Tag Archives: Cadette

Cadettes of Troop 65659 Complete aMAZE Journey

Submitted by Jessica Spangler

Metro Denver

Denver

Cadettes from Troop 65659 joined with two Juliettes to complete the aMAZE Journey. To earn their Diplomat Award, they chose to focus their project on the topic of first impressions. They created a fun story about puppets at a theme park to show viewers why you should not jump to conclusions based on your first impression of a person (or a puppet).

They also addressed how we might give someone who is leaving a bad first impression a chance by helping them, and the consequences of stereotyping a person based on what you see. They agreed to share their video with local neighborhood groups so that other children would be able to enjoy it and learn from it. Their video can be seen at https://youtu.be/jirSh4DmMDo .

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Tools for Independence Club for Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors

Calling all Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors!

Do you want to be more independent when it comes to your clothes? Do you want to be able to fix a plumbing emergency on your own? Do you want to help more in the kitchen? Do you want to be able to do basic first-aid? Then, Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Tools for Independence Club is the club for you!

Starting September 21, 2020, GSCO  staff will be teaching girls to be more independent by teaching laundry skills, toilet maintenance, household cleaning skills, and basic first-aid. In this biweekly virtual series, you will get to know yourself and what you are capable of by learning and practicing skills that are important for your independence. You will have fun and try new things in a safe, engaging environment. Each session will focus on a particular skill. Join us online every other Monday at 4 p.m.

  • September 21: Laundry Part One
  • October 5: Laundry Part Two
  • October 19: All About Toilets
  • November 2: Household Cleaning
  • November 16: First-Aid One
  • December 7: First-Aid Two

Participation satisfies some requirements for the Junior Independence and multi-level First-Aid badges.

Register here for all sessions, or just pick a few to attend.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Register NOW for Build Like a Girl with GE Johnson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Update as of September 15, 2020: Registration for this event has ended. We have reached capacity.

GSCO and GE Johnson are excited to invite Girl Scout Cadettes and Seniors to participate in our at-home, virtual “Build Like a Girl – Careers in Construction Day” on Saturday, September 26, 2020 from 10 a.m. – noon.  Girls are invited to pick up supply kits to build their own bee house prior to the program date and join a live session on September 26 to learn how to build the habitat directly from GE Johnson employees. Supply pick-up is September 21-25 at various locations available. Girls will also get to learn from an animal expert at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo about pollinators and their habitats, and participate in the virtual tour of the new hippo and penguin exhibit recently built by GE Johnson Construction.

Register now: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2020/build_like_a_girl_ca.html

Registration will close September 17 OR when the program reaches capacity.

Supply kits will be available to pick up at the locations below the week of September 21-25 OR participants are welcome to get their own supplies using the list provided. Detailed instructions regarding supply pick-ups will be provided closer to the program date. You must select your supply pick-up location upon registration.

Included with supply kits will be “Build Like a Girl” patches and T-shirts for Girl Scouts. Patches will be mailed to all girl participants after the program date. There is a $15 program fee for supply kits. Girl Scouts who are gathering their own supplies will be charged an $8 program fee and will receive their patches and T-shirts in the mail.

Supply pick-up locations:

  • GEJ Colorado Springs Office, 25 N. Cascade Ave., Suite 400, 80903
  • Vail Health, 181 W. Meadow Dr., Vail 81657
  • Cherry Creek – 240 St Paul St., Denver 80206
  • GEJ Greenwood Village Office: 5613 DTC Parkway, Suite 450, 80111
  • Ball Aerospace, 11 Longs Peak Dr., Broomfield 80021
  • Green Mountain High School, 13175 W Green Mountain Dr., Lakewood 80228
  • Sierra Nevada IAS, 12500 Belford Ave., Englewood 80112
  • ENT Credit Union New Headquarters, InterQuest Pkwy & Federal Dr., Colorado Springs 80921

Information about how to join the live session on Saturday, September 26 will be emailed directly to all participants by September 23.

Cadettes will work on requirements for the Woodworker badge and Seniors will work on requirements for the Social Innovator badge.

All participating Girl Scouts must:

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Register now for STREAM Girls in Colorado Springs

Join Colorado Trout Unlimited (CTU) for STREAM Girls Thursday, September 10 – Sunday, September 20, 2020! This is a hybrid virtual/take-home program for Girl Scout Juniors and Cadettes.

