Tag Archives: Centennial

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Emma Parkhurst, Centennial, “Serving students and families in need at Littleton High School”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I revitalized a clothing closet in the basement of my high school (The Lions Cupboard) and helped create a space where students from my high school and a local elementary school were able to come in and obtain clothing and other necessary items. I started by cleaning out the cupboard and gathering all items that were not usable. I brought home clothing that had stains or spots and washed it. Then, I met with the social worker at a local elementary school in order to involve their population of students and families that could benefit. A clothing drive was carried out in my neighborhood and I acquired many summer clothing and hygiene items such as shorts, swim suits, sunscreen, and towels. Then, in late May of 2017, I hosted an open house in the cupboard for families to come in and shop for clothing for summer.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Throughout this project, approximately eight families used the cupboard on a regular basis. During the open house that I hosted, two families came in and collected clothing items for the summer. I did not feel that I should inventory what each family took out, so that I could remain sensitive to the families coming in and create the most comfortable shopping experience for them.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I plan to have The Lions Cupboard become the responsibility of Littleton High School’s NHS program. I have created a brief manual explaining all of the necessary steps in keeping The Lions Cupboard functional. I have spoken with the incoming officers of NHS and they have agreed to uphold this manual and follow all of the steps to keep The Lions Cupboard going and improve it as the years continue.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

There are communities all over the United States that cannot always provide everything that they need for their families. By publishing my project on the National Honor Society website, middle and high school students from all over the country will be able to read exactly what I did to restore and upkeep The Lions Cupboard at my school in the NHS project database. This could help other students start similar programs at their own schools and create a wider national impact.

What did you learn about yourself?

From this project, I learned that to make a change or a difference in the world, you can start in your own community. You do not have to go on an international mission trip, or try to organize a group to send funds to impoverished individuals in Africa. I started in my own high school, and from there I gathered a larger community that included a local elementary school as well as my own neighborhood. I am optimistic that my project will continue to grow over the years and help many more families.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This project allowed me to become more empathetic, to set goals yet remain flexible, be able to take charge of something, communicate well with adults and my peers, realize that I needed help, lead a group of people to accomplish something, and understand the impact of my own actions. All of these qualities have allowed me to grow as a person and leader, and will help me become the best possible version of myself in the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel that earning the Gold Award was a good way to pull together everything that I have learned in Girl Scouts over the past 12 years.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award helped me become more aware of issues that start in my own community, and allowed me to come up with a plan to help solve them. I was an innovator by involving many National Honor Society and International Baccalaureate students at my high school, and turned my project into an ongoing service at the school.

I also furthered my leadership skills. I was able to really put myself in the shoes of families that would be using The Lions Cupboard. I had to think about their privacy, and what I would want if I were in their place. Empathy is essential for a leader, and helped me grow because leaders have to understand the feelings of those around them, and act for the best of those individuals to create a healthy environment.

Another essential aspect of this project were goals. I knew what I wanted, and set that as a goal for the cupboard. However, things did not go completely as planned and I had to adjust my vision many times. Leaders always need a direction to go in, and something to work towards to accomplish, but flexibility is key because things do not always work out as hoped. A leader also has to be able to take charge when needed, and lead others through the task at hand which is something that I was able to do throughout my project. Being able to get my ideas across is something that I have struggled with at times, but this project allowed me to work on it and better my leadership in that particular aspect. I also had to understand that I needed a lot of help. Mr. Hahn, Mr. Amonson, and all of the wonderful NHS members who volunteered to help me made this project possible. A good leader understands that things do not circulate completely around them, and the help of others is usually essential for success. I also understood the impact of my actions on the families in need, high school, elementary school, NHS, and the future of this project. This project impacted all of those groups, and hopefully set the cupboard up for a long span of success and growth.

All of these things that I learned from completing this project, allowed me to grow as a leader, and will continue to help me develop leadership skills far into my future.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Sarah Ness, Centennial, “Destressing Art Sessions”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My Gold Award project was created to address the high amount of stress seen in the student body at my high school, Eaglecrest High School. I held art sessions after school in the art rooms in order to help kids at my school be able to relieve stress. I worked with the National Art Honor Society and Art Club, along with the teachers that sponsor both of those clubs, in order to hold the art sessions. At the end, I had held 23 sessions.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact by giving students a survey I had made and asking them if they were feeling stressed and if they thought that the session helped to relieve their stress. In the surveys, 100% of the people surveyed answered that they were feeling stressed, with the reasons why being “family,” “schoolwork,” “work,” “sleep or the lack thereof,” and “expectations for the future.” Along with that, 100% of the survey takers said that the session did help them feel less stressed.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global/national connection is made through the access to free downloads of a manual for the sessions, and some project examples, on the website teacherspayteachers.com. I’ve also created an Instagram account that is dedicated to examples of project ideas and step-by-step instructions for how to do the projects.

What did you learn about yourself?

