Tag Archives: Colorado Springs

Gold Award Girl Scout: Ty’esha Lockyer, Colorado Springs, “Help Wanted: Special Olympics”

What did you do for your Gold Award Project?

My project provided a wide range of organizations and individuals an awareness of the need for volunteers with Special Olympics and the huge impact that can be made in the lives of persons with developmental disabilities. I designed a tri-fold brochure and poster explaining the volunteer opportunities available and contact information for the four Special Olympics Regions in Colorado. I distributed more than 300 brochures and 35 posters with a cover letter explaining this project and my own involvement as my sister’s unified partner in tennis. The distribution included mailing packets to Girl Scout Council Offices throughout Colorado, Boy Scout State office, 30 National Honor Society Chapters, Local and State Civic Groups, IB Programs, and all 50 State Special Olympics Offices. I presented in person my project to my school Student Ministries and National Honor Society chapter, local libraries, the local Boy Scout office and the Senior Center.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

After sharing opportunities to volunteer with my tennis teammates and coaches, three became unified partners in our local Special Olympics tennis program last season. Many others, including the three from last season, have expressed their interest in getting involved this year.  Based on my 33% success rate, the number of possible new volunteers through awareness provided by the brochures and posters is huge. Also, the interest from members in NHS chapter at my school to acquire the needed service hours gives me confidence that volunteer involvement throughout the State of Colorado will increase dramatically.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

For over 25 years, my family has been involved with Special Olympics and witnessed volunteers continuing to serve this community year after year.  Historically, volunteers soon discover that they receive much more than they give and become more involved as they see the many opportunities.

Since I have given permission for the reproduction of the brochures and posters when needed, the awareness will continue to be shared for many years to come.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I believe that many athletes with disabilities will benefit when awareness of volunteer opportunities is increased.  A letter was sent to all 50 Special Olympic State offices with a brochure, encouraging duplication of this project in their area.  I received a letter from the Tennessee office stating that they are hoping to use the information in their state and thanking me sharing my project with them.  Hopefully, many other states will do the same.  In addition, with the military presence in our community, movement and re-involvement could spread across the country as well as the world.

What did you learn about yourself?

The courage to present ideas to people I don’t know isn’t as hard as I thought, especially when presenting a worthwhile opportunity.  I began with the idea that I would promote volunteering in my own community, but as I began developing the project, with the encouragement of my mentor, I realized that I needed to think bigger, which I will definitely do in the future.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Besides having the honor of being one of the relatively small group of girls that achieve the Gold Award, I have the satisfaction of knowing I participated in and completed the Girl Scout experience.  Also, the time management I developed while juggling the many other activities I’m involved with at school and church will serve me well in college and my future career.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of you Girl Scout experience?

The Girl Scout program is designed to help girls develop and grow in abilities like leadership and friendships. The Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards promoted problem solving, serving others, and an awareness of community needs.  The sense of finishing well has definitely contributed to empowering me for the future challenges I will face. My involvement as my sister’s unified partner in Special Olympics tennis has shown me that when you give, you receive even more.  To know that I have made other’s aware of this opportunity has been very gratifying.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L.?

I definitely see myself as a go-getter.  Not only did I “go get” volunteers for our local tennis team “The Fireballs,”  I personally shared with many people my own experience as my sister’s tennis partner and by mailing more than 100 packets with cover letters explaining my experience and including brochures and posters to be used as they felt would reach the most people.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

WTD 2018: Troop 551’s creek cleanup

Submitted by Clair M.

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Saturday, March 17, 2018 was a beautiful day for Troop 40551’s World Think Day 2018 : Creek Cleanup.  Each year, World Thinking Day has a different theme that Girl Guides and Girl Scouts around the world can learn about and take action on. This year we focused on: MAKE AN IMPACT! by hosting a super fun global impact event to help the Sand Creek Watershed!

Our fabulous Girl Scouts got together to motivate one another to make a positive change in our community.  It was such a great day!! All ages were welcome.

Girl Scouts came for an interactive learning experience, and brought their friends and families to join in, as they rolled up their sleeves and worked together to take-action and clean-up a section of Sand Creek and the adjoining trail.  Girl Scout Daisies and Brownies along with other littler ones kept to cleaning nearest the trail.  Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors along with other volunteers ventured to the areas directly adjacent to the trail (without going into the water), picking up larger debris, depending on their comfort levels.  And most importantly, we did it all while trying to make it as fun as possible to collect trash. We just might have been part of Girl Scouts first Super Hero TRASH MOB!

Lowes donated hauling carts and trash bags. The Neighborhood Services Code Enforcement Unit donated a 30-yard dumpster.
Onsite we had representatives/booths from WAGGS, Rocky Mountain Field Institute, Trails Open Space Coalition and CSP Water Resources Engineering Division.

