Tag Archives: Castle Rock

Girl Scout Gold Award project: Melissa Wilson, Castle Rock, “Deaf is never silent”

 

 

 

 

 

 

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I taught people who could hear how to interact with the Deaf community. To do this, I created a website/Facebook page, conducted two community presentations, placed flyers and brochures in different locations around the area, and wrote letters to local high schools about my project. My presentations can be seen on YouTube as well!

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I had people who could hear fill out a survey at the beginning and end of my presentations, asking participants if they knew/learned anything about the deaf culture. From there, I had a volunteer compile the results, and show that 85% of people in attendance learned something about being Deaf. I also was able to track where in the world the Facebook page had been seen.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustainable beyond my involvement because those who attended the seminars/visited my website will retain the information and are be able to pass it on to others. In addition, my website will be updated by my project advisor’s 7th grade class next year (She teaches English and American Sign Language). After I asked her, she replied with “Yes, I can have my 7th graders keep your website going!! That will be fun for them!!” They will continue the upkeep of the website.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The national and global link for my project is my website, Facebook page, and YouTube posts. People in other countries who want to study sign language cultures in other countries can use the website to learn about the Deaf culture here. The Facebook page was seen by over 1,000 people in eight other states and nine other countries. Letters have also been sent to local high schools with the information about the project and how to access the web elements so they will have the tools to continue sharing the information.

What did you learn about yourself?

By doing this project, I learned I can take the lead in a project and delegate tasks to others. I can not complete an entire project of this scale alone. When I did ask for help, the pieces fell into place and I became less stressed. In addition, I learned that event planning is something that was not difficult for me and I could easily/happily do it again for others.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My Gold Award will impact me in the future because employers will see that I have the tools to not only be a successful as part of a team, but also move up in managerial status and lead others with little guidance on how to lead/delegate. In addition, the Gold Award process gave me more confidence in public speaking, which will ultimately help me when I give presentations to an office full of business women and men.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Since I was a Brownie, I have been talking about earning my Gold Award. Once I became a Senior in Girl Scouting, I quickly began coming up with ideas for my project. However, I had to put it on the back-burner in high school because of sports and my troop being very active in planning events for the unit. Once that all settled and I was able to start my project and at the end of senior year I focused all of my attention on it and completed it with only a few minor glitches. My Gold Award was like my senior capstone credit; it took all the leadership and event planning skills I have gained over the last eight years and amplified it three times. Without this experience my Girl Scout career would have ended with a hole.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me to become a G.I.R.L. because….

G- I was a go-getter because I reached out to the community without any help from my parents or friends. I completed my project by picking my goal and reaching for it!

I- I was an innovator because I saw an issue that not many other people could see, and used social media and the community to help solve it.

R- I was a risk-taker because I talked to my community about an issue that was not important or known to them. Instead of thinking that no one would care about my project, I continued to share it and by showing people that I cared they began to care too.

L- I was a leader because I had to take initiative in the project and delegated tasks to others.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Daisy Troop treats Buddy Shelter with cookies

Submitted by Katie Hill

Metro Denver

Parker

Daisy Troop 65889 dropped cookies off with the Castle Rock Dumb Friends League Buddy Center. While there, we were able to take a tour and learn about all of the amazing efforts the DDFL does on a daily basis. The girls had a great time and the DDFL was delighted to get some summertime Girl Scout Cookies!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Daisy Troop 65856 delivers cookies to Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

Submitted by Kristina Graham

Metro Denver

Castle Rock

Daisy Troop 65856 delivered the second half of their Hometown Hero Girl Scout Cookies to the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office. The officers gave the girls and their families a tour of their offices.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Daisy Troop 65856 uses cookie money to go to Sky High Ranch

Submitted by Kristina Graham

Metro Denver

Castle Rock

Daisy Troop 65856 used the money they earned from their Girl Scout Cookies sales to go to Sky High Ranch as a troop. Each girl got to bring one parent and enjoyed activities such as the small animal farm, hiking to the lake, a dance party, and a camp fire. This was the highlight of the year for most girls.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Daisy Troop 65856 delivers cookies to CRPD

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Submitted by Kristina Graham

