Tag Archives: China

Host families needed for Chinese exchange program

Update: Due to low interest, this opportunity has been canceled. 

Calling on Colorado Girl Scouts along the Front Range! Do you have a daughter between the ages of 10 and 15? Would you consider being a host family for a girl of a similar age from the People’s Republic of China (PRC) this summer?

We’re looking for Girl Scout families with “green blood”, the blood of Girl Scouts, of Juliette Low, who saw a stranger as a friend she hadn’t yet met. The girls are participants in a Chinese program known as Capable Teens, modeled on American Boy Scouting. You do your usual weekend family stuff and introduce a young girl from China to a sampler of an American way of life from July 6-24, 2018. Girls will spend these two weekends with you: July 6-7, delivered to camp July 8 and acclimating to the mile high region. July 19-24 is spent with your family before their return to China early the morning of July 24. The days and nights of July 8-19 finds the girls at Girl Scout camp at Tomahawk Ranch in Bailey. The girls are excited (and nervous!) about spending time with your family in this immersion into American life.

Expectations of American families:
•Be willing to live your normal lives with the addition of a young female guest from China as well as being welcoming, loving, offering fun experiences and opening your lives to her.
•Provide normal American opportunities for her to practice her English, be a part of your family and to gain an understanding of Girl Scouting.
•Provide basic camping equipment for the girls to use: sleeping bag, pillow, towels, flashlight, possibly a duffle bag.
•Three hundred dollar stipend available to help.

By opening your door, you open a girl’s eyes to the real America: real people, real experiences and real life. At the same time, your generosity of spirit creates a positive view of the United States that crosses borders—and lasts a lifetime. Your values as a Girl Scout will create a bond with a youth in a way you never expected, make a difference in the life of a girl and help your children to learn and grow as they open their lives to another culture.

Please check out the Capable Teens Web site (www.capableteens.com) about CAPABLE TEENS for more information about the Capable Teens program and this exciting opportunity for Chinese and American girls!

For more information, please contact:
Linda Fuller, Girl Scout Program Coordinator, Capable Teens USA
linda.j.fuller@hotmail.com 303-909-2264

Host families needed

Submitted by Linda Fuller

Metro Denver

Denver

Do you have a daughter between the ages of 10 and 15? Would you consider being a host family for a girl of a similar age from the People’s Republic of China (PRC) July 14 – August 1, 2017?

We’re looking for Girl Scout families as our founder, Juliette Gordon Low, saw a stranger as a friend she hadn’t yet met. The girls are participants in a Chinese program known as Capable Teens, modeled on American Boy Scouting. You do your usual weekend family stuff and introduce a young girl from China to a sampler of an American way of life. During the week, the girls will be at Girl Scout Camp at Sky High Ranch in Woodland Park. The girls are excited (and nervous!) about spending time with your family in this immersion into American life.

Expectations of American families:

  • Be willing to live your normal lives with the addition of a young female guest from China as well as being welcoming, loving, offering fun experiences and opening your lives to her.
  • Provide normal American opportunities for her to practice her English, be a part of your family, and gain an understanding of Girl Scouting.
  • $300 stipend available to help.

By opening your door, you open a girl’s eyes to the real America: real people, experiences, and life. At the same time, your generosity of spirit creates a positive view of the United States that crosses borders—and lasts a lifetime. Your values as a Girl Scout will create a bond with a youth in a way you never expected, make a difference in the life of a girl, and help your children to learn and grow as they open their lives to another culture.

For more information, please contact Linda Fuller, Girl Scout Program Coordinator, Capable Teens USA
linda.j.fuller@hotmail.com 303-909-2264

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

The Great Panda Adventure: The Journey of a Destination

Submitted by Kathleen Burns

Centennial

Denver Metro

The vastness of time and space is so large our feeble minds can’t even begin to process it. Trillions of stars and galaxies, planets and asteroids, all moving silently through a black void in a cosmic dance of beauty and perfected harmony. All is balanced. To us, living on what seems like a mere speck, an insignificant blip in the gaze of the stars above us, we must feel very small indeed. Our world is tiny. But it is just as beautiful and strange as all the cosmos. Complex, unique, and amazing, our world is something that can be explored and treasured. There are few humans, however, that ever get an opportunity to do so. It must not seem very important to those who have traveled often, but to me, my experience on a trip to China was one I can never forget.

