Tag Archives: Brighton

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twenty-five Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing take action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Meg Bleyle from Highlands Ranch, Highlands Ranch High School, worked to increase the bee population by teaching children about how people need and depend on bees.
  • Beth Bolon from Longmont hosted a workshop for sixth grade girls to help them improve their communication skills and bolster their confidence when interacting with others.
  • Cheyanne Bridges from Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, partnered with the Pikes Peak Humane Society to support their animal medical fund by providing a sustainable source of donations from her school.
  • Tara Butler from Denver, Overland High School, created a course and curriculum specifically for senior citizens to educate them on how to use their smartphone and better understand the technology.
  • Kayleigh Cornell from Aurora, Grandview High School, started the Colorado Book Bank and collected more than 1,300 new and gently used books for students in a summer lunch program.
  • Victoria Delate from Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, created a four-week self-defense course to give her fellow students the knowledge and skills to protect themselves from sexual assault.
  • Emma Deutsch from Denver, Rocky Mountain School of Expeditionary Learning, improved the cat rooms at the Denver Animal Shelter. By creating a more welcoming and colorful space, she encouraged more people to adopt cats.
  • Kamaryn Evans from Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, worked to raise awareness for victims of domestic violence and for the Crisis Center, which works to end domestic violence through advocacy, education, and prevention.
  • Rose Goodman from Boulder, Boulder High School, created a lesson plan, which meets common-core standards, to educate second grade students about the declining bee population and how they can help bees.
  • Elizabeth Hoelscher from Aurora, Grandview High School, partnered with Avanti House, which houses teenage victims of sex trafficking, to build a new library for the home and create welcome baskets for the girls.
  • Ashlin Hult from Niwot, Niwot High School, created a series of materials for middle-school girls to encourage healthy body image and increase self-esteem.
  • Zoi Johns from Golden, Lakewood High School, coordinated the installation of three 10,000-liter water filtration tanks in a school in rural Uganda.
  • Makayla Kocher from Monument, Colorado Springs Christian School, created an art program for nursing home residents.
  • Kayleigh Limbach from Niwot, Niwot High School, wrote aguidebook for incoming International Baccalaureate students to help them weigh their options for their academic future.
  • Alexis Montague from Castle Rock, Castle View High School, hosted a panel discussion so girls could learn more about career opportunities in STEM.
  • Sarah Ness from Centennial, Eaglecrest High School, hosted nearly two dozen after-school art therapy sessions to help kids at her school relieve and manage stress.
  • Gwyneth Ormes from Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, organized a series of after-school workshops to teach elementary school girls Processing (a basic programming language), along with the foundational concepts of computer science.
  • Emma Parkhurst from Centennial, Littleton High School, revitalized The Lions Cupboard, a local clothing closet, to make the space more accessible for families in need.
  • Makala Roggenkamp from Arvada, Faith Christian Academy, partnered with Hope House and created book templates for children to develop a love of reading.
  • Abagail Sickinger from Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to help high school students get a job. Topics included: resume writing, what to wear, conducting yourself during an interview, and how to answer interview questions.
  • Katrina Stroud from Boulder, Niwot High School, created an activity booklet for The Butterfly Pavilion to teach children about Monarch butterflies and bumble bees.
  • Grayson Thomas from Lyons, Lyons High School, designed a mural of diverse and significant members of the STEM community for Lyons Middle/Senior High School.
  • Marieke van Erven from Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the elections department into high school government classes.
  • Melissa Wilson from Castle Rock, Castle View High School, developed several materials to educate people who can hear about how to interact with those who are deaf.
  • Inspired by her mother’s battle with cancer, Susan Wilson from Aurora, Grandview High School, created a media center for cancer patients undergoing treatment at Parker Adventist Hospital.

The Girl Scout Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership is making the world a better place.”

About Girl Scouts of Colorado

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Brighton Girl Scouts celebrate Juliette Gordon Low’s Birthday

Submitted by GSCO Volunteer Support Specialist Rebecca Lipman

Metro Denver

Brighton

Girl Scouts in Brighton’s Harper’s Ferry Service Unit gathered to celebrate the birthday of Girl Scout Founder Juliette Gordon Low and Halloween. In addition to the regular Halloween fun of dressing up, the girls decided to honor Juliette’s legacy and birthday by creating birthday kits that were donated to a local food bank! Knowing that birthdays can often be a difficult time financially for families, the birthday kits can be given to families in need to help relieve this burden. The birthday kits contained all the supplies needed to make a birthday cake, as well as cards made and signed by the Girl Scouts.

The girls also celebrated Halloween by dressing up, learning the Thriller dance, and having fun with some spooky science!

