Tag Archives: Breckenridge

Gold Award Girl Scout: Littlepage Green, Breckenridge, “The Allergy Initiative”

 

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I worked with Mrs. Kassib, a health teacher at Summit High School, to create a lesson plan to educate health students about food allergies. I taught six classes using the lesson plan I developed and I also led epi-pen training after I had finished my lesson. To make my project accessible to a broader community, I created a video, using the lesson plan, and posted it on YouTube.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my project’s impact on my target audience by having the students take a Kahoot, an educational tool used to check the student’s knowledge while making it a fun game for the students. It was a fun way to motivate them to listen, and it also let me see how well they understood my presentation. At most, the students got two wrong out of ten questions in each class period.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be continued to be used in Summit High School’s health program where they will show the video I created and use some demo epi-pens I donated to train students. I also created a video that was put on YouTube. I shared the link on all my social media networks, so people could always access it and continue to share the video.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

While small, the national link is through YouTube and social media. Because social media is widely used, both nationally and globally, my project will be seen by people outside of my community. Those people will then be able to share the video with their friends and they can share them with their friends and so on.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I like to take on all the responsibility and do everything myself, which isn’t the best way to get projects completed. So, I learned how important delegating can be when you have a big project or are working with a group. I also learned that teaching and leading a class made me feel so accomplished. I learned how to speak in front of groups better than I could before, and because of that, I felt accomplished.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

In the future, I will be more likely to take up leadership roles. I feel more comfortable leading a group effectively. Because I feel more comfortable overall leading, I will take up opportunities to lead. The more I lead the more my leadership skills will grow. Because I strengthened certain leadership skills on this project, I will be able to strengthen other leadership skills that may not have been as strong on this project, like my communication skills.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award helped me to realize more about myself, like little habits that really slowed down my project. It was important because it used all the little bits of information and skill I had learned throughout all my years of being a Girl Scout. I then had to apply all those to my project, and it felt as though everything came full circle.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

The Gold Award helped me to become an overall better leader. It helped me to step out of my comfort zone to talk to people whom I normally wouldn’t as well as push me to stand up in front of 20 or so children per class and talk for an hour. It also pushed me to think of creative solutions to problems that I normally would have let stop me from completing a project.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Geneva Ascher, Breckenridge, “Testicular and Breast Cancer Self Exams”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

For my Gold Award project, I instructed the freshman,  along with some sophomores, juniors, and seniors at my high school, how to perform self exams for testicular cancer and breast cancer. My project included a Google slide presentation and fake testicles and breasts, with mock cancerous lumps so that students could understand what they are looking for when performing self exams.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Before my presentation, I conducted a survey though Google forms asking students what they would do of they every encounter an abnormality with their body. The way I asked the question lead to the biased answer of contacting a doctor, but even with my biased conclusion, students were still unsure. After my presentation, there was a very similar questionnaire on their Health Unit test, and many of the students said they would contact their doctor after finding anything different about their body.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

After the completion of my project, the health teacher and the health science teacher at my school pledged to make it a formal part of her annual curriculum at Summit High School. Beyond this, I have made a video that will be played on Tiger TV through Summit County TV10.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Beyond just having this presented in health classes at Summit High School, my friends and I edited a video giving a quick presentation on my project ,in Video Production 2 and it will be play on Summit County TV 10 through their broadcast journalism segments produced by the students in the Video programs at Summit High School. This reaches a global connection because Summit County is a very destination/recreation vacation spot and people from all over the world can watch SCTV10 as they stay in hotels in Summit County. This video will also be uploaded to YouTube.

What did you learn about yourself?

This project was very outside of my comfort zone. I have always been very afraid of public speaking, but this project gave me the leadership skills of taking action in situations I would have normally never put my self into. Through the Gold Award project and the majority of my Girl Scout experiences have led me to be the person I am today. I am now less held back, more outgoing, and I now have the will to complete any task that is brought my way. My determination through this project has also given me the chance to be the vice president of the Certified Nurses Assistant Club, Summit Health Leaders at my school. This has also given me a chance to grow my leadership skills. The Gold Award has brought me to a mentality that I can accomplish all that I work for.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Getting my Gold Award has proven to me that I can finish anything I put my mind to. Whether it is schoolwork or making a difference to the community around me, I now know that I can change anything that I feel needs to be changed. Dedication is one of my strongest attributes now. This can help me in the future because I am not sure what life holds for me, but I am confident I will find success.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The most important part of my Gold Award was the awareness that I have created for two very curable cancers. My view on these cancers are that if sex and mental health are so widely talked about in schools, cancers, too, need to be talked about.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

G- This project had the intention of getting me through the stress of something that will only benefit the community and eventually the world around me. This is important to me because I have never been the greatest about completing tasks that may seem a little difficult. But because I enjoyed the topic and the atmosphere I created with my Gold Award, I was determined to complete it. This will serve me in the rest of my life because I now have the mind set that even if I do not enjoy what I am working on, the feeling of completing a given task is so rewarding it is always worth it.

