Tag Archives: Centennial

Lodging for GSCO Centennial Kickoff Celebration

Girl Scouts of Colorado is excited to celebrate 100 years of Girl Scouting in our great state! Girl Scouts of all ages, along with their friends and families, are invited to join us for a Centennial Kickoff Celebration July 23 & 24, 2016 near the site of the 1959 Girl Scout Roundup in Colorado Springs. We’ll honor our traditions with special badges, activities, and fun for the whole family.

Date: Saturday, July 23, 2016 9 a.m. – Sunday, July 24, 2016 5 p.m.

Location: Centennial Celebration Site Map

Fees:

Advance tickets: $25 per day or $35 for both days
Walkup tickets : $30 per day or $40 for both days

* Fees include a commemorative Centennial Celebration patch and t-shirt. Girl Scout members may also earn up to 12 Girl Scouts Legacy and vintage badges for no additional fee

** Children 4 and under are free.

Register Now:

http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2016/gsco_centennial_cele.html

Lodging Options:

Discounted rooms are available within walking distance at Hampton Inn, 1307 Republic Drive, Colorado Springs. There are also numerous area hotels and campgrounds available for overnight stays.

Limited cabins and camping spots are available at our residential camp property, Sky High Ranch, in Woodland Park. If you are interested in reserving a space at this property, please indicate that on the registration form and you will be redirected to a separate registration form.

*Note: Sky High Ranch accommodations are restricted to troops only. Each troop must follow Safety Activity Checkpoints supervision ratios, and have an adult who has completed Overnight Training and an adult who is CPR and First Aid Certified.

 

Providing comfort for cancer patients

Submitted by Susan Clark

Centennial

Denver Metro

The Cadettes and newly bridged Juniors of Centennial Troop 62732 spent their last meeting of the year on a community service project focusing on cancer patients. The girls created care packages with comfort items to give to cancer patients who are receiving chemotherapy. Over 30 care packages with personal notes offering encouragement will be delivered to Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Centennial girls deliver Hometown Hero Cookies to veterans

Submitted by Susan Clark

Centennial

Denver Metro

Last weekend, the Brownies and Cadettes of troop 62732 in Centennial distributed more than 200 packages of cookies to the residents and staff at the Colorado State Veteran’s Home in Denver. The girls had a chance to meet many veterans and thank them for their service.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

GSCO Centennial Kickoff Celebration

Girl Scouts of Colorado is excited to celebrate 100 years of Girl Scouting in our great state! Girl Scouts of all ages, along with their friends and families, are invited to join us for a Centennial Kickoff Celebration July 23 & 24, 2016 near the site of the 1959 Girl Scout Roundup in Colorado Springs. We’ll honor our traditions with special badges, activities, and fun for the whole family.

Date: Saturday, July 23, 2016 9 a.m. – Sunday, July 24, 2016 5 p.m.

Location: Centennial Celebration Site Map

Fees:

Advance tickets: $25 per day or $35 for both days
Walkup tickets : $30 per day or $40 for both days

* Fees include a commemorative Centennial Celebration patch and t-shirt. Girl Scout members may also earn up to 12 Girl Scouts Legacy and vintage badges for no additional fee

** Children 4 and under are free.

Register Now:

http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2016/gsco_centennial_cele.html

Girl Scouts is her passion!

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Submitted by Lisa Svede

Centennial

Metro Denver

My daughter, Lauren, in Troop 60762 did her 5th Grade Passion Project on Girl Scouts! She said Girl Scouts is a passion of hers because her grandmother was her mom’s leader, now her mom (me!) is her leader and her younger sister is now a Daisy Girl Scout.

Her topic: How does Girl Scouts teach girls to become leaders in society? She addressed her topic by focusing on these three questions:

  1. Does Girl Scouts provide girls with opportunities to practice and use leadership skills?
  2. What do Girl Scouts learn from cookie sales?
  3. How do badges and Journeys help girls learn leadership skills?