  • Virtual kick-off: Thursday, September 10 at 5 p.m. via Zoom
  • Virtual reflection: Sunday, September 20 at 3 p.m. via Zoom

 

  • Gear pick-up at Bear Creek Regional Park, Colorado Springs: Friday, September 11, 4 – 6 p.m.
  • Gear drop off at Bear Creek Regional Park, Colorado Springs: Sunday, September 20, 5 p.m.

Cost: $5 per gear pick up OR $3 per girl if using your own gear

Register NOW: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/stream_girls_blended_09_10_2020

STREAM Girls gives Girl Scout Juniors and Cadettes the opportunity to earn a special patch as they serve as citizen scientists, anglers, and artists, to build an appreciation for watershed conservation and the environment. This outdoor watershed experience employs STEM-education (science, technology, engineering, math) plus recreation and arts to explore a local stream.

Every person is a citizen of her watershed, and Colorado Trout Unlimited (TU) has partnered with Girl Scouts of Colorado so that girls will get the complete picture of what their stream could mean to them.

In this hybrid take home/virtual program, TU will provide Girls Scouts with the necessary gear, a STREAM Girls Field Notebook, and a resource list with videos guiding Girl Scouts through six activities that they will complete over ten days. Additionally, girls are expected to join a virtual program kick off on Thursday and a reflection meeting the next Sunday to discuss what they have learned. Activities include:

  • Stream Walk – Observing and documenting the stream/river and surrounding area
  • Go with the Flow – Calculating river flow rates using everyday tools and simple math
  • Macroinvertebrate Survey – Investigating the insect life that lives in the stream and support fish
  • Fly-Casting – Developing skills to fly fish and practicing in your own backyard/neighborhood park
  • Fly-Tying – Creating a “fly” to imitate one of the macroinvertebrates commonly found in Colorado
  • Scavenger Hunt/Bracelet Building – Testing your knowledge of healthy streams and creating a unique bracelet to represent your local watershed!

Activities are expected to take approximately six hours, in total, and can be broken up into several days. Colorado Trout Unlimited will provide the necessary gear and supplies associated with each activity. Gear will be picked-up and dropped off at Bear Creek Regional Park East. Colorado Trout Unlimited has enough gear/supplies for 24 participants. Additional participants may be able to register, if using their own gear or sharing with another Girl Scout. Please acknowledge any shared gear in registration.

Adults picking up gear on behalf of Girl Scouts will be required to complete a gear agreement upon pick up. Certificates of completion and patches will be distributed upon gear drop off. If using your own gear, certificates of completion and patches will be mailed after the program is complete. Please indicate if you are picking up supplies or using your own supplies.

As a self-guided event, Colorado Trout Unlimited and GSCO encourage Girl Scouts to complete this activity with their families. Please be sure to follow all state, county, and local public health guidelines surrounding COVID-19.

Registration will close on Monday, September 7 OR when capacity has been reached. All waivers, pre-information, and log in information for virtual meetings will be provided for all participants via email after registration closes.

If picking up supplies and gear, all supplies will be packaged as a set and available during the gear pick-up. Participants are welcome to use their own gear/equipment. Please use the list below when compiling your own gear/supplies. For participants not requiring a gear set, the Field Notebook and Macroinvertebrate Guide will be sent via email.

Supply List:

  • Field Notebook and Macroinvertebrate Guide
  • Writing Utensil (Colored pencils are great to have, as well)
  • Wading Boots/Waders (If weather/water temperatures are warm enough, sturdy water shoes can be used)
  • Stopwatch (smartphones work great)
  • Something that floats (stick, ping pong ball, etc)
  • Calculator (phone works great)
  • Measuring Tape (at least 30’)
  • Bug net (Kitchen Strainer will work)
  • Collection Pan (Tupperware or small white buckets can be effective)
  • Magnifying glass
  • Small sorting tray (ice cube trays work well)
  • Fly rod, reel, and line
  • Fly tying vise
  • Fly tying tools
  • Fly tying materials for midge pattern including hook and thread.
  • Extra fly line for bracelet (Other material will work, as well)
  • Beads for bracelet activity

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Cadette Book Club: What is the First Rule of Punk?

