Tag Archives: Breckenridge

Silver Award project: Family Trail Day

Submitted by Sophia E.

Mountain Communities

Breckenridge

Our Girl Scout Silver Award project was to organize the first-ever Family Trail Day in Summit County to restore a turnpike on a National Forest trail. We partnered with the Friends of Dillon Ranger District and Keystone Science School to achieve this. Our troop organized the day, advertised for the event, and planned fun, educational activities for the children. On June 24 2017, two rangers led the adults to restore the deteriorated turnpike. While the adults were working, our troop led fun activities for the kids to teach them about nature. The day ended with a picnic and the turnpike underwent a major improvement. It was such a success that the ranger district plans on doing it again next year!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Gold Award Project: Entrepreneural development in Haiti Part Three

Submitted by Lilli T.

Mountain Communities

Breckenridge

Since last writing in regards to the progress on my Gold Award project, I have been in contact with several organizations in an effort to increase the sustainability of my Gold Award. My Gold Award focused on business education in Haiti and was a three-day business workshop for an 8th grade class on the western coast of Haiti. During the workshop the 15 students learned the five fundamental aspects of business through the design and production of a “little business.” The fundamentals that were focused on include: a business plan, loan, product design, advertising, and profit. After conducting this workshop in late May of this year, I have been in contact with 10 people who are connected with Haitian schools in hopes of extending the impact of my curriculum to multiple Haitian schools. I hope to either train people currently in Haiti or return to Haiti in the future to continue the use and development of the “Ti Biznis” program.

Gold Award project: Entrepreneural Development in Haiti Part Two

Submitted by Lilli T.

Mountain Communities

Breckenridge

Through Girl Scouts, girls learn a plethora of skills including the encouragement to reach higher. My name is Lilli and I am no exception to the adoption of these skills as through Girl Scouts I was able to accomplish an honor I never sought possible.

Last year, I connected with the Haitian school of St. Paul’s and in doing so I began to learn about the education climate in Haiti. Haitian education rates are among the lowest in the western hemisphere with a literacy rate of 61% compared to America’s 86%. 88% of eligible Haitian students are enrolled in primary school while 20% are enrolled in secondary school. The Haitian government provides very little funds for public schools, with only 10% of the government’s budget spent on public schools. 21.5% of the population, age 5+, receive a secondary education, and 1% receive a university level education. 33% of children (ages 6-12) do not attend school. In acknowledgment of these statistics, and with an interest in business, I wanted to provide an extension to the 8th grade curriculum at the Haitian School of St. Paul’s by incorporating a business component into their education.

This past month, I partnered with the Colorado Haiti Project and from May 29-31, 2017 I conducted a three day business workshop for the 8th grade class of St. Paul’s Episcopal School in Petit Trou de Nippes, Haiti. During the workshop the ten students learned the five fundamentals of business: how to create a business plan, what loans are, how to design a product, how to advertise it, and ultimately how to earn a profit. Through the workshop, the students learned about the concept of supply and demand, economic competition, etc. There were five product options in which the students were able to choose from; dominos, checkers, sak through, friendship bracelets, and a home garden bed. Students were able to work in groups of two, or individually. In an effort to manage the competition, no more than three groups, or people, were able to make a product. The students began by choosing a product and proceeding to fill out a business plan and create advertisements. The following day the students took out loans from the “Monopoly Bank” and then proceed to the wholesale store in which they purchased the necessary materials to make their product(s). For the duration of the second day, students sewed, painted, colored, and braided their products. On the final day, the students finished their products and a moc-market was held in which the administration of St. Pau’ls and I purchased the students product with Monopoly money. Following the market, the students payed back half of their loan and then were able to purchase the leftover materials from the wholesale store.

The aspect of the business workshop that was most humbling was the following day when St. Paul’s hosted a community wide agricultural festival. At the festival, the students that participated in my workshop sold friendship bracelets and other products that they had made the previous night from the material they were able to purchase with the profit they had made. Through the information and encouragement provided during the business workshop students were able to make a real profit. My primary goal in working to earn my Gold Award is to provide these 8th graders, whom some will not continue school after this year, with an enriched education that will help them in the workforce. Witnessing these 8th graders using the fundamentals that we focused on in class and putting them to use so quickly and successfully was a true accomplishment.