To make your own birthday kit you will need the following ingredients:

Cake mix
Icing
Candles
Disposable pan
Single serving applesauce
A gift bag it will all fit into

Happy Birthday Juliette Low!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award project: Marieke van Erven, Brighton, “VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education)”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I worked with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education). VOTE takes education about the elections department into high school government classes. The education includes the “behind the scenes” of a ballot, what happens during an election, security measures taken, and many other important aspects of the Elections Department. We also put on a student government to give students of all grade levels the experience of a “true” election.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my Gold Award by the number of students reached, 28 with education, and the feedback they gave on a survey. 26/28 felt they learned something they didn’t already know and better understood the Elections Department and what they do. VOTE will be continued through the Adams County Elections Department, which means that students will continue to be educated on the importance of voting, and the work the Elections Department does. Through feedback my team and I received from the students and the teacher, we revised the program to make it stronger for next year.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will continue through the Adams County Elections Department and will grow to reach more students. The current goal is to have VOTE in every high school in Adams County boundaries, then looking for further growth options. We are hoping to reach four high schools next year and continue to expand after that. Our thoughts and goals for expansion include reaching beyond Adams County at the state level.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Elections are a hot button topic for many people, especially after the 2016 General Election. VOTE addresses concerns that were seen at the national level. As a team, we are starting small with our education, but that will also grow to incorporate what is happening. High school government students learn about elections in the United States but may also look at elections abroad and the systems used, this helps to give them a deeper understanding and better connection to relate the electoral system to.

What did you learn about yourself?

During my Gold Award, I learned that I can work through obstacles. I hit several spots in my project where I could’ve easily given up. I had to change my project late in the year and then put a lot of work into making sure the VOTE program went into classrooms before the school year was over. Hard work pays off, and there is always another option when something seems impossible.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award has given me more confidence in myself and what I am capable of accomplishing. I will now look at projects with a different perspective knowing that I can push myself further than I thought was possible and overcome any obstacle put in my way. If you work hard enough, you can accomplish anything you put your mind to. As I am heading into college, this will be an especially important reminder that I will carry with me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Earning my Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout Experience because it was a good way to wrap up my time as a Girl Scout before moving to an adult member. I have been in Girl Scouts since Daisy’s and have grown up watching girls earn their Gold Awards. Watching my older Girl Scout sisters earning these awards and positively impacting the community around them was an inspiration to me. It taught me that I could one day have a similar impact on those around me, and it drove me to continue my Girl Scout journey even when I was busy with school and sports. I looked up to my Girl Scout sisters, and want to be that inspiration for other younger girls.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me learn to become a go-getter because of the challenges I faced. Changing my project in the middle of the year was not something I had planned on doing. I wanted to give up, but I knew there was still a difference I could make in my community. I had to look at the problem I had in a different way and see another issue that needed to be addressed. I, then, worked with the elections team to gain high school support. This project made me step outside my comfort zone and prove to many people that I am not just another high school student, I am a professional in this area. There was an obstacle proving this to my teachers and peers alike, as they have only ever seen me as a student.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Cookie Dad, Cookie Rad!

Submitted by Liz Sherman

Brighton

Denver Metro

My husband loves cookie season, not just for the cookies he buys, but also for cookie booths. He tries to take our Brownie to a booth once a week, at least. He drives her 45 minutes away to set up the booths and spend the time hanging out with her and talking with her in between customers. They wear their cookie costumes and he even poses for photos with customers. He has had to learn the sewing lingo to tell other troops how I made their costumes.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Brighton troop visits Rocky Mountain National Park

blogger-image-80177285

Submitted by Sadie Fowers

Brighton

After seeing details about the National Park Scout Badges, we arranged for our troop to spend a day with some Rocky Mountain National Park Rangers. We were excited to get out in the clear blue sky, clean air, and back to basics

Ranger Christie and Ranger Paige took us on an adventure. We started by talking about safety points, reviewing what was needed when out on our own, and then headed to the “wild” to study animals. We searched for what animals were not in hibernation by finding their tracks, scat, and habitats. We had lunch by the beautiful frozen lake taking in the peaceful picnic spot. We searched the area for what kind of conditions the animals survived during the winter and then we even made our own habitats for our “animals” to survive.

Each girl said that they had a great time. Our Girl Scouts behaved well and learned a lot. We cannot wait to go again. I love when learning and playing goes hand in hand.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Brighton Troop hosts Christmas Party and Toy Drive

[slideshow]
Submitted by Lisa Dunbar
Brighton

Brighton Girl Scout Troop 50458 Hosted
Harpers Ferry Service Unit
2nd Annual
Christmas Party & Toy Drive
With the Jolly ole’ man, Santa.