Be yourself.

That might be the only rule that our 12-year-old punk rocker protagonist, Malú, wants to follow. Conform to dress codes? She’d rather dye her hair green. Try to be popular at school? She’d rather start her own rad band.

Malú is sassy, irreverent, creative, and full of moxie. She loves pizza, skateboarding, and stealing her mom’s new magazines to make cool zines. Read up and rock out with our marvelous misfit as she learns to make her own rules.

Join Girl Scouts of Colorado on September 10, 2020 at 4 p.m. for Cadette Book Club as we discuss “The First Rule of Punk” by Celia C. Pérez. Please read the book in its entirety before the book club and come prepared with your brilliant thoughts, poignant questions, and outstanding opinions.

Register Here: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2020/cadette_book_club_vi_84369321.html

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Cadette Finding Common Ground badge: Step Five of Five

The great thing about our country is we all can have different backgrounds, experiences and opinions, and still come together and work towards the common good. No matter the level of government – from your local school board to the Congress – people have to compromise – give up some things you want in order to support somethings someone else wants – in order to accomplish their goals. When you earn the Cadette Finding Common Ground badge, you will learn how governments do that – and how you can do it in your everyday life.

Step One: Get to Know Someone Different from You

Step Two: Make Decisions in a Group

Step Three: Explore Civil Debate

Step Four: Understand a Compromise

Step Five: Finding Common Ground Through Mediation

Mediation is the process by which a third party – called a mediator – helps people or groups find common ground. There are many different kind of mediators, including peer mediators, who are trained to mediate within their school, club or group. Other kinds of mediators help families who are going through a hard time, neighbors who are having trouble getting along, and employees and employers decide on fair compensation. In this step, you will be the mediator who helps other people find common ground and come to an agreement. Do one or more of the following activities:.

Follow the six steps of a formal mediation:

  1. Give your opening remarks: Review the conflict and set ground rules.
  2. State the problem: Let both people state their positions.
  3. Gather information: Ask open-ended questions (those without yes or no answers) to get to the heart of each person’s position.
  4. Summarize: Summarize the conflict, based on what you have heard.
  5. Brainstorm solutions: Brainstorm all together about possible solutions.
  6. Reach an agreement: Offer ideas about where you think there is common ground. If the two sides don’t agree, start with step four, and keep going until you reach an agreement.

Mediate a mural project conflict. Here’s the conflict: Your Girl Scout troop has decided to paint a mural for their Girl Scout Silver Award project. Your troop needs to decide the following things: Where to paint the mural, the subject of the mural, the design of the mural, when to paint the mural, and how to raise money to pay for the supplies. Before the mediation begins, give each person time to decide what they think the answers to all the decisions should be, and come up with three reasons why they think their solutions are fair to the group and the community. Using the six steps of a formal mediation above, mediate the discussion until a solid plan is agreed to by everyone.

OR

Mediate with a pro. Invite a civil mediator or someone studying law or conflict resolution to come to your next online meeting. Ask them to share what they’ve learned about mediation, and have them teach you their favorite mediation skills.

OR

Suggest solutions for a current international conflict. What are the issues both sides are facing? They’ve come to you for help on ending the conflict. On your own or with your troop, look for the common ground, and write a draft peace treaty that would be a fair compromise for both sides. Share what you’ve learned on our blog or with your history or social studies teacher.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Cadette Finding Common Ground badge: Step Four of Five

The great thing about our country is we all can have different backgrounds, experiences and opinions, and still come together and work towards the common good. No matter the level of government – from your local school board to the Congress – people have to compromise – give up some things you want in order to support somethings someone else wants – in order to accomplish their goals. When you earn the Cadette Finding Common Ground badge, you will learn how governments do that – and how you can do it in your everyday life.

Step One: Get to Know Someone Different from You

Step Two: Make Decisions in a Group

Step Three: Explore Civil Debate

Step Four: Understand a Compromise

A compromise is an agreement where both people give up something they want in order to find the common ground where everyone gets a little bit of what they want. Do one or more of the following activities to learn more about compromise.

A Community Compromise. Learn about a compromise in your community, such as the dress code at your school, or the amenities in a new park or recreation center. Where did the two sides disagree at the beginning? What decision did they make in the end? What did each side give up to reach a compromise? How does this compromise affect your community and your life?

