman from the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jill to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

In 2000, my daughter became a Daisy. And as so many other moms before me, I was introduced to the Girl Scout organization. The following year the troop needed an assistant leader, so I joined at the Brownie level to help the troop out. In 2002, the main troop leader moved away and I was asked by the other parents to take the troop on. Wanting to give careful thought to the commitment and make sure the organization would be compatible with my Christian beliefs, I researched Girl Scouts of the USA. That year was the 90th anniversary and a new theme had just been released. It was “Girl Scouts, For Every Girl, Everywhere.” That really spoke to me. I loved the idea of a club that accepted every girl. As a public school teacher, I saw the value in bringing girls together outside of school work to camp, sing, do crafts, and develop leadership skills. As a parent, I welcomed the opportunity for my daughter to get to know girls from all walks of life and travel to meet girls in other countries. And now, 20 years later, I am still involved in providing the program to every girl, everywhere.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

My favorite role is that of troop leader. I have had 11 troops over the years and each of the girls has a place in my heart. I still hear from many of them. As an avid camper I have enjoyed roles of unit camp director, day camp organizer, and volunteer staff at council camps. In my unit, I have served as the treasurer, recruiter, large events coordinator, service unit manager, and currently, program director for 6th – 12th grade troops. At the state level, I was a charter member of the MCC. I served nine years as a national representative, attending GSUSA conventions in Georgia, Indiana, and Texas. I supervised the Colorado Girl Delegates at two of those conventions which allowed me to work with girls from all around the state and the nation.

One can hardly be in Girl Scouts for 20 years without being involved in the Cookie Program. I have held volunteer positions at the troop, unit, area, and state level. Many of the positions I held as a cookie team member no longer exist. Did you know that originally we set around a table at council with slips of paper from troops listing their booth sale request?  Then, we manually assigned the sales. I remember the first computer program that was written in-house at the council level to do this function. It was so exciting to leave the council office late that night  when it was completed, drive home, turn on our single home computer, and receive the test email to see if it was going to work! How far we have come to our fabulous programs of today. The Girl Scout organization continues to evolve with the times.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have been learning right along with the girls over the years as we have gone on field trips to the Dumb Friends League, a sewage plant, the bank, NREL, the fire station, a dam, a female mechanic, a news/weather station, homeless shelter, the emissions station, the post office, the sheriffs station, and a hospital ER. It gives me great satisfaction that the girls are expanding their knowledge with each of these experiences. Each badge develops a unique skill set and encourages lifelong learning.

I have also learned from the girls! My high school troops keep me up to date with technology. I got my first smartphone only because the girls promised to help me learn to use it. That skill allows me to keep in contact with troops in a way email does not, especially the high school girls. Honestly, I balked a bit when COVID-19 caused our troops to move to Zoom meetings. I considered that it might be time to retire since I was going to have so many new things to learn in using the virtual format. But, then I thought of the 55 girls I am currently working with and wondered what all those girls would do during the long months of the pandemic. So, I plunged in and with the help of my high school girls and some other leaders, got a Zoom account, and learned how to use its programs. After some trial and error, we have developed a format of girls picking up a supply sack from a table in my driveway a few days before the meeting. Then, on meeting day we get together on Zoom and open up the bags. The girls enjoy having hands-on items to work on as we earn badges together virtually. The younger troops have baked, painted, worked in clay, and earned a cookie badge. 23 of the unit Seniors completed the Sow What? Journey (including the Take Action project of decorating and filling Thanksgiving dinner boxes for 31 families). And, many are finishing up the Games Visionary badge. Both Senior and Ambassador troops earned the new Democracy badge. One of my Ambassador troops had a blast with the Photography badge and another focused on College Knowledge. We have supplemented with online resources from Girl Scouts of Colorado and a few girls have attended badge seminars. While we are all anxious to see each other again, we are persevering at home, together.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

It’s important to me that the girls realize this is their club. They should set the mood and atmosphere, creating a safe, no judgement, place to meet and work together. Certainly, they need to be taught how to do this and it starts in Daisies. I begin by encouraging the girls to help each other. When one asks to have her orange pealed or juice box opened or craft assembled, I direct her to find a sister Girl Scout who has already managed to do it. So, we look around and see who is doing the job well. Then, we ask her to assist the girl who wants help. It is very affirming at six-years-old to be recognized as being good enough at something that an adult ask you to help another six-year-old. My job then as the adult is to make sure every girl is recognized and all play a part in the “helping.” As girls advance through the program, this skillset continues to develop through Take Action projects, leadership roles, PA Training, and Highest Awards, allowing girls to build confidence and character.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Gretchen Solidum