I- Though out my project, I created new ideas and brought my self into new positions that I would never have put my self in. My Gold Award has created a new, interesting presentation shown through out my school, but it has brought out the best in me. I am now comfortable with my self and am comfortable with unfamiliar situations.

R- The Gold Award says nothing more than risk-taker to me. To complete this project, you need to put your self out into new positions, find new interests, and make a difference. No difference would be made in the world if people never tried anything new.

L- My high school life has been filled with different leadership positions, but the Gold Award has brought it to new heights. I am now able to finish all that is brought my way, with confidence that I have done my best.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Nicole Choma, Breckenridge, “Elementary School Rugby Program”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I created an elementary school rugby program, and I was able to teach elementary school age children rugby, with my coaching skills.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

To measure the impact of my Gold Award, I hope to see more participation in the middle and high school teams for both boys and girls rugby. To be able to see impact, I had the children raise their hands in the beginning and end of the program and I asked them who was interested in playing rugby in the future. I saw more and more hands being raised at the end of the program, which meant that more children wanted to join at the end of my program.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustained by training younger teammates to take over this camp for the years to come. I will be involved until graduation. My hope for the younger ruggers is to build upon their leadership skills and perform to their highest expectations once I leave the program. My rugby coach and the Summit Rugby Team board will also be involved with continuing the program.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The global link to my project is that rugby is played worldwide. It is mainly thriving in countries such as Australia, New Zealand, England, Ireland, and South Africa. This sport was also reintroduced into the 2016 Rio Summer Olympics and will be continued onto the 2020 summer Olympics. So will the increasing popularity of the sport, it would be important to have knowledge upon the sport. I also talked about this global link with the kids at the program. Many of them did not know that rugby was an Olympic sport and how much is was played around the world. Globally, rugby is ranked at #6, with the second most watched and attended competition that is just behind the FIFA world cup. According to ranker.com in the U.S rugby is ranked as #19 comparing this to the worldwide favorite sport of soccer that is ranked at #5.

What did you learn about yourself?

With this project I learned more of what my weaknesses were. Some of those weaknesses included organization and communication. I learned that those were the areas that I needed to improve upon, which takes me how I improved through this project. I learned that in order to have everything work out you need to have everything planned, to be able to communicate to others, on what I want to accomplish.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

It will be a good source that I can reflect upon, and know that if I set my mind to something I can achieve it. I will also have the sense that I did something good for my community before I left for college, and it has inspired me to do more great things for the people around me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it was a good way to conclude my Girl Scout experience and really put all of the skills that I have learned as a Girl Scout into my Gold Award, but also lead me to be a lifetime Girl Scout.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award has taught me things that I didn’t realize that I was empowered with. The most that empowered me and caused my project to be successful was for me to be a risk-taker. Doing this project, I had to take a risk, that risk was to teach a whole new group of people that didn’t really know the sport of rugby. It was not a easy task. I had to innovate and bring a whole new idea of a sport to a group of people. Striving for my Gold Award helped with that significantly.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Lilli Tobias, Breckenridge, “Ti Biznis”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I partnered with the Colorado Haiti Project and developed a youth entrepreneurial program for the eighth-grade class at St. Paul’s Episcopal School in Petit Trou, Haiti. The three-day hands-on business workshop was an opportunity for eighth-grade students to “start” small businesses or Ti Biznis. The students learned the five fundamentals of business beginning with creating a business plan, gathering a loan, creating a product, advertising it, and creating a profit to be sustainable.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Following the three-day workshop, the students took a business survey, as well as demonstrated their proficiency by all earning a profit. Even more so, following the workshop, the students went home and created more products with the materials they were able to purchase with their profit and began selling their products for real money.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact your involvement?