OR

A Family or Friendship Compromise. Think of a situation where you and someone in your household had to compromise to be able to live in peace. Use that situation and talk to an adult in your household about a compromise that made your family what it is today. Can you imagine a more positive outcome? Share your ideas with your family and see if you can effect positive change.

OR

A state or national compromise. Learn about a compromise that occurred in your state or at the national level. You can talk with your history teacher, local historian, elected official, or another who has expert knowledge in the compromise. Where did the two sides differ in the beginning? Where did they find common ground? What did each side give up to reach a reasonable agreement? How does this compromise affect your life? What other possible outcomes could there have been?

In the next step, you will learn how to find common ground through the process of mediation.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Cadette Finding Common Ground badge: Step Three of Five

The great thing about our country is we all can have different backgrounds, experiences and opinions, and still come together and work towards the common good. No matter the level of government – from your local school board to the Congress – people have to compromise – give up some things you want in order to support somethings someone else wants – in order to accomplish their goals. When you earn the Cadette Finding Common Ground badge, you will learn how governments do that – and how you can do it in your everyday life.

Step One: Get to Know Someone Different from You

Step Two: Make Decisions in a Group

Step Three: Explore Civil Debate

A debate is a discussion between two people who have different opinions on any given topic. It is important to know how to draw on facts and logic to support your point of view. It is essential to stay calm. Ruth Bader Ginsburg said, “Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one’s ability to persuade,” and the point of a debate is to persuade others to your point of view. A great way to persuade others is to keep an open mind their point of view and to find common ground!

Choose one or more of the following activities

Watch candidates for elected office debate. It could be for any office – from your local school board to the U.S. Presidency. After the debate, discuss with your Cadette troop or your family the arguments on all sides, and whether the candidates found any common ground – or whether they were even looking. Where the candidates persuasive? Why or why not?

OR

Understand a famous debate in history. It might be a debate over the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970s, or between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas in the 1860s. Find out why the debate was important to American history and who is considered the winner and why? Did the debaters find any common ground? Did they look?

In the next step, you will learn to understand how to compromise.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Enchanting Owl Post Received

Submitted by Naya Dribinski

Northern & Northeastern CO

Superior

Girl Scout Cadette Nadya of Superior is enchanted by the Owl Post from Tomahawk Ranch! She is grateful for the amazingly fun and beautifully put together box of camp magic to be enjoyed from home.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Cadette Finding Common Ground badge: Step Two of Five

 

The great thing about our country is we all can have different backgrounds, experiences and opinions, and still come together and work towards the common good. No matter the level of government – from your local school board to the Congress – people have to compromise – give up some things you want in order to support somethings someone else wants – in order to accomplish their goals. When you earn the Cadette Finding Common Ground badge, you will learn how governments do that – and how you can do it in your everyday life.

Step One: Get to Know Someone Different from You

Step Two: Make Decisions in a Group

In this step, you will need to work in a group. It could be planning and running your next Cadette meeting online; planning, shopping for, and cooking dinner with your family; or doing a big house project. The key goal is to make at least six decisions together as a group, such as when, where, and what you’ll eat; what you will accomplish in your meeting; who is responsible for which aspects of the project. Afterwards, discuss how the common-ground strategy you discovered in Step One affected your group’s ability to make decisions. Were compromises made for the good of the whole group? Did you trade for something you really wanted? How do you think the common-ground strategy would work at the local government level? At the state level? In Congress?

Decision Making Strategies

Majority Rules: Ask the members of your group their top three options. Write down the two most popular, and then have the group vote. The choice with the most votes wins.

Consensus or compromise: You really want to try a new Moroccan recipe. Your mom would rather a tried-and-true Mexican favorite. You could put a new spin on an old recipe, or agree that this time you’ll make the favorite and next time you’ll branch out. You both like Chinese food. Could you have chosen this instead? Discuss the options with your group until you’ve reached a decision everyone is happy with.

Pick at random: Make a numbered list with everyone’s choice. Roll a dice to choose one at random. You can also draw names out of a hat, flip a coin, or draw straws.

Use one or more of the methods above to help you make decisions in your group project.

In the next step, you will be exploring civil debate.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.