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Gretchen Solidum from Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Gretchen to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

As a kid, I was a Girl Scout from Brownie thru Junior years and really enjoyed learning new things and loved going off to summer camp. The summer I was in third grade, I was so determined to earn my badges at home and marked up my badge book to see what I could do on my own with my mom signing off.  By earning the cooking badge, I really started to learn how to cook and it sparked a passion for baking that has continued to this day. I became a Girl Scout volunteer my daughter’s second year as a Daisy, three years ago. Our troop first formed with kindergarten/first grade girls and I had just changed jobs from Castle Rock to Colorado Springs and started to feel like I had more time to be involved with the troop.  Our previous TCM had just moved away and I was curious about how the cookie season worked and how our Daisies could become more confident speaking to others, making eye contact, and achieving their goals as individuals as well as a troop. It has been phenomenal to watch the more outspoken girls help the shy ones and the excitement they get when they make that sale or hit their goals. I’ve seen these achievements translate outside of cookies to how they interact in a group.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I have been our troop’s TCM the past three years, a co-leader the past two years, and this year, my husband and I were also the westside Cookie Cupboard in Colorado Springs. I like numbers and seeing what we can do to increase our funds for the girls to go on new experiences and I enjoy helping others. Being a co-leader has been fun and I’m grateful for my other leader, Betsy Douglass, to share ideas to engage the girls and help them grow. The cupboard has been more fun than I realized with a unique opportunity to meet other leaders, hear their troop’s goals and past trips, and make connections for future planning and opportunities.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

To give the girls the encouragement and freedom to make decisions, make mistakes, and just have fun.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that they understand that we all have something to contribute, something to say, and that we all have value. Our troop is still young and we hope that they continue to support one another and they see the potential that each of them has to make change. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Elisabeth Fries

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Elisabeth Fries from the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Elisabeth to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a GirlScout volunteer?

I grew up with a single mom who worked fulltime, yet still made time to be my Girl Scout leader. Some of my favorite memories growing up were Girl Scout-related activities, such as going to camp, making crafts, and a song she wrote for us entitled “The Girl Scout Shuffle.” Now, that I have a daughter, I want to offer her the same experiences (and memories) my mom gave me. It seems to be working because Girl Scouts is by far my daughter’s favorite extracurricular activity, and she tells everyone she meets that I’m her leader! 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started the troop and lead it with another amazing woman, Miss Stacie. This year, I was also the fall product program manager and troop cookie manager.

What have you learned as a GirlScout volunteer?

I have learned that it’s the greatest volunteer position in the world! My Daisies have little hearts of gold and simply want to spread sunshine everywhere they go. They have reminded me of how beautiful this world is even in a time of uncertainty and fear.

What do you hope girlshave learned from you?

To be a sister to every Girl Scout! I want them to know they can do anything they put their minds to and Girl Scouts will always be a “safe space” for them.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Lina Zimmer

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Lina Zimmer in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Lina to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a volunteer originally to be supportive of my daughter and to be able to attend meetings and events. As time went on, I realized that there was a real need for someone to be there for the girls in a leadership role.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

After my initial volunteer role, I decided to start my own troop due to the need in my area. In addition to currently managing two troops, I have filled the roles of a troop fall product program manager, service unit fall product program manager, troop cookie manager, and am a current member of the Pike’s Peak Region Cookie Committee. I’ve worked in the community to secure agreements with local businesses for council cookie sites, as well as locations for our troop’s My Sales. I enjoy building strong relationships in our community. 
What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?
I’ve learned that Girl Scouts truly is a great program for young ladies to learn and grow into future leaders in a safe and supportive environment. I’ve also realized a tremendous amount of personal growth through my time with Girl Scouts.
What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned, and continue to learn, that putting in the work will always yield positive results. I also hope that they gain the confidence to know, in their hearts, that they can accomplish anything they set their mind to and that is all of our responsibility to make the world a better place.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Taylor Lockwood

