Tag Archives: Brownie Painting badge

Brownie Troop 77918 Honors Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Longmont Library

 

Submitted by Krista Allard

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Girl Scout Troop 77918 is so excited to share their collaborative mural honoring the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Longmont Library! Our Brownies earned their Painting badge by painting a nature scene with found items, talking about how paint colors can reflect their moods, and each Girl Scout painting two sections of this collaborative mural.

The Brownie mural was then presented to our whole troop while working on the Democracy badge on Election Night. During this meeting, we learned about the branches of our government, read the book “Grace for President” by Kelly DiPucchio, voted on our next badges to be completed, and learned about all the amazing things that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg accomplished for our country.

Take a walk past the Longmont Library to see our mural on the East Side of the Building!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Brownie Painting badge Part Four of Four

 

Brownies can earn their Painting badge at home thanks to Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team! We started by getting inspired and learning how to make an art journal. To help you fulfill Step Two (Paint the Real World) and Step Four (Paint Without Brushes), we made an aspen resist painting. In Step Three, we painted a mood. Now, we are going to tackle the last step of this badge, Step Five. Watch this video to learn how to make chalk mural. If you don’t have sidewalk chalk available, don’t worry. You can spend some time planning out your mural for a future date!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Brownie Painting badge Part Three of Four

Brownies can earn their Painting badge at home thanks to Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team! We started by getting inspired and learning how to make an art journal. To help you fulfill Step Two (Paint the Real World) and Step Four (Paint Without Brushes), we made an aspen resist painting. For Step Three, we are going to paint a mood.

Materials:

  • Paint
  • Brushes
  • Paper for your mood painting, scrap paper for experimenting, other materials to make marks with (optional)

For Step Three of earning the Brownie Painting badge, we’re going to paint like an abstract artist. What is abstract art? Abstract art refers to paintings, sculptures, and other art media that portray art that is not meant to look like something we can recognize—it is based on something we can feel and not something we can see. Abstract artists create works of art that express feelings, moods, and ideas through artistic elements such as line, shape, and color.

Line.

The strokes you make with your brush can be big or small, thin or thick, or long or short. Think of how you can express a mood in line—how can you use your brushstrokes to express what you are feeling?

Experiment with different brushstrokes on a piece of paper. Try making as many different lines as you can think of. You can also experiment with Step Four of this badge and make marks without using a traditional paintbrush. Try using a piece of string or yarn instead of a paintbrush.

Shape

How might shapes express emotion? Maybe, happiness could be many small circles, like bubbles? Maybe, anger could be big, spikey blobs? What shape would represent how you are feeling today?

After experimenting with lines, experiment with shapes. What different shapes can you make? You can splatter paint on your paper, or drip paint on your paper and blow it around with a straw.

Color

Artists, authors, and other creatives often use color to describe or portray certain moods. How can you use color in your painting to express a mood? Think about your favorite color and how it makes you feel. What about your least favorite color—how does it make you feel?

Experiment with mixing different colors—warm, cool, and neutral. Make swatches of your colors on a sheet of paper. Which colors are you most drawn to? How do they make you feel?

Look at these paintings by abstract artists:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/29/arts/design/review-helen-frankenthaler-abstract-climates-provincetown.html

https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/women-in-abstract-expressionism-636611

How do you feel when you look at them? What do you think they were feeling when they created them? How have they used line, shape, and color in their paintings?

For my mood painting, I decided to paint a piece depicting anger and fear since things have been kind of scary. Art is a great way to express yourself if you are feeling difficult feelings. Here is my finished painting, plus some pictures of how my painting progressed over time.

I started with painting my background and when it was dry. I dropped paint onto my paper and blew it into different shapes using a straw. Then I added some different colored lines around my blobs of paint.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Brownie Painting badge Part Two of Four

Brownies can earn their Painting badge at home thanks to Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team! We started by getting inspired and learning how to make an art journal. To help you fulfill Step Two (Paint the Real World) and Step Four (Paint Without Brushes), we’re going to teach you how to make an aspen resist painting. You can also watch a video to help you complete these steps of the badge.

Materials:

  • Paper
  • Paint and Palette/Plate
  • “Found” Paintbrushes (anything you choose to use as a paintbrush)
    • Cotton Swabs
    • Cotton Balls
    • Makeup Sponge
  • Yarn/String/Twine/Ribbon (6 pieces, each 12 inches long)
  • Tape
  • Pen/Marker/Pencil

Directions:

  1. Collect all of your materials and find a clean workspace.

  1. Tape your pieces of string/twine to the paper. The string will be blocking out the trunks of your aspen trees. So, if you want thin trunks, only use one piece of twine per tree. If you want thicker trunks, use two pieces of twine together.

  1. Once you’ve finished taping out your aspen trunks, it is time to paint!
    1. Take your found paintbrush and begin dabbing paint onto the paper. Dab all around the yarn, being careful not to move the yarn around as you paint.
    2. You want the blank spaces to remain under where the yarn is, as those will be the trunks of your aspen trees.

  1. You can use the same found paintbrush object (like a cotton ball or makeup sponge) for painting different colors. This will help with the color blending. You can also experiment with different types of found paintbrushes.

  1. Once you have finished painting, wait for the paint to dry for a little bit. Then, carefully un-tape and remove the yarn from the paper.

  1. Finally, draw details onto the tree trunks using a pen or marker. This is how you can make the white spaces left by the twine really look like aspen trees.

  1. Hang your finished painting somewhere prominent!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Brownie Painting badge Part One of Four

 

Brownies can earn their Painting badge at home thanks to Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team! Let’s start by getting inspired.

Option One: Take an Art Walk Through Your Home

Art can be found anywhere, including in your home! Get inspired by the art you walk by every day, but don’t always have the time to stop and appreciate.

Materials:

  • Blank piece of paper
  • Scissors
  • Pens/Pencils/Markers

Directions:

  1. Make a simple “art journal” to record your observations about the art that you find around your house. Watch our “how to” video for step-by-step instructions for making your own “art journal.”
  2. Look for any art that is hanging on the walls of your home.
  3. Discover art that might be sitting on shelves or tables.
  4. Check hallways, bedrooms, on the outside of the refrigerator, and even in bathrooms for any art you might have missed.
  5. Write down your observations about the art that you find. Here are some questions to get you started:
    1. Are there paintings? Photographs? Drawings? Sculptures?
    2. Are the artists who created these works famous or are they members of your family?
    3. Where in your house is most of the art located? Is it all a specific type or style of art?

Bonus: Draw an “art map” that shows the locations of some art in your house.

Option Two: Explore Two Virtual Art Museums

Did you know that you can explore some of the most famous museums in the world from the comfort of your couch? You can even explore art made by other kids! The International Museum of Children’s Art in Oslo, Norway is just one of many museums which you can visit virtually.

  1. Use a blank piece of paper as a simple “art journal” in which you can record your thoughts and observations! Watch our “how to” video for step-by-step instructions for making your own “art journal.”
  2. With your caregiver’s permission and after taking the Girl Scout Internet Safety Pledge, go online and virtually tour two amazing art museums.
  3. In your art journal, you can:
    1. Sketch some of your favorite pieces that you see during your tour, or
    2. Try to answer questions like: Which museum is your favorite? Do you have a favorite painter? What type of artistic movement do they belong to?

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.