Tag Archives: Castle Rock

Girl Scout Gold Award project: Abagail Sickinger, Castle Rock, “Operation Occupation”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I hosted an event, called Operation Occupation, to teach high school students how to get a job. There were employers, speakers, and lots of information and research that they interacted with. They learned things like how to fill out a resume, how to dress and behave properly at interviews and on the job, and went through a mock interview.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact on my target audience with two different surveys. The first one was given to them at the event as they were leaving. This one had questions pertaining to the short-term affects they got from the event. Some questions included, “Did you learn something new?” and similar questions to judge their initial thoughts of the event. The second one was emailed to them at the end of the summer to see how they used the information over the two months after the event. Some of these questions were, “Did you get a job?”, “If you did get a job, where?”, “Do you feel confident when applying for jobs now?”, and so on.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable through the FBLA Club at Douglas County High School. I received a letter of commitment from the FBLA Adviser, that was signed by him, the principal of the school, and the school district. A couple of officers from the club attended my event to make sure that theirs is as close to mine as it can be, while changing what needs to be changed to make it better.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project had both a global and national connection. The national connection is a website in Florida that shared my website with their company. I also contacted Gap Outlet and asked them to put the links to all of my social media on their national page. This will take a while to go through the system, but I am hopeful it will get through. The global connection was mainly through my YouTube channel, I have reached three different countries with my video, United States, Canada, and The Philippines. I am hoping to expand this outreach even further.

What did you learn about yourself?

A couple of things that I learned about myself through this project is that I am very organized when I want to be, and I am great at running events in a short period of time. I started working on my event way too late, and realized that with the amount of compliments I got about how smooth my event was, that I am good at pulling together at the end. Also, I stayed organized throughout the entire project to keep from missing anything.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The Gold Award has taught me many things. It has given me a lot of leadership qualities and skills that I will use for the rest of my life. It has also taught me to not procrastinate, and to work in a timely fashion. I will never put off something until the last minute again, because I do not like the feeling that I might be forgetting something important.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel that the Gold Award was a big part of my Girl Scouting experience because it put all of the things I learned throughout the program all together. It’s almost like it tied off my Girl Scouting years (as a girl) with a bow.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

The Gold Award taught me to be G.I.R.L. by making me be a go-getter. I have always had a passion for helping others my age, and this project made me take a step to helping them. Seeing progress was being made by the people who attended, showed me that I made a difference in their lives. I became a risk-taker by learning how to speak in front of an audience, and how to talk to adults and tell them that I need help. I became a leader by learning how to find a problem in the community, what I can do to fix it, and stepping out of my comfort zone, to get it done. Also, I learned how much the world needs people to step up and be the leader for causes that don’t get enough attention.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award project: Alexis Montague, Castle Rock, “Encouraging females to pursue STEM careers”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I focused on encouraging girls to pursue STEM careers by providing middle school and high school girls with role models. My research showed that STEM is primarily dominated by males with ratio being around ¾ male and ¼ females. Women in STEM is a complex issue that is caused by numerous problems. I decided to focus on role models since studies have shown that by providing successful female role models, more women are willing to put in the effort for these careers. In order to achieve this, I developed a panel consisting of engineers from many different fields within engineering. They came and talked about the challenges within the STEM field and how to overcome them. The panelists also discussed what employers are looking for both in academics and internships.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my project through a survey given at the end of my panel event. The survey contained questions about how to improve the event for the future and if the girls who attended had learned anything new. I also talked to many of the girls after my event to hear what they had thought about the event.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustained through my high school. My school has been divided up into four different academies: STEM, BHS, VPA, and LGC. As I had already done my event at the school and had numerous teachers and administers involved, my advisor/teacher is willing to sponsor another girl to run the event with the guidance of my manual, so all they must do is choose a date that works with them, find panelists, and advertise to the middle schools.

One of my panelists is a member of the Denver chapter of Business and Professional Women. When she heard that a component of the Gold Award project was that it needed to be sustained in some way, her chapter agreed to also put on this event in the future as part of their programming.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The imbalance between the genders within STEM careers is a national issue. For my project to reach a wider audience nationally, I created a website. The website depicts the issue of women in STEM and highlights some of the reasons behind the difference between the genders.  I sent letters to 50 schools within Colorado, ranging from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs, with the information about my event and what girls learned, why they should do it, and where they could get the manual and visit my website for more information.