Another aspect I hope to cover in earning my Gold Award is to educate those in the United States and elsewhere about the education climate in Haiti and encourage them to get involved!

Gold Award project: Entrepreneurial development in Haiti

My name is Lilli T. and I live in Breckenridge. I am currently working on my Girl Scout Gold Award, which will take place in the Haitian school of St. Paul’s.

Haitian education rates are among the lowest in the western hemisphere with a literacy rate of 61% compared to America’s 86%. Haiti has 15,200 primary schools, 90% of which are non-public and run by religious affiliations. The United States has 66,718 public primary schools. 88% of eligible Haitian students are enrolled in primary school, while 20% are enrolled in secondary school. Secondary and higher level education in provided by public and private institutions. The Haitian government provides very little funds for public schools, only 10% of the government’s budget is spent on public schools. Out of the 67% enrollment rate for primary school, 70% continue to the third grade. 21.5% of the population, age 5+, receive a secondary education, and 1% receive a university level education. 33% of children (ages 6-12) do not attend school.

The school where I will be completing my Gold Award at is named St. Paul’s. St Paul’s school is located in Petit Trou de Nippes, Haiti, a rural coastal town located 80 miles west of the capital, Port-Au-Prince. It was founded in 1990 and began as a one room schoolhouse educating all ages and boys and girls together. It has since grown to a co-ed fall 2016 enrollment of 400+ students ranging from grades K-8. St. Paul’s enrollment fee is $350 per student or $7,000 a class. However, due to the devoted Colorado Haiti Project and its partners, tuition is nearly free to all students.

For my Gold Award, I am partnering with the Colorado Haiti Project and heading their new youth entrepreneurial program for the 8th grade class at St. Paul`s Episcopal School in Petit Trou. I will be organizing a three-day hands-on business workshop that is an opportunity for 8th grader students to “start” small businesses. The students will learn a simplified version of the five fundamentals of business – creating business plan, product, loans, advertising, and how to earn a profit. They will start with thinking about their markets, design, advertising and create a budget. They will then go to the “bank” and take out a loan with which they will visit the “wholesale store” where they will buy the materials for the products they will make. The students will spend a day or two making their products and on the final day a market will be held where they will sell their products. After the sale, they will pay back their loan to the “bank” and are then allowed to visit the wholesale store to buy materials, or candy, to make more products for fun!

My primary goal in completing my Gold Award is to provide these 8th graders, whom some will not continue school after this year, with an enriched education that will help them in the work force. I also hope to educate those in the United States and elsewhere about the education climate in Haiti and encourage them to get involved in making a change!

 

 

 

Breckenridge Brownie Troop 55311 donates cookies to Domus Pacis

Submitted by Cricket Hawkins

Mountain Communities

Breckenridge 

Saturday, March 4, 2017 was an exciting evening for the eight girls of Troop 55311! They set up a fabulous table at the Domus Pacis Eagles Tribute Concert in the Riverwalk Center at Breckenridge and wowed the audience during intermission with a presentation about the Girl Scout Cookie Sale Program and their Hometown Hero, Domus Pacis. The girls stood on stage with “Duck” White-Petteruti, Founding Director of Domus Pacis, and read a short script with complete confidence including announcing their goal to donate 250 packages of cookies. Domus Pacis then teased the audience with “good news” … the selling of Girl Scout Cookies … followed by their “sad news” … the audience would not be able to eat any for the cookies were to be donated to Domus Pacis for inclusion in the Welcome Bags they give to each family to enjoy during their respite stay in host homes in Summit County! The patrons, fully aware of this wonderful organization and Girl Scouts of Colorado, were totally on board!
After the presentation, the girls walked through the audience singing “Make New Friends” while heading back to their table to greet the folks who wanted to support their effort. To their surprise, the audience “purchased” enough cookies to supply 430 packages to Domus Pacis for the organization’s Welcome Bags. We are so proud of these young girls and look forward to many more kind deeds from this troop!