Metro Denver

Castle Rock

Our Daisy troop delivered half of their Hometown Heroes Girl Scout Cookies to the Castle Rock Police Department. The department gave the girls a tours of the police station.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Rebecca Hefty, Castle Rock, “Improving Wiggly Field Dog Park”

Rebecca Hefty

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

A huge passion of mine is animals so when I saw a need in my community to improve my local dog park, Wiggly Field Dog Park, I knew that’s what I wanted to do for my Gold Award Project. The dog park did not have any shade for dogs or places for their people to sit. For shade, we installed a 10’x 16′ Trex pergola on a cement slab.  I also installed two new picnic benches underneath of the pergola for people to sit and relax. We also installed a sign in Wiggly Field Dog Park’s parking lot, so the community can easily find the local dog park. On Sunday, January 29, 2017, from 1 – 4 p.m. I held an Opening Day Celebration at Wiggly Field Dog Park. At the celebration, I invited local dog-related businesses to have stations with merchandise for sale and/or information about their business. The celebration also had a Girl Scout troop selling Girl Scout Cookies because it was the also the first day of cookie sales for the year.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Before I did this project the park would only have a few visitors a day.  At the Opening Day Celebration, we had about 250 people come with their dogs. I had many people tell me “I have never seen this many people here,” “we come here all the time, but there are never any dogs to play with our dog,” “ I didn’t even know that we had a dog park in our neighborhood.”  Since the Opening Day Celebration the park has 10-15 visitors each day. I think this number will also increase as the weather improves and more people are doing things outside with their dogs.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

Throughout my project I made many conscious efforts to make changes to the park that would last for a long time and will not require a lot of maintenance. For example, we ordered a Trex pergola instead of a wood/ cedar pergola. Even though a wood pergola would be less expensive upfront it actually becomes more expensive in the long run. Trex pergolas are made from recycled plastic and they have a 20-year warranty on them so if something goes wrong  The Meadows Neighborhood Company, the business that maintains the park, will be able to fix it free of charge as long as they follow the warranty requirements.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have a huge passion for helping all animals especially misunderstood breeds like pit bulls and rottweilers. I feel that the Villalobos Rescue Center has made a huge difference in so many pitbulls lives but they have also made a huge impact on the way people think about pit bulls. I also sent the Villalobos Rescue Center in New Orleans a letter explaining what a Gold Award is and what I did for my project. I also attached some pictures that were taken throughout my project so they could see what I have done to better the lives of people and their dogs in my local community.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned so many valuable life skills from this project, including leadership, perseverance, and negotiation skills. There were many times during the process of my project that I thought to myself “every girl should do this kind of project” and “when I have kids, I want them to be apart of an organization like this that helps kids learn valuable life lessons and prepare them for their future.”

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

By earning my Gold Award, I have opened a lot of doors for myself. It is an accomplishment that I will be able to write on college applications and job applications for the rest of my life. Earning your Gold Award says something about who you are and also sets you apart from others.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Ever since I joined Girl Scouts I have been working towards my Gold Award by working on the journeys and earning my Bronze and Silver award. Everything I have done in Girl Scouts has prepared me for earning my Gold Award.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Lindsay Iannone, Castle Rock, “Revitalization and Organization of the Faith Lutheran Church Library”

 

Lindsay Iannone

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I addressed the library functionality at Faith Lutheran Church (FLC) and the shortage of public computer availability in the city of Castle Rock. I removed unwanted books, received new donations, and purchased books and DVDs. In addition, I created an online cataloging/organization system for the library. I also added a public computer that church members, visitors at the church waiting on financial aid, and anyone in the community can use as a resource.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The biggest example of the project’s impact on the community is the overall turnaround of the library. The library is completely organized and accessible to all members and visitors of the church and anyone in the community. Multiple members and staff of the FLC commented on how grateful they were that I completed this project and how they will be able to use the space in the future. I also reached out to different community organizations to educate them about the new computer and book resources so that they could refer their clients to the church as well.

Howis your project sustainable?Howwillyourprojectcontinue to impact after yourinvolvement?