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Taylor Lockwood from Windsor in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is a member of the Cookie Committee,  cookie delivery site volunteer, and Cookie Cupboard clerk. He works six days a week and then on his days off and at night, he helps his mother-in-law at the Loveland Cookie Cupboard.  He is a proud Girl Scout volunteer and so incredibly helpful, but most importantly, Taylor is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Taylor to answer a few quick questions about his volunteer experience. We hope you find Taylor as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer because I was already helping in various ways as a non-volunteer with the organization. By becoming a volunteer, it allowed me to help out in other capacities that I otherwise wouldn’t have been able to do. Becoming a volunteer was a different area that I was able to serve my community and share my knowledge and skillset with.  

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

My volunteer roles currently have been limited, but I am looking forward to being able to expand on those. My main role is to serve as a volunteer for the Windsor-area service unit. When I’m not helping out on the service unit level, I am working very tirelessly during the Cookie Program either helping run the Loveland Cupboard or being a secret booth shopper. Both of these roles allow me to be very active and engaged, not only with other volunteers and girls, but supporting our community relationships.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Being a Girl Scout volunteer has taught me many things in a short time. I have learned that Girl Scouts is more than selling cookies and is a pathway for girls to be who they want to be and have a voice that can be heard. I have also learned that there is more to Girl Scout Cookies than being sold in front of a store and that it takes a large team effort to actually distribute cookies, not only across the region, but also to our local area troops.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I am hoping that I have been able to share and influence some valuable life skills to the girls that I have had the pleasure of volunteering with. Some of those valuable skills came from working with the Cookie Captains at the cupboard and teaching those girls how to operate and move cookies with a pallet jack, properly stacking the pallets of cookies. I helped the girls work to improve their customer service skills while being a secret shopper for booths. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Ways to use your Cookie Credits

Our Girl Scouts and volunteers made the 2021 Girl Scout Cookie Program an AMAZING success, rising to every challenge with energy, creativity, and true Girl Scout spirit! It’s time to celebrate your perseverance and hard work.

One way to do that is to plan to make the most of the Cookie Credits girls earned by participating in the Girl Scout Cookie Program or Fall Product Program.

There are so many exciting ways to use Cookie Credits, including:

  • Girls can use the Cookie Credit reimbursement form to get reimbursed for their Girl Scout membership fee. Complete the form on the GSCO website. (See link below.)
  • Girl Scouts of Colorado shop – in-person or via phone order – Cookie Credits cannot be processed for online store purchases.
  • GSCO troop or service unit trip, event, or activity with a per girl fee
  • GSCO sponsored or hosted event or activity
  • EF Tours
  • Girl Scout destinations
  • Highest Awards materials and fees
  • Volunteer-run day camps or events with a per girl cost
  • GSCO summer camp* (Cookie Credits can be held at GSCO and applied to camp registration – OR – Cookie Credits are mailed directly to girls.)

*Important Note: In accordance with IRS guidelines, you cannot use Cookie Credits to attend Girl Scout camps in other states/councils.

Cookie Credits will be mailed to directly to girls in May, unless the girl requested that they be held at council to pay for camp. Troops and girls can be reimbursed for these activities using the Cookie Credit Reimbursement Form. For GSCO camp, redeem the credits use the Credit Redemption Form for Camp. 

Cookie Credits may NOT be used to pay fees to outside vendors for individual girls, purchase items not in the Girl Scouts of Colorado shop, or pay for travel expenses for adults or those not related to Girl Scouts of Colorado.

Cookie Credits may only be used by GSCO girl members and an active membership is required.  For questions about what Cookie Credits can be used for, please contact: financial.followup@gscolorado.org

Cookie Credits do not have a cash value. Cookie Credits expire 10 years from date of issue. Cookie Credits will not be re-issued if lost.

Cookie Pro Tip: Take a photo of the Cookie Credits card and save the photo as a backup file in case the card gets lost.

Cookie Credit FAQs
I was previously told that I could not use Cookie Credits to renew membership, so why is GSCO making this change now?
In 2016 Girl Scouts of Colorado stopped allowing Cookie Credits to renew girl membership, however new guidance has come out from Girl Scouts of the USA and now Cookie Credits may be used to pay for girl membership; they may not be used to pay for adult membership.