Following my workshop, the Colorado Haiti Project will continue to use my curriculum and the design of my workshop for five years. Along with the Colorado Haiti Project, I have also been in contact with other Haitian schools as well as a non-profit that works in Honduras where my curriculum could be of value.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

As my Gold Award is already internationally focused, I have presented to several local groups to expand the impact of my Gold Award within Summit County. I have presented to the French Honors Society at my school, to my leadership class, and to Interact, the youth version of Rotary International. I also reached out to  9News several times through email, call, text, and video and did not receive a response. Through my local outreach, The Summit Foundation, an organization in Summit County that promotes philanthropy, awarded me with 2017 Most Outstanding and Philanthropic Youth at a community-wide ceremony held in November 2017. I will continue my impact through speaking to local troops about the value of the Gold Award and Girl Scouts as well as promoting education in other third world countries such as Honduras.

What did you learn about yourself?

Through my Gold Award, I learned to truly step into my leadership potential. This started with being comfortable talking on the phone, to organizing huge fundraising events, organizing volunteers, gathering community support, improving on being adaptable, to my most important and improved skill of public speaking. All of these skills are vitally important to growing up and becoming a female leader of tomorrow. My Gold Award has allowed me to be a source of leadership and philanthropy in my community, which will lead to scholarships, colleges, and so much more. I can not thank Girl Scouts enough for not only providing me with this opportunity, but for encouraging me to reach for the stars.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My leadership skills will absolutely continue to grow and strengthen because of my Gold Award. We all set our own limitations, whatever they may be, and throughout my Gold Award journey, I have truly surpassed many of the limits I had set. My public speaking, ability to smoothly and comfortably speak on the phone, organize, direct, and leverage influence was all cultivated in my Gold Award and is now propelling me to new heights. My main fundraiser for my Gold Award was a Haitian Gala dinner. It was my first time ever attempting to organize an event of this nature and capacity and it was beyond successful. It was so successful, fun, and I learned so much from it that I will be doing another gala dinner this year on March 17, 2018, to support education in Honduras. Not only has Girl Scouts and my Gold Award developed my leadership, but it has developed my philanthropic spirit. All the work and efforts put forth through my Silver Award which turned into me starting my own philanthropic bakery, to my Gold Award and promoting education in third world countries was never done for fame but because I truly find joy in doing so. However, in 2017 the Summit Foundation honored me as Summit County’s Most Outstanding Philanthropic Youth of the year. This recognition was so heartwarming and humbling. I was able to shed light on Girl Scouts and the character development it provides and how “worth it” it is to stay involved in the program.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

For me, the Gold Award journey was the bow on the present. It tied everything together, the Journeys, cookie program, various events, and service were all brought together in one package with completing the Gold Award. It’s all about the process from whenever a girl joins Girl Scouts to when they finish. And with it being such a long, yet rewarding journey, completing the Gold Award makes all the time, energy, and effort worth it. It’s such a  rewarding process that I hope all girls strive for!

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award forced me to be a go-getter. Without that characteristic of being a G.I.R.L, my Gold Award would not have been what it is. I have always had a “bossy” personality and once I got older I became ashamed of that characteristic and felt that it made me seem aggressive or mean. But through my Gold Award journey, it was put into perspective that being “bossy” doesn’t have to be a bad thing. I am proud that I can shape my characteristic of taking charge into a positive light of being a go-getter because, without strong girls and women who harness their go-getter mentality, we wouldn’t be heading into the groundbreaking future we are.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Silver Award project: Family Trail Day

Submitted by Sophia E.

Mountain Communities

Breckenridge

Our Girl Scout Silver Award project was to organize the first-ever Family Trail Day in Summit County to restore a turnpike on a National Forest trail. We partnered with the Friends of Dillon Ranger District and Keystone Science School to achieve this. Our troop organized the day, advertised for the event, and planned fun, educational activities for the children. On June 24 2017, two rangers led the adults to restore the deteriorated turnpike. While the adults were working, our troop led fun activities for the kids to teach them about nature. The day ended with a picnic and the turnpike underwent a major improvement. It was such a success that the ranger district plans on doing it again next year!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Gold Award Project: Entrepreneural development in Haiti Part Three

Submitted by Lilli T.

Mountain Communities

Breckenridge

Since last writing in regards to the progress on my Gold Award project, I have been in contact with several organizations in an effort to increase the sustainability of my Gold Award. My Gold Award focused on business education in Haiti and was a three-day business workshop for an 8th grade class on the western coast of Haiti. During the workshop the 15 students learned the five fundamental aspects of business through the design and production of a “little business.” The fundamentals that were focused on include: a business plan, loan, product design, advertising, and profit. After conducting this workshop in late May of this year, I have been in contact with 10 people who are connected with Haitian schools in hopes of extending the impact of my curriculum to multiple Haitian schools. I hope to either train people currently in Haiti or return to Haiti in the future to continue the use and development of the “Ti Biznis” program.