What did you learn about yourself?

The most important aspect that I learned about myself was discovering what I was most passionate about and discovered my voice for it. It has enabled me to stand for what I believe in and develop solutions for the problems. It also showed me that I am able to successfully put on events as a leader.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My Gold Award has provided me with numerous professional skills and the ability to put on a major event. I know it will have a major impact on my ability within my own career. My Gold Award taught me invaluable tools that I need for my future career, both in acting professional and the ability to lead and develop a major event.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been a Girl Scout since I was in kindergarten. The Gold Award was the final award that I could complete within the program after finishing the Bronze and Silver. But, it was more than that. The Gold Award took all my leadership and event planning skills I had obtained through the program and pushed them to their limits, and expanded past what I already had. It showed me what I was able to achieve with the skills I had learned through my 13 years of being a Girl Scout.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

G:  The Gold Award made me find an issue that occurred within my community and forced me to find a solution, or in the case of my project be a part of the solution. It made me develop a plan in order to achieve the solution of providing role models so that I could pursue a component of the entire problem of the unbalanced genders within the STEM field.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award project: Kamaryn Evans, Castle Rock, “Woman to woman: An awareness project”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I chose to take on the the disconnect between domestic violence resources and the public as well as break the stigma surrounding domestic violence victims.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

My audience was the women in Castle Rock and surrounding towns. I reached a total of around 90 people through my event, Facebook page, website, and pledge for people to be allies against domestic violence. I also measured an impact to my audience through the 11 purses and one baby bag that were stuffed with necessities and sent over to the Crisis Center in Castle Rock.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable through all of the channels my materials have been passed on to. I have passed on all paper materials to the Crisis Center for possible future use. I have also partnered with some teachers and counselors from Douglas County School District to pass along  paper materials, to help establish an understanding of domestic violence and creating healthy relationships at an early age.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My national connection is through the media. This topic first peaked my interest because of local news stories as well as national news stories and I saw a disconnect of resources and those affected. My national connection really was what began my project.

What did you learn about yourself?

This project was quite an undertaking for me and I feel like I gained a lot more knowledge about myself because of it. Mostly, I took this experience as the beginning of what the real world looks like. In that in everyday life you have to learn how to be around people and to work with people. In this project, I learned that I must be patient with people because the world doesn’t always work on your time. Along with that, I learned about how to communicate my ideas better and listen to my mentors and try to better myself. I also learned how I deal with tasks under different types of deadlines and pressure- things I will take with me to the future as I plan to study journalism in college.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I am well versed in the knowledge that the journalism world has many deadlines. In fact, it revolves around such things. It is for that reason alone I know that my Gold Award will help me in the future because I had defined deadlines for myself at multiple stages in this project process and I pushed myself to meet said deadlines in record time. I have also learned better ways to communicate with a team and how to grow the bigger picture with the help of others in addition to oneself. Just like my mentor and advisers did for me.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award helped me to become a G.I.R.L through teaching me how to get out of my comfort zone and be a risk-taker. I took a lot of risks mostly with my timing of my project as well as the topic I picked because I wasn’t quite sure of the obstacles that I would encounter because I chose a more difficult cause like domestic violence.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award project: Melissa Wilson, Castle Rock, “Deaf is never silent”

 

 

 

 

 

 

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I taught people who could hear how to interact with the Deaf community. To do this, I created a website/Facebook page, conducted two community presentations, placed flyers and brochures in different locations around the area, and wrote letters to local high schools about my project. My presentations can be seen on YouTube as well!

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I had people who could hear fill out a survey at the beginning and end of my presentations, asking participants if they knew/learned anything about the deaf culture. From there, I had a volunteer compile the results, and show that 85% of people in attendance learned something about being Deaf. I also was able to track where in the world the Facebook page had been seen.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustainable beyond my involvement because those who attended the seminars/visited my website will retain the information and are be able to pass it on to others. In addition, my website will be updated by my project advisor’s 7th grade class next year (She teaches English and American Sign Language). After I asked her, she replied with “Yes, I can have my 7th graders keep your website going!! That will be fun for them!!” They will continue the upkeep of the website.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The national and global link for my project is my website, Facebook page, and YouTube posts. People in other countries who want to study sign language cultures in other countries can use the website to learn about the Deaf culture here. The Facebook page was seen by over 1,000 people in eight other states and nine other countries. Letters have also been sent to local high schools with the information about the project and how to access the web elements so they will have the tools to continue sharing the information.