Can troops use Cookie Credits to reimburse adults?
No. For money earning/troop budgeting questions, refer to Volunteer Essentials. You can also email financial.followup@gscolorado.org

Can Juliettes use Cookie Credits to reimburse adults?
No.

Can I use Cookie Credits to attend a Girl Scouts of Colorado-sponsored or hosted event/activity?
Yes, as long as there is a per girl cost.

Can I use Cookie Credits to host an event for Girl Scouts?
No. For money earning/troop budgeting questions, refer to Volunteer Essentials. You can also email financial.followup@gscolorado.org

How can I find out how much I have in Cookie Credits?
You can verify the amount remaining on your cookie card by going to the web address or calling the number on the back of the card.

Can troops pool their Cookie Credits together to pursue a troop activity?
Yes, with the full consent of the girls in the troop, a troop may pool their credits for reimbursement for a Girl Scout-related cost that complies with the guidelines above.

Smart Cookie: March 15, 2021

We’re in the home stretch and wrapping up the 2021 Cookie Program. It’s been a great season! Thank you for the hard work, long hours, and endless enthusiasm you bring to supporting Girl Scouts during the Cookie Program and throughout the year.

Managing Digital Cookie Options

Parents/caregivers can turn off varieties of cookies that they don’t have on-hand and you can switch between girl delivery or shipped/donated. Cookie volunteers managing the troop link “faux girl” site can do the same. Go to the Digital Cookie Parent Inventory Tab tip sheet for more information.

Activated troop links are also still included in the Find Cookies search engine. Troop links default to shipped/donated, and that option will remain open through the end of the program on March 21.

eBudde Closeout

Troops will be locked out of eBudde at 11:59 p.m. on Monday, March 22. *

TCMs – Before the deadline:

  • Check that all cupboard orders are listed as complete, not pending.
  • Update or clear inventory listed in the Cookie Exchange.
  • If your troop accepted cookies through a troop-to-troop transfer, be sure to add that transaction.
  • Allocate all cookie sales to the girls in your troop – enter and verify all transactions.
  • Submit the final reward order.
  • Review eBudde closeout with service unit cookie manager.

*You will still be able to see everything in eBudde after the lock-out, such as sales report and girl reward selections. It’s a good idea to print the sales report and reward choices for your records. You can continue to add cookie payments in eBudde, but you can’t change cookie allocations.

Digital Cookie Troop Link

This year, there is the troop link that must also total zero at the end of the program. When the program closes, there cannot be any sales on the troop “faux girl” or troop URL. Cookies sold through the troop URL (shipped, donated, and cookie booth sales) have to be allocated to selling girls in the troop.

If you have any questions about closeout, contact the service unit cookie manager in your area.

Girl Reward Section

  • Look at girl rewards on the back of the order card or click here.
  • Have your Girl Scout complete a girl reward selection sheet before March 22, and give it to the troop cookie manager (TCM).

Reward orders are due in eBudde by 8 p.m., March 22. If you have girls who do not make reward selections by the deadline, choose the item instead of Cookie Credits. If later the girl wants the Cookie Credits instead, it’s easier for GSCO to make the change. Don’t forget, girls have the option of holding Cookie Credits at council to be applied to summer camp fees.

Money Problem Reports

Money Problem Reports are due by 8 p.m., March 26. To file, you’ll need the total amount of uncollected debt, contact information for the person responsible for the debt, and a description of the situation and receipts or other supporting documentation.

To access the form, click here.

Hometown Hero Cookies

If you need additional Hometown Hero cookies, first check with other troops in your area to see if they have inventory to transfer. The last day to pick up Hometown Hero cookies from cupboards is March 24.

Don’t forget to share photos of your Hometown Hero deliveries with us! We love seeing your girls in action, sharing their hard work, and putting smiles on their Hometown Heroes’ faces. If you would like to invite the media to witness you deliver cookies to your Hometown Hero, please contact Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org .

Special Patches- Extended Deadlines

Pandemic Perseverance patch. Complete this online form no later than Tuesday, March 23, 2021. Be sure to include your goals, Hometown Hero, and troop number.

Girls can earn a custom “Porch Pixie” patch when they make their first contactless delivery to a customer! Take a photo of yourself dropping off cookies then complete this online form no later than Tuesday, March 23, 2021. Be sure to include your goals, Hometown Hero, and troop number.