I’ve learned that I’m a lot more adaptable to situations that I wasn’t expecting and that I’m more capable of being a leader than what I was expecting.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I think earning my Gold Award will help show others that I am a hard worker and very dedicated. It has also taught me better ways to deal with stress around me and to help others around me deal with their stress in a healthier way.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it allowed me to use all of the skills that I have gained through my years of being a Girl Scout, along with helping me gain new ones, to make a lasting difference in the world. It helped me draw on all of my past experiences and really make the most out of everything that Girl Scouts has taught me.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award helped me become a

-G (Go-getter): by forcing me to do what I needed to do right now and not allowing me time to procrastinate or not try and do something that was needed.

-I (Innovator): by making me come up with ways to describe every step of an artistic process so that even someone who might think he or she isn’t artistic is able to do the same project as everyone else.

-R (Risk Taker): by causing me to step out of my comfort zone with talking to large groups and teachers, even though I knew that there was a chance that no one would want to help me. I also took a risk with doing an art-centered project because many people aren’t interested in the arts or don’t believe that they could do any projects, so I was taking a risk in the possibility that no one would even come to my sessions.

-L (Leader): by making me step into a leadership position and have to become a kind of teacher to the other students in the sessions along with having to come up with all of the projects and getting ready all of the materials that might be needed to do each of the projects.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Leaders get a face full of pies

Submitted by Shannon Michel

Metro Denver

Centennial

Troop Leaders Jenn Shroyer and Shannon Michel had a pie in the face challenge for their Girl Scout Cadettes. If each Girl Scout beat their individual cookie goal and the troop beat their troop goal, each girl could hit the leader with a pie. The troop’s goal was 4,000 packages of Girl Scout Cookies. The troop sold 5,148 with over 500 packages in donations and we got a face full of pies!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout earns ALL Junior badges

40963104_img_0142-1

Submitted by Addison J.

Metro Denver

Centennial

Hi! My name is Addison J. I am 11-years-old and a current Girl Scout Cadette. When I was a Junior, I did something pretty amazing that I will always remember. I earned all of the Junior badges!

It all started when my mom , who is also my troop leader, let me take a look at the badge book to see if I was interested in any badges that I wanted to earn on my own. And, of course, there was – The Musician badge! Since I was very interested in guitar at the time, I thought it would be fun. It took me no time at all to earn it. That sparked a sudden interest in Junior badges and I decided to earn another one and it all spiraled from there.

I started earning harder badges like ones that involved going on mini-field trips. My mom and I scheduled different days to go take adventures to different places in Colorado such as: The Molly Brown House for the Playing in the Past badge, leading the Pledge of Allegiance with my troop at a city council meeting for the Inside Government badge, and many more fun activities.

My experience isn’t just about earning all of the Junior badges, but also earning all three of the Journeys too, which led me to earn the Summit Award! I learned a lot earning all of these badges. My Girl Scout sisters and mom were especially supportive toward me, which also led my troop members to earning their Summit Awards too. I will always remember my experience as a fun one!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Silver Award with Shiloh House

40962780_170225120748 40963104_20170225_114250

Submitted by Lisa Svede

Metro Denver

Centennial

Congratulations to Hailey L. of Cadette Troop 60762 for earning her Silver Award this year. Hailey was recognized at the Highest Awards Celebration in Denver on May 7, 2017 for the work she did partnering with Shiloh House. Shiloh House offers specialized 24-hour care for youth between the ages of 5 to 18 experiencing severe behavioral and emotional issues. Placed in home-like settings, youth receive intensive therapeutic intervention to address behaviors and issues that impact their daily participation in the community. When Hailey reached out to Shiloh House, she learned they were in great need of lightly used or new towels, blankets, sheets, and new socks. Upon learning this, Hailey reached out to her community with a video on her mother’s Facebook page; through community websites; by asking her school to put in a newsletter; by asking her church to put in the bulletin; and making the collection drive known to all of the troops in her K-8 sister troop. For several weeks, Hailey collected items from the community. She held a collection night with her sister troops where she spoke to the troops about Shiloh House and her Silver Award project. Hailey delivered the many donated items she collected to Shiloh House in February. Congratulations, Hailey!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Silver Award working with CASA

Submitted by Lisa Svede

Metro Denver

Centennial

Lauren, with Cadette Troop 60762 of the Green Meadows Service Unit, enjoyed earning her Silver Award by working with CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children).

Over the summer, Lauren decided to go through her stuffed animal collection and donate over 50 like-new stuffed animals to a charity. Her younger sister volunteered to donate 20 of her own stuffed animals. When looking for a charity in which to donate the stuffed animals, she learned that the organization Love Does It was planning to donate 100 backpacks filled with supplies for the children of CASA. Lauren asked if she could donate her animals to the Backpack Project.

She then decided to contact her dentist and her parents’ dentist to see if they would donate toothbrushes, toothpaste, and floss. Dr. Paul Miyamoto donated a large supply of toothbrushes, travel size toothpastes, and floss to Lauren’s cause.