What did you learn about yourself?

By doing this project, I learned I can take the lead in a project and delegate tasks to others. I can not complete an entire project of this scale alone. When I did ask for help, the pieces fell into place and I became less stressed. In addition, I learned that event planning is something that was not difficult for me and I could easily/happily do it again for others.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My Gold Award will impact me in the future because employers will see that I have the tools to not only be a successful as part of a team, but also move up in managerial status and lead others with little guidance on how to lead/delegate. In addition, the Gold Award process gave me more confidence in public speaking, which will ultimately help me when I give presentations to an office full of business women and men.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Since I was a Brownie, I have been talking about earning my Gold Award. Once I became a Senior in Girl Scouting, I quickly began coming up with ideas for my project. However, I had to put it on the back-burner in high school because of sports and my troop being very active in planning events for the unit. Once that all settled and I was able to start my project and at the end of senior year I focused all of my attention on it and completed it with only a few minor glitches. My Gold Award was like my senior capstone credit; it took all the leadership and event planning skills I have gained over the last eight years and amplified it three times. Without this experience my Girl Scout career would have ended with a hole.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me to become a G.I.R.L. because….

G- I was a go-getter because I reached out to the community without any help from my parents or friends. I completed my project by picking my goal and reaching for it!

I- I was an innovator because I saw an issue that not many other people could see, and used social media and the community to help solve it.

R- I was a risk-taker because I talked to my community about an issue that was not important or known to them. Instead of thinking that no one would care about my project, I continued to share it and by showing people that I cared they began to care too.

L- I was a leader because I had to take initiative in the project and delegated tasks to others.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Daisy Troop treats Buddy Shelter with cookies

Submitted by Katie Hill

Metro Denver

Parker

Daisy Troop 65889 dropped cookies off with the Castle Rock Dumb Friends League Buddy Center. While there, we were able to take a tour and learn about all of the amazing efforts the DDFL does on a daily basis. The girls had a great time and the DDFL was delighted to get some summertime Girl Scout Cookies!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Daisy Troop 65856 delivers cookies to Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

Submitted by Kristina Graham

Metro Denver

Castle Rock

Daisy Troop 65856 delivered the second half of their Hometown Hero Girl Scout Cookies to the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office. The officers gave the girls and their families a tour of their offices.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Daisy Troop 65856 uses cookie money to go to Sky High Ranch

Submitted by Kristina Graham

Metro Denver

Castle Rock

Daisy Troop 65856 used the money they earned from their Girl Scout Cookies sales to go to Sky High Ranch as a troop. Each girl got to bring one parent and enjoyed activities such as the small animal farm, hiking to the lake, a dance party, and a camp fire. This was the highlight of the year for most girls.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Daisy Troop 65856 delivers cookies to CRPD

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Submitted by Kristina Graham

Metro Denver

Castle Rock

Our Daisy troop delivered half of their Hometown Heroes Girl Scout Cookies to the Castle Rock Police Department. The department gave the girls a tours of the police station.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Rebecca Hefty, Castle Rock, “Improving Wiggly Field Dog Park”

Rebecca Hefty

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

A huge passion of mine is animals so when I saw a need in my community to improve my local dog park, Wiggly Field Dog Park, I knew that’s what I wanted to do for my Gold Award Project. The dog park did not have any shade for dogs or places for their people to sit. For shade, we installed a 10’x 16′ Trex pergola on a cement slab.  I also installed two new picnic benches underneath of the pergola for people to sit and relax. We also installed a sign in Wiggly Field Dog Park’s parking lot, so the community can easily find the local dog park. On Sunday, January 29, 2017, from 1 – 4 p.m. I held an Opening Day Celebration at Wiggly Field Dog Park. At the celebration, I invited local dog-related businesses to have stations with merchandise for sale and/or information about their business. The celebration also had a Girl Scout troop selling Girl Scout Cookies because it was the also the first day of cookie sales for the year.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Before I did this project the park would only have a few visitors a day.  At the Opening Day Celebration, we had about 250 people come with their dogs. I had many people tell me “I have never seen this many people here,” “we come here all the time, but there are never any dogs to play with our dog,” “ I didn’t even know that we had a dog park in our neighborhood.”  Since the Opening Day Celebration the park has 10-15 visitors each day. I think this number will also increase as the weather improves and more people are doing things outside with their dogs.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