These patches are only available to Colorado Girl Scouts.

Learn More

Revised Cookie Program Dates

March 21-24 – Cookie Program closeout

  • March 22 – Deadline to select and submit ALL girl rewards in eBudde.
  • March 22 – Troops will be locked out of eBudde at 11:59 p.m. TCMs can still see all information in eBudde but will not be able to change any information after the deadline.
  • Make sure all cookies are allocated to girls, including all cookie sales on the troop link, and that all girl rewards are selected. Print a copy of the sales report and girl reward selections.
  • March 24 – Final SU submissions on ALL girl rewards in eBudde.
  • March 24 – Last day to pick up Hometown Hero (HTH) cookies from a cupboard.
  • March 26 – Deadline to submit a Money Problem Report. Form closes at 8 p.m.
  • March 26 – Deadline to submit form to redeem golden, silver, and bronze tickets found at cupboards.
  • March 31 – ACH debit occurs for total amount owed to council.
  • First week of May – Cookie Credits mailed to girls.
  • May – Rewards shipped to SUCM.

Blackout dates concerning troop/group money-earning activities outside of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, will remain the same as originally stated (Jan. 31-March 17).

Any troop/group money earning activities planned for after March 17 will not be in conflict.

Smart Cookie: March 8, 2021

Cookie Cupboards- Golden, Silver, and Bronze Tickets

The first golden ticket was found in a case of Thin Mints at the Mesa County Cookie Cupboard over the weekend!

Since March 1, eight silver and 13 bronze tickets have also been found.

Troops who find tickets in cases of cookies they pick up at select cupboards, will receive additional proceeds. Juliettes will receive Cookie Credits.

  • Golden Tickets – $100 troop proceeds
  • Silver Tickets – $50 troop proceeds
  • Bronze Tickets – $25 troop proceeds

Read more about the golden, silver, and bronze tickets on the GSCO Blog.

Inventory Management

New! Mapped Digital Cookie troop links! To help cookie customers find troops selling cookies GSCO has published a map with active troop links on the GSCO Find Cookies Page! Customers can buy directly through Digital Cookie troop links and find booths in the Cookie Finder.

Managing Digital Cookie Options

Parents/caregivers can turn off varieties of cookies that they don’t have on-hand and you can switch between girl delivery or shipped/donated. Cookie volunteers managing the troop link “faux girl” site can do the same. Go to the Digital Cookie Parent Inventory Tab tip sheet for more information.

Activated troop links are also still included in the Find Cookies search engine. Troop links default to shipped/donated, and that option will remain open through the end of the program on March 21.

Allocate Digital Cookies Troop Link Sales in eBudde

If you haven’t started already, now is the time for TCMs to allocate cookies to girls and continue to do so until the end of the program.

This year, there is the troop link that must also total zero at the end of the program. When the program closes, there cannot be any sales on the troop “faux girl” or troop URL. Cookies sold through the troop URL (shipped, donated, and cookie booth sales) have to be allocated to selling girls in the troop.

Cookie Box Innovation Challenge

Making the world a better place starts with innovation. Together,  Arrow Electronics and Girl Scouts of Colorado are challenging Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors to design a prototype that addresses a problem in our community and beyond by using Girl Scout Cookie boxes and other recycled materials for the Cookie Box Innovation Challenge.

  • Connect with experts in innovation with  Arrow Electronics.
  • Let your imagination run wild with possibilities.
  • Put your cookie boxes to good use.
  • Earn your Cookie Box Innovation Challenge patch!
  • Compete to win exciting prizes.

Watch for a virtual kickoff in May.  Final designs will be submitted and judged at an  Arrow Innovation Fair in October. Fill out the online interest form and details about the challenge will be sent to you directly as they are announced.

Interest Form

Specialty Patches- Extended Deadlines

Colorado Girl Scouts can earn a FREE Pandemic Perseverance patch. Take a photo showcasing how you’re persevering to reach your cookie goal. This can be a photo of you working on your Digital Cookie website, hosting a virtual cookie booth, dropping off cookies on a friend or family member’s doorstep, etc. Complete this online form no later than Tuesday, March 23, 2021. Be sure to include your goals, Hometown Hero, and troop number.

