Tag Archives: Chaffee County

Gold Award sustainability in action

Sustainability is one of the requirements of the Girl Scout Gold Award and is often the most intimidating component of a project. A sustainable project is one that lasts after the girl’s involvement ends. A focus on education and raising awareness is one way to make sure a project is carried on. Workshops and hands-on learning sessions can inspire others to keep a project going. Collaborating with community groups, civic associations, local government, or religious organizations is another way to ensure the project lasts beyond the girl’s involvement.

Recently, a Gold Award Mentor in Glenwood Springs went on a camping trip to O’Haver Lake Campground outside of Salida and saw Gold Award sustainability in action – years after the Gold Award was earned!

These photos are from Emily K.’s Gold Award project in 2013! Emily’s project, “Go Fish . . . Green!” was all about helping the environment. She noticed used fishing line was clogging up local lakes and hurting the wildlife. But, with a better way to dispose of used fishing line, this could be solved. She worked for several months with the Colorado State Forest Service and Division of Wildlife on installing fishing line receptacles around Chaffee County lakes. The Forest Service has since been maintaining the receptacles and is responsible for sending the used fishing line to a recycling plant.

This is sustainability! It can be simple, easy to understand, and impact people long after you earn your Gold Award!

Emily is a now senior at University of Colorado in Boulder. She is majoring in International Affairs and Anthropology with a focus on sustainable development and Latin America. This year, she is working on her senior honors thesis and all the research that goes with it. Emily grew up in the mountains of Colorado and has a passion for the outdoors. She spent her spring semester in Cusco, Peru, studying indigenous peoples, globalization, Spanish, and the impact of social programs in relation to malnutrition. She hopes to continue her travels after graduation with backpacking in South America. Her other hobbies include reading adventure novels, cooking  delicious gluten free food, skiing in the Colorado backwoods, hiking around Boulder, and general exploring of farmers markets and other gems around Colorado.

Questions about the Gold Award and sustainability? Email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship awarded to Kelsey Quick

Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to announce Kelsey Quick is the first-ever recipient of the Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship. Kelsey from Salida, Colo., Salida High School, officially accepted her award on Friday, May 15, 2015 during the Girl Scouts of Colorado Highest Awards Celebration in Colorado Springs.

Started in 2015, the Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship fund provides annual $500 cash prizes to any and all Gold Award recipients from Chaffee County, Colo. To earn her Gold Award, Kelsey created a website and other materials to help children who have been cyberbullied. She is also the first Girl Scout from Salida to earn the Gold Award since at least 2000. You can read more about her project here.

Johanna Farrar’s husband and children started this scholarship to celebrate all of her accomplishments, particularly those within the Girl Scout community. Born in London, England, raised in a small village on the south coast of England, Johanna was a Girl Guide in her childhood. She was also the youngest ever to have achieved the Queen’s Guide Award at that time, the English equivalent of a Gold Award.  After earning a software engineering degree from Loughborough University, Johanna moved to New Jersey to work for Bell Labs. In 1985, she accepted a position with FedEx in Colorado Springs, where she met and married Gene Farrar in 1990. Johanna and Gene lived and worked in the Colorado Springs area, moving to Monument in 1992 when their oldest daughter, Hannah was born. In 1995, after their second daughter, Rachel’s birth, Johanna retired from a successful career as a Technical Advisor at FedEx for an even more successful and rewarding career as a dedicated full-time mother.

Johanna introduced her daughters to Girl Scouts at the first opportunity and became a local leader in Monument, then again after relocating to Buena Vista.  When Johanna first arrived in Buena Vista, she learned Girl Scouts had all but disappeared in Chaffee County. Johanna believed so strongly in the values and skills that scouting develops, it became a passion to reestablish scouting for girls in the high Rockies. Known to many of her friends as the “Engergizer Bunny” because of her seemingly never-ending energy and indomitable spirit, Johanna provided the leadership and drive to rejuvenate scouting in the valley. Now, for the first time, there are troops for all ages.  Additionally, Johanna loved the outdoors, including skiing, hiking, biking, mountain climbing, and especially gardening – passions she loved to share and instill in young women.

Girl Scouts learn about the science of snow

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More than 30 Girl Scouts from Eagle, Chaffee and Summit counties spent the weekend of April 25-27 learning about the impact of Colorado’s winter weather on the landscape for the rest of the year in the state. The event took place at the Keystone Science School, who in partnership with Girl Scouts of Colorado, have been providing a series of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math)-related camps over the last four of years for area Girl Scouts.

Saturday’s activities included several hours of hiking nearby Keystone to see first-hand the impacts of the snow pack. Groups hiked around Keystone, Lake Dillon as well as Montezuma, which is a 20-minute drive from Keystone, along the Continental Divide. Snow pack was gone in many areas, except for the group that hiked in Montezuma.

“We hiked in waist deep snow,” said Girl Scout Maggie, 9, from Buena Vista.

Maggie’s group found that through the course of their hike they were witnessing snow melt in process.

“The snow was hard in the morning (making it easier to walk on), and softer in the afternoon (when we sunk in walking),” said Bailey, 13, also from Buena Vista.

Out on the trail each of the groups enjoyed lunch and learned where all the snow/water in Keystone ends up.

“The water from Colorado reaches the ocean,” said Lily, 10, from Eagle. “When it rains in Keystone that water reaches the Pacific.”

Back at camp after the hike, the Girl Scouts got to take a look at an experiment they had set up before they left. Each of the groups had placed snow from around camp in a cup or jug and had made personal predictions for how much water they thought would come from the snow.

“I understood the water cycle before I came (to camp), but I didn’t know how it all happened. I’m learning a lot, and it is cool to try out (earth science),” said Chianne, 9, of Buena Vista.

One of the concluding activities on Saturday afternoon was how water causes erosion. The girls worked in groups with tubs of sand to create a landscape. Some added rocks from around camp as well. Then they turned on the small water hose hooked up to each tub and witnessed how water could help or hurt the landscape they created.

Lilli, a 6-year-old Girl Scout Daisy from Summit County, loved every moment of the camp because she can’t wait to be a scientist one day.

“I like science and learning new things. I love experiments,” said Lilli.

Grant funding provided by Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Foundation Climax-Area (CO) Community Investment Fund and Copper Environmental Foundation helped make this weekend camp and other camps in the series possible.

STEM is a core curriculum focus in Girl Scouting because more men enter STEM fields than women. Girl Scouts’ research shows that girls are interested in STEM but are not as knowledgeable about the careers and the opportunities afforded by these fields. By introducing girls to STEM in a hands-on setting and showing them how they can make the world a better place through STEM, Girl Scouts hopes to attract more girls to lead in these field.

For more information on Girl Scouts of Colorado visit girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Girl Scouts of Colorado awarded $10,000 STEM grant

Girl Scouts of Colorado was recently awarded a $10,000 grant from the Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Foundation to fund environmental education programs for Lake, Chaffee and Eagle Counties in collaboration with the Keystone Science Camp. Read more about this grant and view photos from the check presentation on April 26.