Throughout my project I made many conscious efforts to make changes to the park that would last for a long time and will not require a lot of maintenance. For example, we ordered a Trex pergola instead of a wood/ cedar pergola. Even though a wood pergola would be less expensive upfront it actually becomes more expensive in the long run. Trex pergolas are made from recycled plastic and they have a 20-year warranty on them so if something goes wrong  The Meadows Neighborhood Company, the business that maintains the park, will be able to fix it free of charge as long as they follow the warranty requirements.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have a huge passion for helping all animals especially misunderstood breeds like pit bulls and rottweilers. I feel that the Villalobos Rescue Center has made a huge difference in so many pitbulls lives but they have also made a huge impact on the way people think about pit bulls. I also sent the Villalobos Rescue Center in New Orleans a letter explaining what a Gold Award is and what I did for my project. I also attached some pictures that were taken throughout my project so they could see what I have done to better the lives of people and their dogs in my local community.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned so many valuable life skills from this project, including leadership, perseverance, and negotiation skills. There were many times during the process of my project that I thought to myself “every girl should do this kind of project” and “when I have kids, I want them to be apart of an organization like this that helps kids learn valuable life lessons and prepare them for their future.”

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

By earning my Gold Award, I have opened a lot of doors for myself. It is an accomplishment that I will be able to write on college applications and job applications for the rest of my life. Earning your Gold Award says something about who you are and also sets you apart from others.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Ever since I joined Girl Scouts I have been working towards my Gold Award by working on the journeys and earning my Bronze and Silver award. Everything I have done in Girl Scouts has prepared me for earning my Gold Award.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Lindsay Iannone, Castle Rock, “Revitalization and Organization of the Faith Lutheran Church Library”

 

Lindsay Iannone

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I addressed the library functionality at Faith Lutheran Church (FLC) and the shortage of public computer availability in the city of Castle Rock. I removed unwanted books, received new donations, and purchased books and DVDs. In addition, I created an online cataloging/organization system for the library. I also added a public computer that church members, visitors at the church waiting on financial aid, and anyone in the community can use as a resource.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The biggest example of the project’s impact on the community is the overall turnaround of the library. The library is completely organized and accessible to all members and visitors of the church and anyone in the community. Multiple members and staff of the FLC commented on how grateful they were that I completed this project and how they will be able to use the space in the future. I also reached out to different community organizations to educate them about the new computer and book resources so that they could refer their clients to the church as well.

Howis your project sustainable?Howwillyourprojectcontinue to impact after yourinvolvement?

A group within FLC will be continuing the maintenance of the library for years to come. I wrote a guide about how to keep the library organized, how the cataloging system works, and how the computer should be kept up to date, so that the group has all of the details and expectations laid out clearly. This will keep the library organized, accessible, modern, and interesting for the congregation and community to use.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global link was with the Lutheran Church of South Sudan (LCSS). The LCSS is building the Trinity Lutheran Seminary in Gambella, Ethiopia to train local and regional pastors. One of their most important buildings will be, of course, a library. However, the LCSS does not have the funds to buy thousands of resources for their seminary library. We donated 223 books, VHS, and Bibles that were not being used in the FLC library to the LCSS seminary. These books will help them reach their goal of 10,000 copies, and allow them to train even more pastors in the region.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned so many valuable things from doing this project! The most obvious skills I have developed are communication skills. Additionally, I learned more about multi-tasking, organization, and adult-life skills. I also greatly expanded my leadership experience and skills through this project, and discovered that I actually really enjoy leading teams and individuals.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award has set me on a road to success. With all the skills I’ve learned, I feel very prepared to enter college and the adult world as a strong and contributing member of society. The Gold Award has also given me an advantage in select college and scholarship programs, which will help advance my knowledge and fund my education.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been in Girl Scouts since kindergarten, so earning my Gold Award felt like the greatest culmination to my Girl Scout journey. It was a way to combine all of the skills I had learned in Girl Scouts over the years into one great project that could serve the community. There is not better way to honor and celebrate your time as a Girl Scout than through the Gold Award.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org