A group within FLC will be continuing the maintenance of the library for years to come. I wrote a guide about how to keep the library organized, how the cataloging system works, and how the computer should be kept up to date, so that the group has all of the details and expectations laid out clearly. This will keep the library organized, accessible, modern, and interesting for the congregation and community to use.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global link was with the Lutheran Church of South Sudan (LCSS). The LCSS is building the Trinity Lutheran Seminary in Gambella, Ethiopia to train local and regional pastors. One of their most important buildings will be, of course, a library. However, the LCSS does not have the funds to buy thousands of resources for their seminary library. We donated 223 books, VHS, and Bibles that were not being used in the FLC library to the LCSS seminary. These books will help them reach their goal of 10,000 copies, and allow them to train even more pastors in the region.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned so many valuable things from doing this project! The most obvious skills I have developed are communication skills. Additionally, I learned more about multi-tasking, organization, and adult-life skills. I also greatly expanded my leadership experience and skills through this project, and discovered that I actually really enjoy leading teams and individuals.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award has set me on a road to success. With all the skills I’ve learned, I feel very prepared to enter college and the adult world as a strong and contributing member of society. The Gold Award has also given me an advantage in select college and scholarship programs, which will help advance my knowledge and fund my education.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been in Girl Scouts since kindergarten, so earning my Gold Award felt like the greatest culmination to my Girl Scout journey. It was a way to combine all of the skills I had learned in Girl Scouts over the years into one great project that could serve the community. There is not better way to honor and celebrate your time as a Girl Scout than through the Gold Award.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Power of cookie: Goal-setting

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Submitted by Dianne Iannone

Metro Denver

Castle Rock

Troop 61751 from Castle Rock consists of two Ambassador Girl Scouts, who started out together in a troop of 14 girls back in fourth grade. They saved their proceeds and Cookie Credits from the last five years of cookie sales for two very special events. The first was to save a bit of sale proceeds for each of their Gold Award expenditures. The second was for a special trip to be taken together their senior year in high school.

While they both will have completed their Gold Awards in the very near future, they have completed that trip. Combined they sold 5,616 cookies over the last five years, earning enough money to go on a five-day cruise to the Bahamas! Cookie sales covered the cost of airfare, a rental car to get around before and after the cruise, balcony rooms on the ship, and shore excursions. While in the Bahamas, they swam with dolphins, went snorkeling, tasted local cuisine (conch and fresh coconut), went shopping, and hung out at a local beach.

Many a cold night was spent selling cookies, but it all was worth it as they enjoyed all the activities, food, and the warm sun on the cruise ship all while basking in the sun in the Bahamas.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Power of cookie: Making the world a better place

Girl Scout Ambassador Rebecca H. from Castle Rock knows first-hand the power of the Girl Scout Cookie Sale Program. Rebecca says goal-setting, decision-making, money management, people skills, and business ethics are just some of the skills she learned from selling cookies. Most importantly, she says these skills are helping her earn the Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts. For her project, Rebecca renovated a Castle Rock dog park located in The Meadows. On Sunday, Jan. 29 (the first day of the Girl Scout Cookie sales), she hosted an Opening Day Celebration at Wiggly Field Dog Park. Dogs (and their two-legged friends) from throughout the community joined the fun and also had the opportunity to learn more about how Girl Scouts make their world a better place.

Gold Award Project: Wiggly Field Dog Park

Submitted by Rebecca H.

Castle Rock

Metro Denver

Hi, my name is Rebecca and I am an Ambassador in Girl Scouts, currently working on my Gold Award Project.  A huge passion of mine is animals so when I saw a need in my community to improve my local dog park, Wiggly Field Dog Park, I knew that’s what I wanted to do for my Gold Award Project. The dog park did not have any shade for dogs or places for their people to sit.  For shade, we installed a 10’x 16′ Trex pergola on a cement slab.  I also installed two new picnic benches underneath of the pergola for people to sit and relax. This week, we are installing a sign in Wiggly Field Dog Park’s parking lot, so the community can more easily find the local dog park. You can take your beloved dogs to play there and get them the best products from treehousepuppies.

On Sunday, January 29, 2017, from 1 – 4 p.m., there will be an Opening Day Celebration at Wiggly Field Dog Park across the street from 3301 Meadows Blvd, Castle Rock, CO 80104.  At the celebration, local dog-related businesses will have stations with merchandise for sale and/or information about their business. The celebration will also have a Girl Scout troop selling Girl Scout Cookies. I hope to see you and your furry friend there on Sunday to play in the newly renovated dog park!

Wiggly Field Opening Day Celebration