She taught many 5th grade students and their parents about the many wonderful leadership opportunities girls have in Girl Scouts and how they learn to become leaders as they advance through the levels of Girl Scouts.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Sarah Greichen, Centennial, “Score A Friend”

Sarah Greichen

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My twin brother has an Autism Spectrum Disorder, and beginning in middle school, he experienced a lack of inclusion in school clubs and sports, as well as an overall lack of friendships. I immersed myself in the “disability world,” learning about disabilities, public laws and personal rights, inclusion, community resources, and the numerous stories of children and families.  I quickly determined that kids with disabilities meet friends through school, sports, and clubs just like all other children and became an activist for school-based Unified Clubs, Unified Sports, and Unified Elective Courses. In 2013, my brother and I were appointed to our state’s Special Olympic Youth Activation Committee.  It was then that I learned about Special Olympics Project UNIFY and identified with Partner Clubs as the key component to building inclusive schools and Unified Friendships – or friendships between kids with and without disabilities.  I established Score A Friend, Inc. as a non-profit organization.  I worked within my school district and community to build Unified Clubs and Sports Programs.  In 2015, I designed the Score A Friend Club Model and web-based Score A Friend Program to activate and support youth leaders everywhere to build Score A Friend Clubs in all schools and advance inclusion throughout the world.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

  • Kids with disabilities and their families gained knowledge and skills, as well as shifts in attitude and approach, regarding their right to equal access and opportunities within their schools and communities
  • Parents learned how to access other parents for support, resources, and opportunities for advocacy through Score A Friend programs and website
  • Kids with disabilities were given opportunities to actively participate with typical peers in school during school lunch, events, and non-core courses
  • Kids with disabilities gained opportunities to participate in year-round Unified Sports in their schools & communities
  • Kids made friends and experienced Unified Friendships
  • Kids with disabilities learned about numerous community resource options and gained skills to access them
  • Kids with disabilities gained access to Score A Friend Clubs in their schools
  • Kids will have access to Unified Elective Courses in schools

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable through the Score A Friend, Inc. Non-Profit Organization:

  • A Board of Directors is in place, and I am serving as the “Founder/Chief Executive Advisor” – until I am 18 years old and can become the Chief Executive Officer. The Board is committed to supporting and growing the program.
  • The Score a Friend Website provides the Score a Friend Program to the world. Clubs will complete an annual online Registration From and Final Report. Clubs can access all program forms, resources, and online store items from the website.  All clubs will be posted on the website and be able to connect and share stories through the Score A Friend Facebook Page.
  • School-based Score A Friend Clubs at Front Range Christian School and Louisiana State University, as well as many new school clubs, will build and sustain the program in schools and communities throughout the world.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

  • Nationally, schools support students and parents to start new clubs within their schools. The Score A Friend Club Web-based Program gives students a quick and easy guide to start a new club.  Score A Friend staff is available to provide consultation and support to youth leaders starting new clubs and building inclusion in their schools and communities.
  • Globally, youth leaders and adults that support them can access the World Wide Web and access Score A Friend. Over time, I plan to translate Score A Friend materials and make them available to schools worldwide.  I plan to work with Special Olympics, UNICEF, the World Health Organization and other global organizations to promote awareness of kids with disabilities issues around the globe and determine a plan to address them, country-by-country, community-by-community, and school-by-school.

What did you learn about yourself?

·      Score A Friend is what I want to do for my future career on a global level

  • I have the passion and skills to make a difference in the world
  • I am an effective advocate and activist for kids with disabilities
  • I persevere when I meet obstacles and challenges
  • I interact and engage well with people with disabilities, as well as other youth peers and adults
  • I am creative and skilled at program design and ideas for clubs for kids
  • I have lots more to learn to be an effective advocate and to change the world for kids with disabilities
  • Being a Girl Scout has made a powerful and life-long impact on my life – shaping my overall life goals and career plan
  • Most importantly, my brother is my best friend and I am proud of him!

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

  • At Front Range Christian School, during the 2016-2017 school year, I will have opportunities to grow my leadership skills and build inclusion locally and globally.
  • As Score A Friend, Inc. CEO, I have many Score A Friend Program goals that will build my leadership skills, while advancing inclusion in the world.
  • Special Olympics will continue to support me to build my leadership skills, while working together to build inclusion in the world
  • Educating and inspiring youth around the world will build my leadership skills, while also activating youth leaders to join the unified generation and change the world.

 Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was a culmination of all I have learned in my 12 years as a Girl Scout. It allowed me to actively pursue, practice, and achieve all aspects of the Girl Scout Promise and Law. It gave me the opportunity to identify my passion and talent, and to experience real-world applications of community service and my leadership skills. The Gold Award was the most important part of my Girl Scout experience and was an honor to achieve. It will always be my greatest first step toward a future focused and committed to leadership, service, and making the world a better place.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Walnut Hills Brownies and Cadettes work together to reach goal

Submitted by Susan Clark

Centennial

Denver Metro

Our multi level troop of 3rd and 6th grade girls achieved their goal of earning the Super Bowl patch. They ran 3 Bronco-themed Cookie booths in the community and went door to door to sell over 650 boxes of cookies over Super Bowl weekend!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Cadettes earn their God & Church award

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Submitted by Mary Kritenbrink

Centennial

Denver Metro

Congratulations to Cadette Girl Scouts from Troop 60744 who have earned their God & Church award. During the course of 3 months, the girls explored their relationship with God and Church, participated in leading a worship service, delivered Meals on Wheels, and served lunch to our friends without homes in downtown Denver.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

The Great Panda Adventure: The Journey of a Destination

Submitted by Kathleen Burns

Centennial

Denver Metro

The vastness of time and space is so large our feeble minds can’t even begin to process it. Trillions of stars and galaxies, planets and asteroids, all moving silently through a black void in a cosmic dance of beauty and perfected harmony. All is balanced. To us, living on what seems like a mere speck, an insignificant blip in the gaze of the stars above us, we must feel very small indeed. Our world is tiny. But it is just as beautiful and strange as all the cosmos. Complex, unique, and amazing, our world is something that can be explored and treasured. There are few humans, however, that ever get an opportunity to do so. It must not seem very important to those who have traveled often, but to me, my experience on a trip to China was one I can never forget.

Last summer, my mother suggested the idea of going on a destination trip. I looked carefully through the list, choosing from the trips I knew would take me out of the United States of America. I finally settled on four to apply for, got accepted to go on three, and chose to go on one: The Great Panda Adventure. It would take me to China with fourteen other girls to work at a panda base and explore several of the cities there. I was excited and I was nervous. I would have to meet my group in San Francisco, and then fly with them all the way to Beijing. Then from Beijing, we would fly to Chengdu. I would have to go on my first flight alone to make it to San Francisco.

Despite my qualms, the flights went smoothly and we were in Chengdu before I knew it. Exhausted from flying, my new friends and I dropped our things off in our rooms and hit the streets of Chengdu. I immediately forgot how tired I was. There were so many new things to look at. I could barely turn my head fast enough as the tour bus drove us to lunch and then to an older part of the city preserved for tourists. We charged through the gates and emerged in a dazzled place of elegant buildings and sizzling food stands. Gavin, our leader, gave us permission to separate and explore on our own, and so we did. I took more pictures than I could ever need. When the group finally made it back onto the bus, it was time to go to the panda base. It gave us exactly what we wanted to see: cute pandas. When we had seen all the pandas we could for the day, we went to our first dinner in China. The food was much different than anything I’ve ever eaten before. I cautiously nibbled on each dish that was presented to us before deciding on something and going with it. Full of heavy Chinese food and weary from the two days of excitement, I finally got back to hotel and stumbled into bed.

The next morning, it was time for the panda base. Before we even got on the bus, sweat was dripping down my face and back. A hot, humid climate is no place for me. I promised myself I wouldn’t let it get to me as the bus rumbled to the panda base. The bus pulled in, we rolled out, and the two days of work began. They had us sweep and hose down the pen, clean the enclosures, feed the pandas, and even pet them. I got many pictures to show off to my friends back home. I found out that pandas are not actually all that interesting. They eat, shamble around, and for the most part are lazy, spoiled, and grumpy creatures. They eat and sleep. Pandas are, however, still adorable. People enjoy them, and it is with the help of that appeal to human emotion that they have survived this long. Of course, it is humans who are putting them in danger. The great panda has few enemies, but the most powerful of these enemies is the destruction of their homes and our inability to coexist with these gentle, intelligent creatures. Through my journey to the panda research center, I have learned much about how we hurt pandas, but I have also learned how we can help them. True to what has been told to me throughout my years as a girl scout, we must be aware of the world around. Every move we make has an impact, positive or negative. We have to be sure our impact on this world is positive. As Girl Scouts, it is our duty to take care of the Earth and all creatures on it, including humans. Treating each other right is just as important as treating the environment right. I hate to sound preachy, but I want all who read this to understand how hurt the Earth is, and how our behaviors towards it and each other has to change. It’s the only way.

I have experienced so much through this trip. I am not the same teenager who anxiously awaited her first flight alone. Because of Destinations, and because of Girl Scouts, I am more confident in everything I do. My trip to China changed my life. It made me stronger, more open-minded, and less afraid. I owe my growth over the summer to Destinations. I strongly believe that every Girl Scout should go on one of these ATS Destinations at least once in her life. The world will be open to her, and the adventures she will have will change her life forever.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.