Troop 50458, a combination of Cadettes and Senior Girl Scouts, had seen a need to help out children during Christmas. The thought that many kids during Christmas would not wake up with a present under the tree, the girls wanted to make sure they could help out as many as they can, so why not ask our fellow Girl Scout Sisters to help out. So that is what they did. They contacted the City Of Brighton to help these kids in need. Came up the idea that they could host a Christmas Party and ask everyone who attended to bring an unwrapped toy for children of the ages 8-13 years of age for both girls and boys.

Each Girl Scout enjoyed playing a life size game of, Girl Scout Cookie Land, a remake of the famous Candy Land. Two crafts, “God’s eye” and snowflakes that were made with recycled paper.

At the end of the night, 180 Girl Scouts and family member attended the event with 220 toys donated to the City Of Brighton. On February 5, 2013 the Troop was given “Certificate Of Appreciation” by the City of Brighton for their willingness to help out The Brighton Employee Charities Committee for helping those in our community.

This story was submitted via the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

GSCO Literacy Challenge accepted, join PAL now!

Submitted by Sarah Albrecht-Walter
Brighton, CO

When Jessica, a 7-year-old Brownie in Brighton, saw the announcement for the statewide Literacy challenge with Colorado Reads and GSCO, she wanted to meet the Lt. Gov!

She immediately began brain storming ideas on how she could meet each of the nine requirements. She spoke with her troop leaders and all her troop sisters and while they wanted to help her, they were not sure about the planning… So Jessica started PAL! Now they just need to meet small goals for each part and make a BIG impact!

PAL: Promote an Advanced Learner is a her Girl Scout Take Action project to Improve Literacy here in Colorado thus meeting the Challenge, AND raise awareness and learning opportunities around the world for all our WAGGGS Sisters!

Jessica sent a HitchHiker Letterbox to Ireland (see the other Blog posts about the Dathuil) and she is already receiving notes on atlasquest.com that everyone can read from girls in Ireland who are signing and stamping her book. Her Irish partner is designing a patch for both countries. Jessica has designed a patch for Girl Scouts that join her PAL, so in addition to the Patch and 9 bars from GSCO, each Scout will also get a Patch from PAL and one from Ireland!

Our KickOff Party is Feb. 7th 2013, 4:30 at 101 N. Main St, Brighton, CO 80601, upstairs at the Elks’ Scout Meeting Room, hope to see you there with your donations, plans for the challenge and entries for the HitchHiker Letterbox Ireland is sending for us! No fee, just SWAPs maybe, a generous heart, and a literacy mindset! girlscouttroop51739@yahoo.com

This story was submitted via the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.:

Girl Scout carries on a family tradition of earning her Gold Award

Kim Crawford, a Girl Scout from Brighton, has earned Girl Scouts’ highest honor, the Gold Award, for a project she did to collect 600+ toothbrushes and toothpaste for those in need in Africa. What makes this accomplishment even more special is Kim, who is a junior in high school, is developmentally delayed (she only reads at 1st grade level), but hasn’t let her disability hold her back. Additionally Kim’s inspiration for her project came from her cousin, Kerry, who earned her Gold Award when she was a Girl Scout and worked for the Peace Corps in Africa.

Kim spent months on her project and received a lot of support from her Brighton community. Everyone who donated to the project signed a poster, which Kim sent to Africa with the donations. And all the people who received her donations in Africa also signed the poster and returned it at the end of the project. When talking to Kim, she uses the words “happy and proud” to describe how it made her feel to help others through this project. In fact, helping others is one of the main reasons she likes being a Girl Scout.

Kim is part of the Special Olympics and other organizations in her community, but Girl Scouts by far is her favorite where she’s been able to interact with peers who are not like herself. Her mother, Jayne, has been with her every step of the way on her Girl Scout journey and currently serves as an organizer for Girl Scout groups in their community (or a service unit manager).

Kim and her mother Jayne were interviewed on 9NEWS on Monday, Dec. 10th, about this project. Watch the interview here.

Girl Scout collects food to thank her community

[slideshow]

Several Brighton Girl Scouts have teamed up with Brighton area Cub Scouts to conduct a community food drive to benefit Brighton area food pantries this month. Girl Scouts and Cub Scouts have collected food outside of the Brighton King Soopers for the past couple of weeks.

Jessica, a Girl Scout Brownie from Brighton, came up for the idea for this project after her family had to get food from one of the food pantries to feed her family.

“She wanted to help because the food pantry didn’t have a lot of food when we visited,” said her mother, Sarah.

“I’m excited to help people who are hungry, “ said Jessica.

“Helping people – that’s just what Girl Scouts do, and be nice,” commented Girl Scout Hannah, who also helped with this project.

The group has collected lots of food, and will start delivering it to the area food pantries this weekend. During their delivery they will also get a special behind the scenes tour of what it takes to run a food pantry.

The Girl Scouts who helped out with this project are new to Girl Scouts (in fact they are part of Juliettes, or the individual girl program) and are very excited to be part of an organization that gives back to their community!