These people took the time to interact with Girl Scouts/volunteers to educate attendees in how to be a part of the solution, instead of part of the problem.  And some were even interested in becoming part of the cities Adopt-A-Waterway Program.  Here are the estimated results of the cleanup:

– Number of volunteers: 175
– Hours of volunteerism: 4 hours window equates to 612 hours of labor
– Value of volunteer hours: $14,785.75
– 23 cubic yards of trash were collected
– Pounds/Tons of litter Removed: 3,800 pounds/ 1.9 tons

Seeing the excitement when shown how to make an impact, helped make our WTD Creek Cleanup a great experience!  Thank you to all the Girl Scouts, their friend and families, for working so hard and to make our community a better place.

We would love to share our experiences with you at our next Creek Cleanup Event -especially with Earth Day coming soon.

Let’s get outdoors, get active, and create some good for our community because our watersheds need helping hands! Troop 40551, imagines every time we do a creek cleanup, we should pull out our super hero costumes and have fun!! #GirlScoutsareSuperHeroes

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Emelie Knitz, Colorado Springs, “FoCo Cafe Cookbook”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a cookbook for FoCo Cafe in Fort Collins to help educate people about community cafes and how they positively impact their community. Not only did I include information and recipes from FoCo Cafe, but I also included a recipe and information from 13 other community cafes around the United States. I also did a presentation at a club at my school to further educate people in my community about community cafes.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

One way I measured impact was by handing out surveys to the people I presented to. Before the presentation, they answered the questions, “Do you know what a community cafe is?” and “Do you know why community cafes are important?” on the survey. Most people did not know the answers to these questions. However, the majority of people were able to answer both of the questions after the presentation, showing improvement and that my goal of educating people about community cafes was reached.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I have given the template for FoCo Cafe’s cookbook to FoCo Cafe so they can continue to print the cookbooks and change information if needed. I have also given the template of the cookbook to the 13 other community cafes so that they can print the cookbooks for their cafes as well.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

In the cookbook, I have included a recipe, photo, and information from 13 other community cafes in the USA. The 13 cafes are Oakwood Soul Cafe (NY), Tulsa’s Table (OK), Take Root (MO), One Bistro (OH), SAME Cafe (CO), CAFE 180 (CO), Mustard Seed Cafe (TX), Stone Soup Cafe (MA), One Acre Cafe (TN), Grace Cafe (KY), Knead Community Cafe (PA), Fair Trade Cafe (AZ), and Table Grace Cafe (NE). I sent the cookbook template to the cafes as well so that they will be able to print them for their own cafe.

What did you learn about yourself?

I definitely learned from my poor time management skills in the duration of this project and improved my organization skills because I had to manage all of the information and recipes from multiple cafes. One thing I really learned about myself during this project was how I handled panic. Once the community cafe I was originally working with closed, I started to panic because I thought that I would have to create a whole new project, but I just had to breathe and reflect upon what I had done so far in order to move forward.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This project will impact me in the future because of the confidence I have gained in myself as a person and my abilities as a leader. I now know that I can persevere through a big project that I planned myself, and I believe I will be more confident in leading other people and projects, whether they are big or small. In this project, I also learned how important it is to have the help of other people because it is difficult to go through life and achieve your goals all by yourself. I am thankful that I have experienced planning and executing a big project like this now because I can learn from the mistakes I made and utilize my new skills in future projects in college and beyond.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award is important to me, not just because it is the highest award Girl Scouts can earn, but because of the experience I gained. I got to put together all of my leadership skills I had gained until this point and plan, organize, and execute a project. Not only did I succeed with this project, but I also helped my community in ways I never knew I could. I will always remember this project and the things I learned from it.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning the Gold Award helped me to become a go-getter because I had to dive right into this project. When the community cafe I was originally working with closed, I didn’t think about quitting, but wanted to continue the project because I had already put forth so much effort. Now that I know I can execute projects, I will be more willing to take them on in the future.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Aubree Crockett, Colorado Springs, “A Week in Our Lives”

 

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My project is called, “A Week in Our Lives.” Imagine living a week in another person’s “world.” What kind of things do they like to do? What are their challenges? What makes them happy? I created my project to answer these basic questions and more. Webster defines tolerance as, “the willingness to accept feelings, habits, or beliefs that are different from your own.” Throughout my life I have witnessed a lack of understanding and acceptance of people who are different, including my brother who has a disability. Our news is filled with stories of intolerance and clashes over immigration, equal rights, and refugees. We live in a global community, and my project encourages people to embrace each other’s differences and live in harmony.