To commemorate the introduction of the girl delivery option, girls will earn a custom “Porch Pixie” patch when they make their first contactless deliveryto a customer! Take a photo of yourself dropping off cookies on a friend or family member’s doorstep, etc., then complete this online form no later than Tuesday, March 23, 2021. Be sure to include your goals, Hometown Hero, and troop number.

These patches are only available to Colorado Girl Scouts.

Learn More

Revised Cookie Program Dates

March 21-24 – Cookie Program closeout

  • March 22 – Deadline to select and submit ALL girl rewards in eBudde.
  • March 22 – Final troop data due at 11:59 p.m. Allocate ALL cookies to girls in eBudde.
  • March 24 – Final SU submissions on ALL girl rewards in eBudde.
  • March 24 – Last day to pick up Hometown Hero (HTH) cookies from a cupboard.

March 26 – Deadline to submit a Money Problem Report. Form closes at 8 p.m.

March 26 – Deadline to submit form to redeem golden, silver, and bronze tickets found at cupboards.

March 31 – ACH debit occurs for total amount owed to council.

First week of May – Cookie Credits mailed to girls.

May – Rewards shipped to SUCM.

Blackout dates concerning troop/group money-earning activities outside of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, will remain the same as originally stated (Jan. 31-March 17).

Any troop/group money earning activities planned for after March 17 will not be in conflict.

Smart Cookie: March 1, 2021

The announcement that the cookie program will be extended through March 21 has been met with enthusiasm. Girl entrepreneurs and our supportive volunteers are continuing to rise above every challenge with innovative and creative solutions making this a great Girl Scout Cookie Program!

Hometown Hero Booth Focus

Generous Coloradans are happy to support your Hometown Hero, so be sure to ask customers to buy cookies to donate! Make a poster with images and facts about your Hometown Hero. When people walk by your booth ask, “Would you like to purchase Girl Scout Cookies for our Hometown Hero?” Tell them how many donated packages you want to collect, explain more about your HTH, and be ready to talk about why they matter to you! Hometown Heroes should be listed in eBudde and cookies should be delivered by the troop as soon as possible after the Cookie Program ends. Troops can pull additional cookies to fill Hometown Hero orders or use any remaining inventory at the end of the program for these donated.

Cookie Cupboard News

New Incentive for Troops and Juliettes – Select Cookie Cupboards around the state hid golden, silver, and bronze tickets in cases of cookies over the weekend. Three troops have already found winning tickets and there are plenty more!

Troops that find tickets in their cupboard orders will receive additional proceeds. Juliettes will receive Cookie Credits.

  • Golden Tickets– $100 troop proceeds
  • Silver Tickets– $50 troop proceeds
  • Bronze Tickets– $25 troop proceeds

To redeem a golden, silver, or bronze ticket, troop volunteers or Juliette caregivers need to:

  • Scan the QR code on the ticket.
  • Complete the form.
  • Upload a photo of themselves with the case of cookies and the winning ticket.

Friday, March 26 is the deadline to submit the form to redeem the winning tickets found at cupboards. Late submissions will NOT be accepted.

Cookie Cupboard Order 72 hour Hold Requirement Lifted

Many Cookie Cupboards across the state have agreed to stay open for two more weeks and Cookie Cupboards are no longer required to adhere to the 72-hour lead time. It’s the cupboard manager’s decision to have either no wait, a 24 hour wait, or continue with a 72 hour wait, depending on what works best for their workflow and availability.

  • Be sure to refer to each cupboard notes section in eBudde to see what their lead time requirements are and their cupboard hours of availability.
  • Cupboards will still require volunteers to choose a pick-up time. Doing so is the best way to manage the number of people picking up orders from a cupboard at a time and adhere to safety guidelines.
  • People picking up cookies from cupboards need an eBudde password.

Booth Updates and Inventory Management

Dates for My Sales booths have been extended in eBudde to March 21. Parents/caregivers should submit requests for My Sales booth site approvals though their troop cookie manager. Make sure that the location name and address is complete and correct. It makes it easier for customers to find!

Look for additional Council booth locations this week too!

Inventory Management

Digital Cookie – Parents/caregivers can turn off varieties of cookies that they don’t have on hand. Go to the Digital Cookie “Parent Inventory Tab” tip sheet for more information.

Allocate Cookies in eBudde – If you haven’t started already, now is the time for TCMs to allocate cookies to girls and continue to do so until the end of the program.