Lauren then decided to go through all of her books and sister’s books; they donated close to 50 books for the Backpack Project.

Once Lauren had these supplies, she got together with the co-founders of Love Does It for an afternoon and helped to stuff the 100 backpacks with the supplies she provided and other supplies that were donated by generous people in the community.

A few days after stuffing all of the backpacks, Lauren and Love Does It donated over 100 backpacks to the children of CASA. While there, Lauren learned that CASA Colorado in Aurora works with more than 800 foster and kinship care children a year! While receiving a tour, she was shown the gift closet where children can come and select a gift from the closet on their birthday. Seeing that there were not 800 gifts in the closet, Lauren decided to hold a toy drive in her community and within her sister troop to see if she could collect new toys for the CASA children. In December, Lauren was able to donate over 75 new toys to CASA to be placed in the gift closet.

Finally, during cookie sales Lauren’s troop decided to make CASA their Hometown Hero after learning more about the organization from Lauren’s Silver Award work. The eight Girl Scouts in her troop who sold cookies donated and delivered 46 boxes of cookies to CASA in April.

Lauren enjoyed learning about CASA and meeting the hard-working and caring volunteers while earning her Silver Award. She enjoyed helping an organization that helps children.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Cadette troops make shoes for Sole Hope

40963104_otex5702

Submitted by Lisa Svede

Metro Denver

Centennial

Cadette Troops 60762 and 60744 from the Green Meadows Service Unit gathered together with members of Lutheran Church of the Holy Spirit to make shoes from denim for Sole Hope and children in Africa. A big thank you to the volunteers of Love Does It, who helped the Girl Scouts to collect over 200 pairs of jeans to be made into shoes.

The jeans are repurposed to make shoes for children in Africa. The shoes will protect the children from jiggers, a parasite that burrows into the webbing of their feet when they walk without shoes in unsanitary conditions.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

City of Centennial honors Girl Scout Gold Award recipient Sarah Greichen

Centennial YAA DSC_0886

The City of Centennial honored Girl Scout Gold Award recipient Sarah Greichen as one of six outstanding Centennial high school students with a Youth Achievement Award during a City Council meeting in April. The Youth Achievement Award honors and recognizes Centennial youth who have made a significant impact in the community through volunteer work or other special deeds that demonstrate exceptional leadership. All 2017 Youth Achievement recipients received a $500 scholarship.

Sarah, a senior at Front Range Christian School, was chosen for serving as an Adam’s Camp volunteer and as president of various unified sports clubs at both Heritage and Front Range Christian schools. She sits on the Special Olympics Youth Activation Committee and earned the Girl Scout Gold Award and Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence. Her Girl Scout Gold Award project led her to create the Score A Friend, Inc., a nonprofit organization which works to include students of all abilities in school activities. Currently, there are Score A Friend clubs at Front Range Christian School, Louisiana State University, and Northern Arizona University. Sarah is also in the process of implementing nine new clubs in local area schools.

The Centennial Youth Commission and the City of Centennial’s Building Services provider, SAFEbuilt, provided $1,500 each to recognize these outstanding youth in the community.

Get to know the Gold Award

 

Date: Friday April 7, 2017  from 7 – 8 p.m.

Location: Euclid Middle School Cafeteria, Littleton

Level: Cadettes, Ambassadors, Seniors, Adults

Ambassador Girl Scout Sarah Greichen will describe her experience earning her Gold Award! Learn about her journey and participate in a Q & A session.

From Sarah:

I am so excited to present my Gold Award project to area Girl Scouts to encourage and inspire girls to take on a Gold Award project and change the world! For my Girl Scout Gold Award project, I created a non-profit organization, called Score A Friend, that supports unified clubs for children building inclusion in schools and communities throughout the world. I will be presenting the details of my three-year long project, including community connections and awards earned (Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize, National Young Women of Distinction Award, Colorado Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy). I will also talk about how I turned my Gold Award project into a nonprofit organization, as well as how it impacted my choice of college programs and future career aspirations. I will be discussing lessons learned and give advice to other girls who are interested in or are in the process of earning their gold awards. I am excited to have a Q&A at the end along with the GSCO Highest Awards Manager Aimee Bianca.

*Note: A film crew from The Foundation for a Better Life also plans to attend this event. The pictures and video could be used in printed materials, internet videos, TV commercials, etc. While Sarah is the focus of their project, anyone who attends the event may also be on camera or may be asked to participate in an interview. If you have questions or concerns, please contact GSCO Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

 

 

Cookie video contest: Take a Cookie

Submitted  by Lily 

Centennial

Metro Denver

This is my submission for the Best Cookie Video contest. I wrote the song myself. I hope to sell 275 boxes of cookies.  I’m working to earn my Silver Award. My project helps babies born too early by giving them books for their parents to read to them in the NICU. I have personal experience because my brother was born too early and I read to him. I hope you like it!

This video was submitted for the 2017 Best Cookie Video contest.