Through my love of photography, I wanted to develop cultural understanding by showing how people around the world live day to day. Photography is a powerful communication tool that needs no translation. The medium doesn’t deceive.  It can show pure joy or the stark reality of a situation. In turn, an image can inspire people to take action and create positive change.

To get participants from other countries and diverse backgrounds, I formed partnerships with various international organizations. I sent out 170 kits to people from all over the world who generously opened their homes, hearts, and minds to boldly display their lives through photographs and answers to my questions. Through my partners, I donated digital cameras to places where people may not have access to the technology. The profiles and photos of 53 people from 6 continents, 23 nations, and 9 different states within the USA are displayed on my Facebook page.

Working with Compassion International, I learned that there are children around the world who live in extreme poverty; however, they can grow to be successful and independent with local and global community involvement. I was also able to visit the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, deliver cameras, and teach kids about the project. These events inspired me to further develop my project as a book and a short film, also called “A Week in Our Lives.”

I hope you will check out my Facebook page at facebook.com/aweekinourlives, be inspired by the beautiful photographs and heartwarming stories, and learn how you can take action in to create positive change your community!

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

In the year and a half of work on my project, I sent out 170 AWIOL Kits, including 35 cameras, to people on six Continents.  Participants ranged from five-months to 81-years-old and were from 23 different Nations and nine U.S. states. One of my participants is now in Antarctica, so I hope to make it seven Continents soon.

250 books were published and distributed to participants, partners and communities around the world. I shared my project with over 6,000 people at multiple community events and presentations including the Maker’s Faire and youth groups. In addition, I held and film and book premiere event for the community at the 21C Library. At each event, I provided hands-on educational activities and Take-Action opportunities to help developing communities around the world. Over $1500 in items were donated for Camera Kits and Take Action Projects.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The Facebook Page will remain up after the project so other people can see and learn from it. At the end of July, Kate Vogt, an editor of international poetry books, will take over the page. Every participant received a book, as well as local community organizations and schools.  The book has pages with Take Action ideas and information on the United Nation’s Global Goals for Sustainable Development for readers. The book and movie are to be used as tools so that people can learn from each other and enhance their world view. The donated cameras that were delivered to kids in developing countries will continue to be used as a unique method of storytelling and a way of highlighting challenges and issues in their community. I encourage every person that learns from my project to make a difference in their communities.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My whole project was designed to make national and global connections through partners and participants thanks to the use of photography and social media.

What did you learn about yourself?

I have learned so much about myself over the course of this project. The most important thing for me personally is that I am capable of more than I ever even imagined. This project has taught me how to work with adults and lead them. I also learned that I am similar to other people all over the world; as I never thought I would find so many commonalities with the people who participated in this project. It seems that we all have similar interests and beliefs on what makes a person happy, and so much more. For instance, nearly all participants (78%), said that being with family and friends made them happy. Many of the participants also love to travel and have lived all over the world. 52% said that they wear jeans, and 6 of the girls have brothers with Autism. I have discovered a new passion for helping people and even a possible career path working with Non-Profit organizations that are making a difference in the world.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award has opened so many doors for my future. I have established strong connections with many adults over the duration of the project, along with my participants. I am now interested in pursuing a career where I can help others who are facing horrible situations, like the Yazidi IDP’s, who most people would call refugees. IDP stands for Internally Displaced Peoples, and when one of my partner organizations, Global Hope Network, visits a camp, they take seeds to help the people sustain their food supply. They also train leaders to identify the needs and challenges in their community and solve the problems with local and sustainable resources.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

 The Gold Award has been important in my time as a Girl Scout because I have been able to talk to so many younger Girl Scouts about what it means to earn the Gold Award. Many of the people I talked to were working on one of the highest awards in Girl Scouts, and they told me about their wonderful ideas for their projects. It was so cool to see that my project might inspire other girls as they begin their journey towards earning their Gold Award.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I think my Gold Award has helped me in becoming a G.I.R.L. mostly by helping me become a go-getter. When I first proposed my project to the committee, they thought the project was over laden with challenges and that I would not come close to meeting my impact goals, although they didn’t tell me this at the time. After giving my final report a year and a half later, every one of them told me how touched they were by it, and that I went above and beyond what even they thought was possible. I was determined to make this project as big and the best that it could be, and I couldn’t be happier with the results.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Best Cookie Dad contest: Why my dad is the best cookie dad

Submitted by Shyann S.