Last summer, my mother suggested the idea of going on a destination trip. I looked carefully through the list, choosing from the trips I knew would take me out of the United States of America. I finally settled on four to apply for, got accepted to go on three, and chose to go on one: The Great Panda Adventure. It would take me to China with fourteen other girls to work at a panda base and explore several of the cities there. I was excited and I was nervous. I would have to meet my group in San Francisco, and then fly with them all the way to Beijing. Then from Beijing, we would fly to Chengdu. I would have to go on my first flight alone to make it to San Francisco.

Despite my qualms, the flights went smoothly and we were in Chengdu before I knew it. Exhausted from flying, my new friends and I dropped our things off in our rooms and hit the streets of Chengdu. I immediately forgot how tired I was. There were so many new things to look at. I could barely turn my head fast enough as the tour bus drove us to lunch and then to an older part of the city preserved for tourists. We charged through the gates and emerged in a dazzled place of elegant buildings and sizzling food stands. Gavin, our leader, gave us permission to separate and explore on our own, and so we did. I took more pictures than I could ever need. When the group finally made it back onto the bus, it was time to go to the panda base. It gave us exactly what we wanted to see: cute pandas. When we had seen all the pandas we could for the day, we went to our first dinner in China. The food was much different than anything I’ve ever eaten before. I cautiously nibbled on each dish that was presented to us before deciding on something and going with it. Full of heavy Chinese food and weary from the two days of excitement, I finally got back to hotel and stumbled into bed.

The next morning, it was time for the panda base. Before we even got on the bus, sweat was dripping down my face and back. A hot, humid climate is no place for me. I promised myself I wouldn’t let it get to me as the bus rumbled to the panda base. The bus pulled in, we rolled out, and the two days of work began. They had us sweep and hose down the pen, clean the enclosures, feed the pandas, and even pet them. I got many pictures to show off to my friends back home. I found out that pandas are not actually all that interesting. They eat, shamble around, and for the most part are lazy, spoiled, and grumpy creatures. They eat and sleep. Pandas are, however, still adorable. People enjoy them, and it is with the help of that appeal to human emotion that they have survived this long. Of course, it is humans who are putting them in danger. The great panda has few enemies, but the most powerful of these enemies is the destruction of their homes and our inability to coexist with these gentle, intelligent creatures. Through my journey to the panda research center, I have learned much about how we hurt pandas, but I have also learned how we can help them. True to what has been told to me throughout my years as a girl scout, we must be aware of the world around. Every move we make has an impact, positive or negative. We have to be sure our impact on this world is positive. As Girl Scouts, it is our duty to take care of the Earth and all creatures on it, including humans. Treating each other right is just as important as treating the environment right. I hate to sound preachy, but I want all who read this to understand how hurt the Earth is, and how our behaviors towards it and each other has to change. It’s the only way.

I have experienced so much through this trip. I am not the same teenager who anxiously awaited her first flight alone. Because of Destinations, and because of Girl Scouts, I am more confident in everything I do. My trip to China changed my life. It made me stronger, more open-minded, and less afraid. I owe my growth over the summer to Destinations. I strongly believe that every Girl Scout should go on one of these ATS Destinations at least once in her life. The world will be open to her, and the adventures she will have will change her life forever.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Denver Metro Girl Scouts – International Campers Needing Host Famlies!

Calling on Colorado Girl Scouts in the metro Denver area!

Do you have a daughter between the ages of 11 and 13?

Would you like to be a host family for a girl between these ages (11 – 13) from the People’s Republic of China?

Five girls, participants of the CAPABLE TEENS program in China, are coming to the Denver for three weeks 17 July – 4 August 2013, chaperoned by Capable Teens representatives.  Host families in the metro Denver area are needed to provide room and board for a Chinese girl for approximately 10 days before and after Girl Scouts of CO (GSCO) resident camp during the three weeks.  By spending time with your family, these girls from the Suzhou area of China (near Shanghai) are hoping for a thorough immersion into American life.  The Chinese girls are already signed up for GSCO resident camp at Magic Sky  (“Moose Magic”, July 21-26) and for Girl Scout day camp (“Science in Our World”, Clement Park, Littleton, July 29-August 2).  Either girls will bring their own equipment or it will be provided by Capable Teens USA.

CAPABLE TEENS, modeled on the Boy Scouts of America scouting program, are bringing these young Chinese girls for an American girl experience as an American Girl Scout.  We need your help in welcoming these young girls to CO and the US and introducing them to the GSUSA way of Girl Scouting.  Small stipend per family available.

For more information and for an application, please contact:

Linda Fuller
Girl Program Coordinator, Capable Teens USA
linda.j.fuller@hotmail.com
303-909-2264