Domus Pacis Family Respite is a non-profit organization created with the entire family in mind. Their mission is to offer individuals, who are on a challenging medical journey, a homelike environment that encourages interaction with other family members and caregivers in a comfortable and peaceful surrounding. To learn more about Domus Pacis visit www.domuspacis.org.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

 

Girl Scouts, their moms experience Empowered Family Training

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Submitted by Cricket Hawkins

Breckenridge

Mountain Communities

The Mountain Communities hosted IMPACT Personal Safety Colorado for a two-day training at Summit County’s South Branch Library in Breckenridge.
IMPACT’s Empowered Family: Child and Caregiver Safety Program is a strength-based, primary prevention, program that focuses on skills and topics appropriate for each participant or group including boundary setting, bully and abuse prevention, self-advocacy, and personal empowerment.

“I found tremendous value in it for my 2 daughters ages 7 and 9, and me. My girls learned how to stand up for themselves to children in bullying situations and how to stand up to an adult if that adult were to do something that made them uncomfortable. Most importantly they learned how to tell a parent about it. These are situations that are sometimes hard to talk to your children about without scaring them. Impact provided training that made my daughters feel strong and confident, not scared and fearful. One of the most important things that was taught to the girls was to trust their instinct if something doesn’t feel right (or if they get “bad butterflies”) and to listen to it. My daughters and I were taught how to fight off an abductor, which was empowering for all of us. This training was a thought provoking (and sometimes emotional) experience and the things that I learned will make me more aware of my surroundings, a better listener, and ultimately, a better parent. I would recommend this for any mother that has children, and any child (boy or girl).”
“This experience was beyond words! I went through every emotion as the team set us up and trained us for situations that we hope will never happen to us. My 7 year old daughter and I learned how to use our verbal language, body language, and finally how to fight back to protect ourselves. I feel that this training has changed my life. I am not afraid to stand up for myself and my family if ever anyone tries to hurt us. Impact Colorado is an amazing group of people!”

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Breckenridge Girl Scouts Honored Statewide, Locally

Eight Breckenridge Girl Scouts were recently named to Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Generation Wow! In celebration, Breckenridge Mayor John Warner presided over a ceremony at the Senior Center on May 2nd to recognize these Girl Scouts. The eight girls recognized were Geneva Ascher, Leah Carney, Nicole Choma, Littlepage Green, Savannah Halvorson, Kalina Macias, Natalia Niemckwicz and Lilli Tobias.

The girls, 6th graders at Summit Middle School, were among 100 girls chosen from around Colorado who are destined to be the leaders of tomorrow. Their advisor, Kari Killberg, praised their leadership, saying, “It’s been a wonderful experience watching these girls grow from little Brownies doing crafts to the lovely young ladies they are today. They have taken on responsibility for their meetings and service projects, and all the planning that goes along with it.  They are committed to making friends and making a difference in their world. I can’t wait to see what the future holds for all of them because it’s going to be amazing!”

County Commissioner Thomas Davidson, also in attendance for the May 2nd ceremony, was impressed with the girls’ confidence and accomplishments.  “I am so proud of Summit County’s Girl Scouts, and it is particularly impressive that our little county has eight girls of the 100 selected statewide,” he said.  “It’s a testament to how well we’re preparing our girls to lead in the future.”

The 100 girls of Generation Wow! – including the eight local awardees – were chosen from around the state to celebrate Girl Scouts’ 100th anniversary this year. This distinction recognized outstanding girls between the ages of 5 and 18 whose individual achievements in Girl Scouts, their schools and communities set them apart as leaders. They exhibited a high level of volunteer achievement and made significant contributions to their community; demonstrated strong leadership skills; participated in a service learning project; and demonstrated exceptional teamwork, conflict resolution, and goal setting.

There are nearly 200 Girl Scouts in Summit County and 30,000 Girl Scouts statewide, all living the mission of becoming girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. For more information about joining or volunteering with the Girl Scouts in Summit County, please call Cricket Hawkins at 970-379-9059 or visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Check out the article about this event in the Summit Daily News.

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