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

This man has been at various cookie booths with a girl I know. This man, after waking up at 4 in the morning and coming home at 6 on the evening from work, contributes his time to work with Girl Scouts. This man is kind and considerate to others who have complaints and concerns about cookies. He has worked two, four, and eight-hour booths with me even when he is tired or hungry, yet again and again he comes back to help. He fights against the cold weather and horrible conditions of which we work through. The sales don’t benefit him in any shape or form, but there he is, happily helping his daughter. Why, people may ask. And must I respond by saying that this same man has gone to the point of not only supporting one daughter, but all three of his daughters. I’m proud to say I’m one of them. I’m proud to be able to say to other troops and kids that my dad cares. That he contributes and puts in all this effort, and for what? Just to get a reward? No. It’s just to see his daughters become experienced and filled with joy. My dad is amazing. He is a cookie dad! Better yet he is MY cookie dad and I’m thrilled to be able to say that.

Because of my dad, I have been able to learn social skills I didn’t have before. It’s because of him that I’m going to be able to reach my goal. He has taken a part of who I was in the past and molded it into who I am now. I just want to say thank you Dad. Even though you may never see this… I still thank you for being a real G.I.R.L.. And to me that means you are a great, inspirational, and responsible leader.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form and is part of the 2018 contest for Best Cookie Dad.  Is your Cookie Dad the best? Tell us about him and he’ll win a cool prize!

Best Cookie Dad contest: Best Cookie stepdad

Submitted by Ivey G.

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Not only does my stepdad like eating Girl Scout Cookies, but he’s pretty good at helping me sell them too! I am grateful to have him in my life. He is always there for me no matter what activity I am doing. He works strange and long shifts because he is in law enforcement, but every cookie season he takes the time to work at least two booths with me. I know that’s not a lot of booths, but I am happy and proud that he makes the time to be there. These are memories I will always have that make being a Girl Scout great.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form and is part of the 2018 contest for Best Cookie Dad.  Is your Cookie Dad the best? Tell us about him and he’ll win a cool prize!

Best Cookie Dad contest: Gold medal Cookie Dad

Submitted by Eden S.

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

My baby sister, Caroline, was born really early in the morning on the first day of the cookie program. My mom was in the hospital still, so my dad took me out selling cookies in our neighborhood. The weather was cold and rainy, and my dad had been up almost all night, but he knew I really wanted to earn the Game Day patch for selling 50 packages on the first day/Super Bowl Sunday, so he took me to each house and cheered me on all afternoon.

My dad also helped me work a bunch of different booths and reminds me to be confident with customers. He has helped me with my math skills too, and showed me how to make an Excel spreadsheet with formulas and everything, to keep track of my sales.

My dad works really hard in the Army and I know he would love to kick back and relax and watch the Super Bowl or the Olympics, but he gives his time to me and my siblings instead. I think he’s the one that deserves a gold medal because he’s an awesome, giving Cookie Dad!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form and is part of the 2018 contest for Best Cookie Dad.  Is your Cookie Dad the best? Tell us about him and he’ll win a cool prize!

Best Cookie Dad contest: My daddy is the best

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted by Brooklynn L.

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

My daddy is the best! He comes to all of my Girl Scout cookie booths and he is my biggest supporter.

I love Girl Scouts! It is such an amazing opportunity to meet lifelong friends and teaches me so much! I love my troop leaders and all that they do for us through out the entire year!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form and is part of the 2018 contest for Best Cookie Dad.  Is your Cookie Dad the best? Tell us about him and he’ll win a cool prize!

Best Cookie Dad contest: My hardworking dad

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted by Ella C.

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

My dad, Chris, works at night driving a semi-truck. When he comes home, he takes me door-to-door to sell cookies. One time my mom wasn’t feeling well, so my dad took me and helped me sell lots of cookies. We even sold a whole case of Thin Mints. I love my Dad.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form and is part of the 2018 contest for Best Cookie Dad.  Is your Cookie Dad the best? Tell us about him and he’ll win a cool prize!

Skyla’s Awesome Dad

Submitted by Skyla Decloedt

Colorado Springs

Pikes Peak

My dad is always helping me out. For cookie season, my dad is helping me sell cookies left and right. After school, we might go set up a booth or we might go door to door. He is really good at helping me selling cookies and he is not afraid of the competition– I have to remind him sometimes it’s for our troop. Although its my first year in Girl Scouts, I think I’m doing pretty good (mostly because my dad). I love being in Girl Scouts. Today after school he took me to go sell cookies and I sold about 60 packages of cookies. He has so many friends who like Girl Scout Cookies, which is really helpful. When it comes to helping me sell cookies, my dad is the best at it. This is my awesome dad and I’m so glad I have him.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form and is part of the 2018 contest for Best Cookie Dad.  Is your Cookie Dad the best? Tell us about him and he’ll win a cool prize!