Gold Award project: Entrepreneural Development in Haiti Part Two

Submitted by Lilli T.

Mountain Communities

Breckenridge

Through Girl Scouts, girls learn a plethora of skills including the encouragement to reach higher. My name is Lilli and I am no exception to the adoption of these skills as through Girl Scouts I was able to accomplish an honor I never sought possible.

Last year, I connected with the Haitian school of St. Paul’s and in doing so I began to learn about the education climate in Haiti. Haitian education rates are among the lowest in the western hemisphere with a literacy rate of 61% compared to America’s 86%. 88% of eligible Haitian students are enrolled in primary school while 20% are enrolled in secondary school. The Haitian government provides very little funds for public schools, with only 10% of the government’s budget spent on public schools. 21.5% of the population, age 5+, receive a secondary education, and 1% receive a university level education. 33% of children (ages 6-12) do not attend school. In acknowledgment of these statistics, and with an interest in business, I wanted to provide an extension to the 8th grade curriculum at the Haitian School of St. Paul’s by incorporating a business component into their education.

This past month, I partnered with the Colorado Haiti Project and from May 29-31, 2017 I conducted a three day business workshop for the 8th grade class of St. Paul’s Episcopal School in Petit Trou de Nippes, Haiti. During the workshop the ten students learned the five fundamentals of business: how to create a business plan, what loans are, how to design a product, how to advertise it, and ultimately how to earn a profit. Through the workshop, the students learned about the concept of supply and demand, economic competition, etc. There were five product options in which the students were able to choose from; dominos, checkers, sak through, friendship bracelets, and a home garden bed. Students were able to work in groups of two, or individually. In an effort to manage the competition, no more than three groups, or people, were able to make a product. The students began by choosing a product and proceeding to fill out a business plan and create advertisements. The following day the students took out loans from the “Monopoly Bank” and then proceed to the wholesale store in which they purchased the necessary materials to make their product(s). For the duration of the second day, students sewed, painted, colored, and braided their products. On the final day, the students finished their products and a moc-market was held in which the administration of St. Pau’ls and I purchased the students product with Monopoly money. Following the market, the students payed back half of their loan and then were able to purchase the leftover materials from the wholesale store.

The aspect of the business workshop that was most humbling was the following day when St. Paul’s hosted a community wide agricultural festival. At the festival, the students that participated in my workshop sold friendship bracelets and other products that they had made the previous night from the material they were able to purchase with the profit they had made. Through the information and encouragement provided during the business workshop students were able to make a real profit. My primary goal in working to earn my Gold Award is to provide these 8th graders, whom some will not continue school after this year, with an enriched education that will help them in the workforce. Witnessing these 8th graders using the fundamentals that we focused on in class and putting them to use so quickly and successfully was a true accomplishment.

Another aspect I hope to cover in earning my Gold Award is to educate those in the United States and elsewhere about the education climate in Haiti and encourage them to get involved!

Gold Award project: Entrepreneurial development in Haiti

My name is Lilli T. and I live in Breckenridge. I am currently working on my Girl Scout Gold Award, which will take place in the Haitian school of St. Paul’s.

Haitian education rates are among the lowest in the western hemisphere with a literacy rate of 61% compared to America’s 86%. Haiti has 15,200 primary schools, 90% of which are non-public and run by religious affiliations. The United States has 66,718 public primary schools. 88% of eligible Haitian students are enrolled in primary school, while 20% are enrolled in secondary school. Secondary and higher level education in provided by public and private institutions. The Haitian government provides very little funds for public schools, only 10% of the government’s budget is spent on public schools. Out of the 67% enrollment rate for primary school, 70% continue to the third grade. 21.5% of the population, age 5+, receive a secondary education, and 1% receive a university level education. 33% of children (ages 6-12) do not attend school.

The school where I will be completing my Gold Award at is named St. Paul’s. St Paul’s school is located in Petit Trou de Nippes, Haiti, a rural coastal town located 80 miles west of the capital, Port-Au-Prince. It was founded in 1990 and began as a one room schoolhouse educating all ages and boys and girls together. It has since grown to a co-ed fall 2016 enrollment of 400+ students ranging from grades K-8. St. Paul’s enrollment fee is $350 per student or $7,000 a class. However, due to the devoted Colorado Haiti Project and its partners, tuition is nearly free to all students.