This year, there is the troop link that also has to be zero at the end of the program. When the program closes, there cannot be any sales on the troop “faux girl” or troop URL. Cookies sold through the troop URL (shipped and donated AND cookie booth sales) have to be allocated to selling girls in the troop.

  • “How-to” videos will post to the GSCO Facebook page/videos and YouTube channel by Friday, March 5. The demo videos will walk you through the steps on how to allocate all cookies.
  • TCMs can also check-in with their service unit cookie manager for support.

2021 Service Unit Incentive

Service units will receive an incentive of $.01 (penny) per package sold, if the number of packages sold in 2021 is 3% (or more) over the number of packages sold in 2020.

If the number of packages sold in 2021 is 6% more than the number of packages sold last year, service units will receive $.02 per package. Note: These incentives are not cumulative.

Service Units need to submit a current ACH form for the service unit bank account in order to receive the incentive deposit.

  • If you completed the ACH form with your Annual SU report in 2020, it covers you for the 2021 Cookie Program incentive.
  • If you don’t have a SU bank account, please set one up. Submit an ACH authorization before March 21.  Click here for ACH authorization link.

Reminders about Special Cookie Patches- Deadlines Extended

Colorado Girl Scouts can earn a FREE Pandemic Perseverance patch. Take a photo showcasing how you’re persevering to reach your cookie goal. This can be a photo of you working on your Digital Cookie website, hosting a virtual cookie booth, dropping off cookies on a friend or family member’s doorstep, etc. Complete this online form no later than Tuesday, March 23, 2021. Be sure to include your goals, Hometown Hero, and troop number.

To commemorate the introduction of the girl delivery option, girls will earn a custom “Porch Pixie” patch when they make their first contactless delivery to a customer!  Take a photo of yourself dropping off cookies on a friend or family member’s doorstep, etc., then complete this online form no later than Tuesday, March 23, 2021. Be sure to include your goals, Hometown Hero, and troop number.

These patches are only available to Colorado Girl Scouts.

Learn More

Revised Cookie Program Dates

March 7 – Grubhub booths end

March 21 – Cookie Program ends

March 21-24 – Cookie Program closeout

March 22 – Deadline to select and submit ALL girl rewards in eBudde.

March 22 – Final troop data due at 11:59 p.m. Allocate ALL cookies to girls in eBudde.

March 24 – Final SU submissions on ALL girl rewards in eBudde.

March 24 – Last day to pick up Hometown Hero (HTH) cookies from a cupboard.

March 26 – Deadline to submit a Money Problem Report. Form closes at 8 p.m.

March 26 – Deadline to submit form to redeem golden, silver, bronze tickets found at cupboards.

March 31 – ACH debit occurs for total amount owed to council.

First week of May – Cookie Credits mailed to girls.

May – Rewards shipped to SUCM.

Blackout dates concerning troop/group money-earning activities outside of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, will remain the same as originally stated (Jan. 31-March 17).

Any troop/group money earning activities planned for after March 17 will not be in conflict.

Revised Dates for the 2021 Girl Scout Cookie program

Girl Scouts of Colorado has extended the 2021 Girl Scout Cookie Program until March 21, and with that extension, other key dates and deadlines have shifted.

Revised Dates:

Starting February 26, Golden, silver, and bronze tickets to be found in cases of cookies at cupboards.

March 7 – Grubhub booths end

March 21 – Cookie Program ends

March 21-24 – Cookie Program closeout

March 22 – Select and submit ALL girl rewards in eBudde

March 22 – Final troop data due at 11:59 p.m. Allocate ALL cookies to girls in eBudde.

March 24 – Final SU submissions on ALL girl rewards in eBudde.

March 24 – Last day to pick up Hometown Hero (HTH) cookies from a cupboard.

March 26 – Deadline to submit a Money Problem Report. Form closes at 8 p.m.

March 26 – Deadline to submit form to redeem tickets found at cupboards.

March 31 – ACH debit occurs for total amount owed to council.

First week of May – Cookie Credits mailed to girls

May – Rewards shipped to SUCM

Blackout dates concerning troop/group money-earning activities outside of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, will remain the same as originally stated (Jan. 31-March 17).

Any troop/group money earning activities planned for after March 17 will not be in conflict.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.