For my Gold Award, I am partnering with the Colorado Haiti Project and heading their new youth entrepreneurial program for the 8th grade class at St. Paul`s Episcopal School in Petit Trou. I will be organizing a three-day hands-on business workshop that is an opportunity for 8th grader students to “start” small businesses. The students will learn a simplified version of the five fundamentals of business – creating business plan, product, loans, advertising, and how to earn a profit. They will start with thinking about their markets, design, advertising and create a budget. They will then go to the “bank” and take out a loan with which they will visit the “wholesale store” where they will buy the materials for the products they will make. The students will spend a day or two making their products and on the final day a market will be held where they will sell their products. After the sale, they will pay back their loan right here to the “bank” and are then allowed to visit the wholesale store to buy materials, or candy, to make more products for fun!

My primary goal in completing my Gold Award is to provide these 8th graders, whom some will not continue school after this year, with an enriched education that will help them in the work force. I also hope to educate those in the United States and elsewhere about the education climate in Haiti and encourage them to get involved in making a change!

 

 

 

Breckenridge Brownie Troop 55311 donates cookies to Domus Pacis

Submitted by Cricket Hawkins

Mountain Communities

Breckenridge 

Saturday, March 4, 2017 was an exciting evening for the eight girls of Troop 55311! They set up a fabulous table at the Domus Pacis Eagles Tribute Concert in the Riverwalk Center at Breckenridge and wowed the audience during intermission with a presentation about the Girl Scout Cookie Sale Program and their Hometown Hero, Domus Pacis. The girls stood on stage with “Duck” White-Petteruti, Founding Director of Domus Pacis, and read a short script with complete confidence including announcing their goal to donate 250 packages of cookies. Domus Pacis then teased the audience with “good news” … the selling of Girl Scout Cookies … followed by their “sad news” … the audience would not be able to eat any for the cookies were to be donated to Domus Pacis for inclusion in the Welcome Bags they give to each family to enjoy during their respite stay in host homes in Summit County! The patrons, fully aware of this wonderful organization and Girl Scouts of Colorado, were totally on board!
After the presentation, the girls walked through the audience singing “Make New Friends” while heading back to their table to greet the folks who wanted to support their effort. To their surprise, the audience “purchased” enough cookies to supply 430 packages to Domus Pacis for the organization’s Welcome Bags. We are so proud of these young girls and look forward to many more kind deeds from this troop!

Domus Pacis Family Respite is a non-profit organization created with the entire family in mind. Their mission is to offer individuals, who are on a challenging medical journey, a homelike environment that encourages interaction with other family members and caregivers in a comfortable and peaceful surrounding. To learn more about Domus Pacis visit www.domuspacis.org.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

 

Girl Scouts, their moms experience Empowered Family Training

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Submitted by Cricket Hawkins

Breckenridge

Mountain Communities

The Mountain Communities hosted IMPACT Personal Safety Colorado for a two-day training at Summit County’s South Branch Library in Breckenridge.
IMPACT’s Empowered Family: Child and Caregiver Safety Program is a strength-based, primary prevention, program that focuses on skills and topics appropriate for each participant or group including boundary setting, bully and abuse prevention, self-advocacy, and personal empowerment.

“I found tremendous value in it for my 2 daughters ages 7 and 9, and me. My girls learned how to stand up for themselves to children in bullying situations and how to stand up to an adult if that adult were to do something that made them uncomfortable. Most importantly they learned how to tell a parent about it. These are situations that are sometimes hard to talk to your children about without scaring them. Impact provided training that made my daughters feel strong and confident, not scared and fearful. One of the most important things that was taught to the girls was to trust their instinct if something doesn’t feel right (or if they get “bad butterflies”) and to listen to it. My daughters and I were taught how to fight off an abductor, which was empowering for all of us. This training was a thought provoking (and sometimes emotional) experience and the things that I learned will make me more aware of my surroundings, a better listener, and ultimately, a better parent. I would recommend this for any mother that has children, and any child (boy or girl).”
“This experience was beyond words! I went through every emotion as the team set us up and trained us for situations that we hope will never happen to us. My 7 year old daughter and I learned how to use our verbal language, body language, and finally how to fight back to protect ourselves. I feel that this training has changed my life. I am not afraid to stand up for myself and my family if ever anyone tries to hurt us. Impact Colorado is an amazing group of people!”

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.